Tag Archives: Washington D. C.

Adams & Dunshee

1854                Pennsylvania Avenue, Between 4½ and 6th Streets, Washington, D. C.

Adams & Dunshee (George Adams & Edward S. Dunshee) were recorded in four advertisements and one announcement in the Daily Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  The first advertisement ran from January 12 to April 4, 1854.  Metropolitan Daguerrian Gallery.  (Formerly Thompson’s)  The proprietors having purchased the above establishment would invite the attention of the citizens of Washington and vicinity to specimens of their photographic skill which have excited the admiration of all who have seen them , and which are admitted by artists to be unsurpassed if equaled by anything heretofore attained in the art.

Miniatures made in every style equally as well in cloudy as fair weather.

Especial attention is solicited to our new style of colored photographs.  Adams & Dunshee.    

The announcement appeared on January 16, 1854.  Daguerreotypes.—We were shown to-day some specimens of colored daguerreotypes, by Adams & Dunshee, successors to Thompson, at the Metropolitan Gallery, on Pa. avenue, between 4½ and 6th streets, which for delicacy of finish and beauty of coloring, are inimitable, the flesh tint is equal to life.  the colored daguerreotypes are a great improvement upon the plain ones.

The second advertisement ran from January 16 to 31, 1854.  Adams & Dunshee, successors to Thompson, are making and coloring Daguerreotypes superior in beauty and delicacy of finish to any heretofore made in the city.  Pa. avenue between 4½ and 6th streets

Call at their Metropolitan Gallery, and examine their work.            

The third advertisement ran from January 28 to February 7, 1854. Popular Demonstrations.—This emphatically an age of demonstrations, but one of the most popular and agreeable demonstrations we think of just now is that which test the excellence and superiority of the Daguerreotypes made by Adams & Dunshee successors to Thompson.  Their Gallery is over Lane & Tucker’s Store, Pennsylvania avenue, between 4½ and 6th street.

Give them a call and you will find that “seeing is believing.”  jan 26.

The fourth advertisement ran from February 8 to March 30, 1854. Metropolitan Gallery.—We cannot too highly recommend to the notice of our readers the beautiful Stereoscope Miniatures made by Messrs. Adams & Dunshee, successors to Thompson.  They are practical Daguerreotypist and fully understand the business which is evident from an inspection of their productions.  They give to their subjects an easy natural position, the right tone of complexion, harmonize the lights, manage the reflections, soften the shadows, and in fact give you a Daguerreotype which cannot be equaled in this city, in proof of which they will be happy to make a picture of any person, free of expense, who would like to test their skill in comparison with rival establishments.

Remember the “Metropolitan Gallery,” formerly Thompson’s, Pa. avenue, bet. 4½ and 6th sts.

Both George Adams and Edward S. Dunshee are recorded in other photographic directories, but not as partners or as being active in Washington, D. C.

Knight C. Woodley

1858-1859       312 E Street, near Willards’, Washington, D. C.

1859                Opposite the Star Office, Pennsylvania Avenue & 11 Street, Washington, D. C.

1860                288½ Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.[1]

Knight C. Woodley was recorded in five advertisements and fourth announcements in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  The first advertisement ran from June 14 to November 23, 1858.  Portraits For The Million.—A perfect Portrait of yourself for 25 cents, warranted not to fade.  2,000 of these beautiful pictures made by Woodley in nine weeks.  No charge unless the sitter is perfectly satisfied.  Pictures on paper for 50 cents, which can be sent by mail without extra charge.  Every variety of cases kept on hand.  Sun light not required. 

K. C. Woodley, Photographer, No. 312 E. Street, near Willards.                             

The second advertisement ran from August 7 to 11, 1858.  Call At Scott’s Bookstore On Pa. avenue, between 14th and 16th streets, and get a dollar Book and a Daguerreotype for only one dollar….Daguerreotypes will be taken by that excellent artist E. N. Lewis, at Mrs. Redmond’s Gallery, No. 12 Market Space, and by R. C. Woodley, 312 E street.                                                     

The first announcement appeared on October 30, 1858.  Sun Painting.—Woodley, No. 312 E. Street, continues to take those really superior portraits for a quarter of a dollar.  His gallery is thronged from morning until night and he continues to give satisfaction to all his numerous patrons.  Those who wish a likeness in any style of the varied branches of Photographic art, should not omit to give him a call.

The third advertisement ran from November 24 to December 24, 1858.  A Question.—Why do the public from all parts of the city go to Woodley’s Gallery for Portraits?  Because they can there obtain a perfect likeness for 25 cents and upwards, and no charge unless the sitter is perfectly satisfied.

K. C. Woodley wishes to return thanks to his numerous patrons for the very liberal support he has met with, and hopes by strict attention to his profession to merit a continuance of their patronage.

K. C. W. wishes to inform the public that he has made great improvements at his Gallery, which is well warmed and made all snug for the Winter season.  On hand, a good assortment of Cases of the latest design, for Christmas presents.  K. C. Woodley, 312 E. Street, near Willards’ no. 24.

The second announcement appeared on December 24, 1858.  For life-like ambrotypes go to Sand’s and Woodley’s.

The third announcement appeared on January 5, 1859.  By The Advertisement elsewhere it will be seen that some thieves are “taking ambrotypes” from Woodley in a style not satisfactory to that artist.  Among the missing pictures is one of a pretty young bride, perhaps stolen by some rejected lover, who seizes the shadow in lieu of the original.

The fourth advertisement appeared on January 5, 1859.  $10 Reward.—Stolen from Woodley’s Gallery, at different times recently, six fine Ambrotypes—one stolen this morning.  The above reward will be paid on conviction of one of the petty thieves.                                                                                                                     

The fifth advertisement ran from January 24 to December 28, 1859.  Ambrotypes.—Small Profits And Quick Returns.  Portraits, framed 25 cents.  Any size Portraits warranted in best cases or frames at N. York prices.  Come all, and take a sitting for one of those beautiful Pictures, and obtain the ocular proofs, at K. C. Woodley’s Gallery, Pennsylvania avenue, bet. 13th and 14th streets, near Willard’s.                               

The fourth announcement appeared on June 21, 1859.  Woodley, photographer, has found his business increasing to the extent of demanding the opening of a branch establishment opposite the Star office.  See his flag.

Knight C. Woodley is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Washington, D. C. in 1860 at 288½ Pennsylvania Avenue.


[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

J. J. Woodbridge

1854                Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets, Washington, D. C.

J. J. Woodbridge was recorded in nine advertisements between May 25 to July 1, 1854 in the   Daily Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  The first appeared on May 25, 1854.  Twenty-Five Cent Daguerreotypes—As it is well known that at J. J. Woodbridge’s New York Gallery is the only place where you can get a good likeness for twenty-five cents, he feels well assured that he will receive his share of patronage.  His Room is on Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th street, over Gilman’s Drug Store.  Also Rooms to let.  Enquire at the Daguerrean Room.                       

The second appeared on June 3, 1854.  Twenty-Five Cent Daguerreotypes.  We are happy to say that our custom is increasing daily at the New York Picture Gallery between 6th and 7th streets; and why is it?  It is because people begin to find out there is no use of paying large prices for a daguerreotype when they can get them at J. J. Woodbridge’s, put up in a very neat style for 25 cents.  Rooms to let; enquire at the Daguerrean Rooms.                            

The third appeared on June 9, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes Now is the time to get good likenesses for twenty-five cents; and how pleasing it is to look at the daguerreotype of some absent friend when they are so correct and life-like as those taken at J. J. Woodbridge’s New York Gallery.  Rooms Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store.  Also, Rooms to let.  Enquire at the Daguerrean Room.                 

The fourth appeared on June 14, 1854.  Wake Up, Washingtonians!  For Now Is The Time To Get Splendid Daguerreotypes for only 25 Cent, and taken at no other place than J. J. Woodbridge’s New York Picture Gallery, under the control of Prof. Stiltz, late of Whitehurst’s Baltimore Gallery, and one who will give every satisfaction.  Beautiful electorene pictures are also taken at the same place over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pa. av., between 6th and 7th streets.

The fifth appeared on June 20, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  Since Professor Stiltz has taken charge of the New York Daguerrean Gallery, over Gilman’s Drug Store, things go on finely; every picture is a perfect gem, and the rooms are crowded daily, for those beautiful electorene pictures, taken by the new French process.  Every picture warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  Now is your chance.  J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.

The sixth appeared on June 24, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  We ever continue to please our very numerous friends and acquaintances with perfect likenesses for only 25 cents, taken by the new French process, by which we are enabled to take from three to four hundred pictures daily.  If our friends call at J. J. Woodbridge’s, Pa. av., betw. 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, we will assure perfect satisfaction.  D. R. Stiltz, J. J. Woodbridge, Prop’r.

The seventh appeared on June 27, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The friends and acquaintances of J. J. Woodbridge had better take advantage of this fine weather, and call to have a picture taken by the world renowned new French method, by which we can take a perfect resemblance in this space of ten minutes.  D. R. Stiltz.  J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.  

The eighth appeared on June 29, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great Electorene Daguerrean Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, a French operator just from Paris, and between Prof. Stewart and Stiltz we will guarantee to give every one satisfaction, at the old stand.  J. J. Woodbridge, Pa. avenue, between 6th and 7th sts., over Gilman’s Drug Store.

The ninth appeared on July 1, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The New York Picture Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking the Electorene Pictures by the new French process, and by it we can take your picture in a few seconds, while you can sit in one of the coolest rooms in the rooms in the city until it is finished.  Profs Stewart and Stiltz guarantees to suit all who may give us a call.  We can take 400 on the 4th of July.  The only place where you can get them is on Pennsylvania avenue, between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of Prof. Woodbridge.

J. J. Woodbridge is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Washington, D. C.  It is possible that this is John J. Woodbridge who was active in New York City, North Carolina, Baltimore, Maryland, and Cincinnati, Ohio. D. R. Stiltz may have followed Woodbridge to Baltimore?

Henry Willard

Ca. 1855          Address Unknown, Boston, Massachusetts

1855                Pennsylvania Avenue, between 4½ and 6th Streets, Washington, D. C.

Henry Willard was recorded in two announcements in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  The first appeared on December 18, 1855.  Henry Willard, a Boston artist of great merit, has taken a studio in the same building with Whitehurst’s Daguerreotype establishment, where he is painting the portraits of several of our distinguished men.

The second announcement appeared on December 22, 1855.  Fine Arts.—Visiting several studios this morning, we found the artists busy at their easels, apparently well content with the patronage they are receiving from an appreciating public…  Henry Willard, in the building with Vannerson, was at work on a portrait, in oils, of the Hon. Mr. De Witt, of Mass….

The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1564–1860 list Henry Willard as a portrait, miniature and genre painter of Boston, active from about 1833.

Henry Willard is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerrean Registry does record a William Willard as an artist at 5½ Tremont Row.  Both Henry and William are recorded in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1564–1860. William  as a portrait painter active in Boston in the 1850’s and Henry as a portrait, miniature, and genre painter.  It is unknown what arrangements Henry had with Whitehurst or Vannerson if he was just using the gallery space as professional courtesy or if money exchanged hands or if Henry colored or painted photographs.  In the case of William it is unknow if he work for Southworth & Hawes or had his own space in the building.

Van Loan & Son

1848                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

Van Loan & Son were recorded in one announcement in the New York Herald (New York, New York) on July 6, 1848.  Washington National .Monument Celebration…

A full sized American living eagle was placed on the summit of the Masonic arch, and appeared from his proud look to be fully entitled to his position.  Mr. Van Loan and son occupied the same conspicuous elevation for some time, in daguerreotyping the scene.

Van Loan & Son are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Matthew D. Van Loan had three children, it is possible that this is Matthew and one of his sons.  Two of the children have been identified as Walton and Spencer the name of the third child is unknown at this time. 

Van Loan & Chase

1846-1847       Pennsylvania Avenue, next door to the U. S. Hotel, Washington, D. C.

Van Loan & Chase were recorded in two Advertisements and four announcements, one advertisement and two announcements in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) and one advertisement and two announcements in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  The first advertisement ran from December 19, 1846 to February 8, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance free.  Next door to the United States Hotel.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m., till 5 o’clock, p. m.               

The first announcement appeared in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) on December 31, 1846.  We would call the attention of citizens and strangers to the daguerreotype establishment of Messrs. Van Loan & Chase, next door to the United States Hotel.

The second advertisement ran from April 30 to June 1, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance Fee—next door to the U. S. Hotel.

Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m. till 5 o’clock p. m.. Washington, 1847.  april 14.

The second announcement appeared on May 26, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  A Chinese Painting.  To the Editor of the Union.  Sir:  I request a small space in your valuable paper whilst I employ it in inviting the attention of the regular artists, the amateur, and the curious, to the inspection of an extraordinary and beautifully executed painting—the genuine production of a Chinaman by the name of Sunqua.  The picture, five feet in length and two-and-a-half in breadth, may be seen at the Daguerreotype rooms of Mr. Van Loan, next door to the United States Hotel, Washington City. This picture represents the town of Canton in the Celestial Empire….

The third announcement appeared on June 9, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.) Washington As It Is.  June, 1847, Pennsylvania Avenue.  No. II.

Crossing Third street, westwardly, westwardly, on the North side of Pennsylvania avenue…Next Door westward of the United States Hotel is a spacious and lofty building belonging to John Donoho, at present partly occupied by Van Loan & Chase’s admirable Daguerrean rooms.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 28, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  We are indebted to Messrs. Brooke, Shillington, & Co., of this city, for a “View of the Battle of Buena Vista,” published by H. R. Robinson….We are also presented with a fine lithographic portrait of Col. Charles May, from a daguerreotype of Van Loan & Co., of this city.  This is also published by Mr. Robinson of New York….

Van Loan & Chase are not recorded in other photographic directories.  While their first names are not recorded in the announcements or advertisements other photographic directories may shed light into who they may be.  The advertisement reads “Van Loan & Chase, From New York & Philadelphia.”  Based on the order in the advertisement Van Loan would be from New York and Chase from Philadelphia.  To date the only Van Loan working in New York City would be Matthew D. Van Loan while Samuel Van Loan is active in Philadelphia, there is no record of him being active in New York.  Further research on a genealogy site revealed the following.  He was reared in [Catskill, N. Y.] and educated in the common schools. In 1841 he went to New York City and opened a daguerreotype studio, being the first man in the United States to make a business of producing portraits by the new process. He continued taking pictures for ten years in New York, and from there went to Philadelphia and later to Washington, engaging in the same business. Subsequently and up to the time of his death, in 1856, he was employed in the custom-house in San Francisco.   While Chase is a common name, it is possibly he is Theodore L. Chase who was active in Philadelphia in 1846-1847. 

Henry W. Turner

1859                480 Pennsylvania Avenue, Near Third Street, Washington, D. C.

Henry W. Turner was recorded in one advertisement that ran from April 23 to October 11, 1859 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  New Photograph And Ambrotype Gallery, 480 Pennsylvania Avenue, near Third Street.  Ambrotypes, Ambrotypes, only 25 cents, Put up in handsome case.

Photographs, Photographs, only One Dollar for the finest copy, and 25 cents for each subsequent one.

Good Pictures taken in any weather.

Remember the Number 380 Pennsylvania avenue, near 3d street.

“Secure the shadow while you have the substance.”                                                

Henry W. Turner is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Washington, D. C. in 1860.

John Tobias

1859                426 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

John Tobias was recorded in one advertisement that ran from February 18 to December 28, 1859 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  Tobias, Optician, 426 Penn. Avenue, Bet 4½ And 6th Sts….Tobias’ Ambrotype Rooms, Where you will obtain a good likeness, equal to any other Establishment, and at moderate charges.                                                                                   

John Tobias is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1860.

J. L. Thompson

1853                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

J. L. Thompson was recorded in one announcement in the Daily Evening Star (Washington, D.C.) on March 25, 1853.  Awards of the Metropolitan Mechanics’ Institute….

Messrs. Whitehurst, daguerreotypes—medal. 

M. A. Root, daguerreotypes—medal. 

J. L. Thompson, daguerreotypes—first diploma.

J. L. Thompson is not listed in other photographic directories.  It is possible this is Edwin C. Thompson who was active in Washington, D. C. Between 4½ and 6th Streets.  His first advertisement dated January 21, 1852 and his last ran from November 12, 1853 to January 14, 1854.  On January 12, 1854 an advertisement appears for Adams & Dunshee who say that they have purchased the establishment from Thompson, on July 22, 1854 the studio once again changed hands when Vannerson purchased it.

Frank Steel Tallmadge

1854-55           Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, District of Columbia.

Frank Steel Tallmadge was mentioned in five advertisement in three different newspapers.   The first advertisement ran from August 22 to 26, 1854 in the Daily Evening Star (Washington D. C.)

25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city is at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge, Pa. avenue, where you can get a most perfect and life-like likeness, beautifully colored and finished for the small sum of 25 cents.  We have two of the best operators in the United States.  While the polite and gentlemanly attendance of Prof. Frank Steel Tallmadge, makes it agreeable to all who may wish to favor us with their patronage.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.

The second advertisement ran from October 24 to 26, 1854 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city where you can get

A likeness, a perfect gem for the small price of 25 cents, beautifully colored and finished.  Prof. F. Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York with a varied and beautiful assortment of plain, gilt, oval, velvet, pearl, papier mache, Jenny Lind, and Sontag Cases, selected by him expressly for Mr. Stewart’s Gallery.  Perfect satisfaction warranted in all cases.

Gallery directly over M. W. Galt & Bro’s Jewelry Store, on Penna. Avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.                                                   

The third advertisement ran from October 31 to November 4, 1854 in the Evening Star  (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city where you can get A likeness, a perfect gem for the small price of 25 cents, beautifully colored and finished.  Prof. F. Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York with a varied and beautiful assortment of plain, gilt, oval, velvet, pearl, papier mache, Jenny Lind, and Sontag Cases, selected by him expressly for Mr. Stewart’s Gallery.  Perfect satisfaction warranted in all cases.

Gallery directly over M. W. Galt & Bro’s Jewelry Store, on Penna. avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.                                                    

The third Advertisement ran from December 2 to 5, 1854 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  N. B.—Nobody’s business if we take an elegant and well finished Picture for the extremely small and insignificant sum of 25 cents, giving satisfaction to every body.  Prof. Frank Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York, having selected a most beautiful assortment of Plain, Double Gilt, Papier Mache, Velvet, Pearl, Oval and Fancy Cases, &c., &c, selected expressly for Stewart’s Gallery, which in price we defy competition.  Remember we are the only opposition gallery in Washington.  If the public will give us a call we will ensure the most perfect satisfaction.  Gallery over M. W. Galt’s Jewelry Store, Penna. Avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.   C. D. Stewart, Proprietor.                                        

The fifth advertisement ran from January 31 to February 2, 1855 in the Daily American Organ (Washington, D. C.) Sebastopol Not Taken!  But numerous quantities of those beautiful Daguerreotypes are taken every day, unsurpassable in tone, finish, &c.  We have a Sky-Light, which, for softness of light, is not equaled in the United States; this, coupled with Prof. F. S. Talmadge’s long experience in several of the leading galleries in Boston and New York, renders it hardly probable for us to get a poor picture.

All we ask is for the public to call and satisfy themselves.

Pictures for 25 cents and upwards.

Gallery on Pennsylvania avenue, between Ninth and tenth streets, over Galt’s Jewelry Store.  C. D. Stewart, Proprietor.                                                                      

Frank Steel Tallmadge is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Talmage active in Washington, D. C. in 1857, it is possible they are the same person.