Tag Archives: Washington D. C.

Dr. Lover

1856                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

Dr. Lover was recorded in an announcement on September 12, 1856 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C).  Photographs By Gas Light.—Dr. Lover, the well-known artisan, has devised an apparatus for taking photographs by gas light. The main feature being the introduction of a stream of oxygen into the flame of common coal gas which had been previously made to pass through cotton and naptha, with the view of surcharging it with carbon, so as to increase the brilliancy on the admission of the oxygen.

Dr. Lover is not recorded in other photographic directories.

E. N. Lewis

1858                12 Market Space, Washington, D. C.

E. N. Lewis was recorded in one advertisement that ran from August 7 to 11, 1858 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) Call At Scott’s Bookstore On Pa. avenue, between 14th and 16th streets, and get a dollar Book and a Daguerreotype for only one dollar….Daguerreotypes will be taken by that excellent artist E. N. Lewis, at Mrs. Redmond’s Gallery, No. 12 Market Space, and by R. C. Woodley, 312 E street.

E. N. Lewis is not recorded in other photographic directories. Mrs. A. C. Redmond is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry. R. C. Woodley is probably Knight C. Woodley, who is also recorded in Craig’s.

C. A. Johnston

1856                [8th Street and Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D. C.]

C. A. Johnston was recorded in two announcements. The first appeared on July 30, 1856 in the Daily American Organ (Washington, District of Columbia). Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of 8th street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred to the Committee on Police.

The second announcement appeared on July 31, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of eighth street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred.

C. A. Johnston does not appear in other photographic directories. There is a possibility that C. A. Johnston is Mr. Johnson a daguerrean in Richmond, Virginia with traveling daguerreotype wagons (entry posted on 9-4-19.) There is no indication that the petition was approved.

Mr. Johnson

1856-1857       Wagons on the Corner of 7th & Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia.

Mr. Johnson was recorded in seven announcements and six advertisements in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virgini).  The first announcement appeared on March 28, 1856.  Daguerreotype Wagons.—Two of Johnson’s Wagons, No. 7 and 10, are now in Richmond, corner of 7th and Broad streets, built with best lights.  Johnson himself, with twelve years’ experience, is operating in them.  Brilliant and highly finished likenesses for Fifty Cents and One Dollar—half the usual prices.  Go early to avoid the crowd.

The second announcement appeared on March 31, 1856.  Fathers!  Mothers!  Brothers!  Sisters!  Friends!—Go to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one of his fifty cents or dollar likenesses.

The third announcement appeared on April 1, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad sts., and get one or two to give to your friends.

The fourth announcement appeared on April 2, 1856.  A Word to the Wise, &c.—Two of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons are now corner of 7th and Broad streets.  The superior lights enable him to take good pictures in any kind of weather.  His work is of the best style; he has been many years at it.  Reduced prices, fifty cents and one dollar.

The fifth announcement appeared on April 3, 1856.  Why do you Dress so nicely to get Your Likeness?—Go just as you are to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get on of his Fifty Cent or Dollar pictures.  He will make your cloths look equal to the best.

The sixth announcement appeared on April 4, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The first announcement ran from April 5 to May 29, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The seventh announcement appeared on April 8, 1856.  Wanted.—Two Horses and a Driver for a little more than one hour a day, for which one dollar each day will be paid.  Apply to Mr. Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets.

The second advertisement ran from May 1 to June 4, 1856.  A Book For Nothing!  Instructions Gratis!—Go to the Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two of Johnson’s 50 cent or dollar pictures for your friends; and he will give you his Treatise on daguerreotyping and Photography, by which you may learn the various processes used in the art.  Remember his prices are low.  He does a large business can sell cheap.  Johnson with his assistants take a very large number of Daguerreotypes daily.  He can, therefore, sell you larger pictures for 50 Cents and One Dollar, than you can get elsewhere; they are in the best style.  He has been many years in the business.  Good pictures taken in any kind of weather, as the lights in the wagons are built for the purpose.  Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad streets.

The third advertisement ran from May 12 to 14, 1856.  Five Operators, with extra Apparatus, and another of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, will be engaged during the holidays, so that visitors will not be delayed.  Those desiring good and cheap pictures will do well to embrace this opportunity, as Johnson’s stay in this city is now very limited.  For the quality of the pictures, he refers to the twelve hundred ladies and gentlemen who have patronized him in Richmond.  Price Fifty Cents, One Dollar and upwards.   Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad Streets.

The fourth advertisement ran from June 17 to 19, 1856.   A Good Business Chance.—One of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons with apparatus complete, for-sale cheap.  It is now doing a good business.  And one of Johnson’s operators would remain with the purchaser for a time, if required, and could thoroughly instruct him in the art.  For terms, &c. enquire at the Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad Streets.

The fifth advertisement ran from June 11 to November 6, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The sixth Advertisement ran from December 13, 1856 to January 28, 1857.  Many Thousand Likenesses have been taken this year in Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad streets.  Go and get one of his 50 cents or dollar pictures, and you will be pleased with it.

Mr. Johnson does not appear in other photographic directories as being active in Richmond, Virginia.  Further research is needed on this daguerreotypist, he claims to have twelve years’ experience (ca. 1844) and has a number of traveling daguerreotype wagons.  So far these are the only announcements/advertisements found, or anyone by name Johnson with a daguerreian wagon(s). There are several Johnson’s who were active in the early 1840’s but to suggest them would be pure speculation.  A listing for C. A. Johnston (will be posted on 9-10-19) appears on July 30 & 31, 1856 were he is asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon in Washington, D. C. Its possible they are the same person based on the proximity to Richmond the dates of the announcements and spelling variant of his last name.

H. Hayer

1854                Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets,                               Washington, D. C.

H. Hayer was recorded in an advertisement that ran on July 15, i854 in the Daily Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) 25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great New York Picture Gallery is flourishing rapidly.  After the departure of Hayer, it has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking those beautiful pictures by the new French process.  I have in my employ Prof. Stiltz, who is not only one of the best daguerrean artist in the United States but in the world, and we guaranted to suit all who may favor us with a call in Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge.

H. Hayer is not recorded in other photographic directories. Nor is Prof. Stewart or Prof. Stiltz. John J. Woodbridge is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City, New Bern, North Carolina, Baltimore, Maryland, and Cincinnati, Ohio.

N. H. Hammond

1849                First Street, corner Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia.

N. H. Hammond was recorded in an advertisement that ran from May 7 to 15, 1849.  in The Daily National Whig (Washington, D. C.).  Daguerreotype Likenesses.  N. H. Hammond would respectfully announce to the citizens and strangers of Washington that he has purchased the Daguerreotype stock of George & Hammond, and will, at the request of numerous friends, remain at their old stand corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and First street, One More Week.

Hundreds are witnesses that they can obtain better and cheaper likenesses at this establishment than are often obtained.  Please call and satisfy yourselves.

N. H. Hammond is not recorded in other photographic directories.

G. W. Granniss

1856                352 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

G. W. Granniss was recorded in an advertisement as part of the partnership of Root & Granniss. The advertisement ran from July 29 to August 11, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Root & Granniss, M. A. Root.  G. N. Granniss Photographic, Ambrotype, and Daguerrean Gallery.  Is Now Open At No. 352 Pennsylvania avenue, near Seventh street, where Photographs, colored or plain; Ambrotypes tinted and colored, new style; and Daguerreotypes, are taken in the highest perfection of the art.

The Public are respectfully invited to visit our Gallery whether desiring pictures or not.

G. W. Granniss is not recorded in other photographic directories.

George

1849                First Street, Corner Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.  C.

George was recorded in two advertisements in the partnership of George and Hammond.  The first advertisement ran from February 8 to March 16, 1849 in The Daily National Whig (Washington, D. C.).  George & Hammond, Daguerreotypists, first door on First street, corner of Pennsylvania avenue, near the Capitol, thankful for past favors, would respectfully announce to the ladies and gentlemen of this city and vicinity, that they intend leaving in a very short time for California.

And having on hand a large Daguerreotype stock, which they are desirous to close up before leaving, would give notice to those who may give them an early call, that they have one very neat  style which they would put up for One Dollar.

Customers may be sure of finding, at this establishment, every desirable style of case.  The latest patterns of Gold Lockets furnished and Miniatures neatly set at reasonable prices.

The second advertisement ran from March 28 to April 27, 1849.  The Daily National Whig (Washington, District of Columbia).  George & Hammond, Daguerreotypists, Corner First Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, near the Capitol, Would respectfully announced to the citizens and strangers of Washington that all who wish to secure a correct and cheap Daguerreotype from their establishment must call immediately, as they will positively leave the city in a few days.  A very neat article put up for $1,00.

All should help sustain that art which keeps the absent near;                                                              The beautiful unchanged from Time’s rude theft—                                                                          Guards the fresh tint of childhood’s polished brow,                                                                            And when love yields its idol to the tomb                                                                                                    Doth snatch a copy.

George, and N. H. Hammond are not recorded in other city directories.

Samuel A. Cohner

1857                380 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

Samuel A. Cohner was recorded in The Photographic and Fine Art Journal (New York, New York) on December 1857.  Washington Galleries.  Washington November 5, 1857.    Mr. James McCleese of Philadelphia, has opened his new gallery below the Kirkwood House.  His operator is Samuel A. Cohner, Esq., a practical chemist of some notoriety; he is very successful in all of his operations.  I was shown many of his beautiful plain photographs, that in tone and sharpness were exquisite.  But ‘tis just like Mr. McC., he never has any body about who does not fully understand his business.  His gallery is one of the finest in Washington, and the many water colored pictures that are adorning his walls, speak highly for the business.  His artists is a man of the first order and paints with unusual rapidity.  Mr. Vannerson is the agent of Mr. McClesse’s gallery, and for the length of time he has resided in Washington, no man is more capable of doing the agreeable in securing the public patronage.  This gallery will do a large share of the business the coming winter.  I fully predict a brilliant career for them, and well they deserve it.  By the time your next number appears, I hope to be able to speak more of this gallery.

Samuel A. Cohner is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Professor J. Edwin Churchill

1856                434 Pennsylvania Avenue, Between 4½ and 6th Streets, Washington, D. C. 1857                Address and Location Unknown

Professor J. Edwin Churchill was recorded in two announcements, the first on September 6, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  ….Prof. J. E. Churchill, the distinguished American artist, is in this city.  Some of his exquisite specimens of photographs in oil, among which is a fine likeness of Mrs. Julia Dean Hayne, may be seen at Whitehurst’s gallery.

The second on August 26, 1857 in the same paper.  Prof. J. E. Churchill has just finished a fine photographic portrait in oil, of President Buchanan.

According to The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in America 1564-1860 J. Edwin Churchill is recorded as a portrait painted in Philadelphia in 1860.