Tag Archives: Washington D. C.

Frank Steel Tallmadge

1854-55           Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, District of Columbia.

Frank Steel Tallmadge was mentioned in five advertisement in three different newspapers.   The first advertisement ran from August 22 to 26, 1854 in the Daily Evening Star (Washington D. C.)

25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city is at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge, Pa. avenue, where you can get a most perfect and life-like likeness, beautifully colored and finished for the small sum of 25 cents.  We have two of the best operators in the United States.  While the polite and gentlemanly attendance of Prof. Frank Steel Tallmadge, makes it agreeable to all who may wish to favor us with their patronage.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.

The second advertisement ran from October 24 to 26, 1854 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city where you can get

A likeness, a perfect gem for the small price of 25 cents, beautifully colored and finished.  Prof. F. Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York with a varied and beautiful assortment of plain, gilt, oval, velvet, pearl, papier mache, Jenny Lind, and Sontag Cases, selected by him expressly for Mr. Stewart’s Gallery.  Perfect satisfaction warranted in all cases.

Gallery directly over M. W. Galt & Bro’s Jewelry Store, on Penna. Avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.                                                   

The third advertisement ran from October 31 to November 4, 1854 in the Evening Star  (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The cheapest, best, and only place in the city where you can get A likeness, a perfect gem for the small price of 25 cents, beautifully colored and finished.  Prof. F. Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York with a varied and beautiful assortment of plain, gilt, oval, velvet, pearl, papier mache, Jenny Lind, and Sontag Cases, selected by him expressly for Mr. Stewart’s Gallery.  Perfect satisfaction warranted in all cases.

Gallery directly over M. W. Galt & Bro’s Jewelry Store, on Penna. avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.  C. D. Stewart, Prop’r.                                                    

The third Advertisement ran from December 2 to 5, 1854 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  N. B.—Nobody’s business if we take an elegant and well finished Picture for the extremely small and insignificant sum of 25 cents, giving satisfaction to every body.  Prof. Frank Steel Talmadge has just returned from New York, having selected a most beautiful assortment of Plain, Double Gilt, Papier Mache, Velvet, Pearl, Oval and Fancy Cases, &c., &c, selected expressly for Stewart’s Gallery, which in price we defy competition.  Remember we are the only opposition gallery in Washington.  If the public will give us a call we will ensure the most perfect satisfaction.  Gallery over M. W. Galt’s Jewelry Store, Penna. Avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets.   C. D. Stewart, Proprietor.                                        

The fifth advertisement ran from January 31 to February 2, 1855 in the Daily American Organ (Washington, D. C.) Sebastopol Not Taken!  But numerous quantities of those beautiful Daguerreotypes are taken every day, unsurpassable in tone, finish, &c.  We have a Sky-Light, which, for softness of light, is not equaled in the United States; this, coupled with Prof. F. S. Talmadge’s long experience in several of the leading galleries in Boston and New York, renders it hardly probable for us to get a poor picture.

All we ask is for the public to call and satisfy themselves.

Pictures for 25 cents and upwards.

Gallery on Pennsylvania avenue, between Ninth and tenth streets, over Galt’s Jewelry Store.  C. D. Stewart, Proprietor.                                                                      

Frank Steel Tallmadge is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Talmage active in Washington, D. C. in 1857, it is possible they are the same person.

D. R. Stiltz

N. D.               Address Unknown, Baltimore, Maryland.

1854                Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets, Washington, District of Columbia.

1856                159 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

1858                82 South Sharp, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

1859                244 Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

D. R. Stiltz was recorded in nine advertisements in the Daily Evening Star (Washington, D. C.). The first advertisement appeared in June 14, 1854.  Wake Up, Washingtonians!  For Now Is The Time To Get Splendid Daguerreotypes for only 25 Cent, and taken at no other place than J. J. Woodbridge’s New York Picture Gallery, under the control of Prof. Stiltz, late of Whitehurst’s Baltimore Gallery, and one who will give every satisfaction.  Beautiful electorene pictures are also taken at the same place over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pa. av., between 6th and 7th streets.

The second advertisement appeared on June 20, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  Since Professor Stiltz has taken charge of the New York Daguerrean Gallery, over Gilman’s Drug Store, things go on finely; every picture is a perfect gem, and the rooms are crowded daily, for those beautiful electorene pictures, taken by the new French process.  Every picture warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  Now is your chance. J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.

The third ad appeared on June 24, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  We ever continue to please our very numerous friends and acquaintances with perfect likenesses for only 25 cents, taken by the new French process, by which we are enabled to take from three to four hundred pictures daily.  If our friends call at J. J. Woodbridge’s, Pa. av., betw. 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, we will assure perfect satisfaction.  D. R. Stiltz,  J. J. Woodbridge, Prop’r.

The fourth ad appeared on June 27, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The friends and acquaintances of J. J. Woodbridge had better take advantage of this fine weather, and call to have a picture taken by the world renowned new French method, by which we can take a perfect resemblance in this space of ten minutes. D. R. Stiltz.  J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.  

The fifth ad appeared on June 29, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great Electorene Daguerrean Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, a French operator just from Paris, and between Prof. Stewart and Stiltz we will guarantee to give every one satisfaction, at the old stand.  J. J. Woodbridge, Pa. avenue, between 6th and 7th sts., over Gilman’s Drug Store.

The sixth ad appeared on July 1, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The New York Picture Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking the Electorene Pictures by the new French process, and by it we can take your picture in a few seconds, while you can sit in one of the coolest rooms in the rooms in the city until it is finished.  Profs Stewart and Stiltz guarantees to suit all who may give us a call.  We can take 400 on the 4th of July.  The only place where you can get them is on Pennsylvania avenue, between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of Prof. Woodbridge.

The seventh advertisement appeared on July 8, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  Young America In Its Full Bloom.—Profs. Stewart and Stiltz are still taking those beautiful Electorine Daguerreotypes by the new French process.  Come one, come all, we guarantee to suite those who may give us a call, on Pennsylvania avenue, between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store.

We have two rooms to rent on the second floor, at the old gallery of Prof. J. J. Woodbridge.          

The eighth ad appeared on July 10, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great New York Picture Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking those beautiful Electorine Pictures by the new French process.  I have in my employ Prof.  Stiltz, who is not only one of the best operators in the United States, who for a long time been operating in one of the finest Gallery’s in Baltimore for Prof. Woodbridge.   My Gallery is on Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge.                          

The ninth ad appeared on July 15, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great New York Picture Gallery is flourishing rapidly.  After the departure of Hayer, it has fallen into the hands of Prof Stewart, who is taking those beautiful pictures by the new French process.  I have in my employ Prof.  Stiltz, who is not only one of the best daguerrean artist in the United States but in the world, and we guaranteed to suit all who may favor us with a call in Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge.              

D. R. Stiltz is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, Maryland from 1856 to 1859.Ross Kelbaugh in Directory Of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900 list Stiltz in Baltimore until 1864 and in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1875.


[1] Directory Of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900.

Smith

1859                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

Smith in the partnership of Bryant & Smith was recorded in an announcement June 14, 1859 in the Evening Star.  (Washington, D. C.)  From The photographers & publishers, Messrs. Bryant & Smith, we have six photographic (stereoscopic) views of scenes in and about Washington, which, for excellence of execution, are quite equal to the best French stereoscopic views.  They consist of representations of the Patent Office, Washington Monument, Jackson Statute, White House, Capitol extension, (east front,) and the tomb of Washington.  They are for sale by Franklin Philp.

Smith is recorded in the partnership of Bryant & Smith in Washington, D. C. in The World Of Stereographs by William C. Derrah.

Mrs. A. C. Redmond

1855                290 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.                                                            1855-1856     401 Seventh Street, Washington, D. C.                                                                          1858-1859     12 Market Space, between 8th & 9th Streets, Washington, D. C.

Mrs. A. C. Redmond was recorded in six advertisements and two announcements in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  The first advertisement ran from August 6 to September 24, 1855.  Mrs. A. C. Redmond’s New Gallery of Daguerrean Art and Photographing is at 290 Pa. avenue, northeast corner of 11th street, over Ford & Bro’s Drug Store, Washington.

Pictures taken at 50 cents and upwards.                                                                                                      Mrs. R. is a graduate of Whitehurst’s establishment.

The first announcement appeared on September 26, 1855.  Worthy of Patronage.—Those desiring daguerreotype pictures cannot do better than to patronize the establishment of Mrs. Redmond, on the corner of Pennsylvania avenue and eleventh street, over the Drug store of the Brothers Ford.  The proprietress, Mrs. Redmond, executes her pictures capitally, and especially deserves encouragement from those who are blessed with true public spirit.  We have satisfied our self that she is a very worthy widow, with a family of three children depending on her exertions, and that the duty of paying for her establishment has forced her to deny herself almost the bare necessities of life during nearly the whole of the late dull term in the way of business.  If industry and determined perseverance to discharge pecuniary obligations amid crushing difficulties and pinching want deserve encouragement, surely here is a case in which those who are truly benevolent and public spirited cannot do better than to patronize the daguerreotyping establishment in question.

The second advertisement ran from November 22, 1855 to January 21, 1856.  Daguerreotypes Taken By A Lady.  Mrs. A. C. Redmond Having removed to her new rooms, on 7th st., between H and I, is prepared to take Likenesses in the best style of the art.

Pictures well taken and put up in embossed cases for Fifty Cents.

The second announcement appeared on July 10, 1856.  Daguerreotypes.—Those in want of good Daguerreotypes should call at the establishment of Mrs. A. C. Redmond, 401 Seventh street.  Her pictures are well executed, and her prices suit the times.

The third advertisement ran from July 10 to 16, 1856.  Mrs. A. C. Redmond’s Sky-Light Daguerrean Gallery.  No. 401 Seventh street, above H, west side.

Portraits Taken Equally Well in Fair and Cloudy Weather.  Particular attention paid to copying Daguerreotypes, Oil paintings, &c.  Pictures of Deceased Persons taken and made to resemble life.  Mrs. R. solicits the patronage of the Ladies particularly.

The fourth advertisement appeared on December 2, 1856.  Mrs. A. C. Redmond’s Skylight daguerrean Rooms, Seventh street, west side, between H and I sts.

Mrs. A. C. R. Wishes To say To The public that she is now making beautiful Ambrotypes from one dollar up to any price requires.  Daguerreotypes put up in embossed cases for fifty cents, which are usually sold elsewhere for one dollar.  Her expenses on Seventh street being much less than on the Avenue, she is enabled to sell her Pictures at a greatly reduced price.

Mrs. R. respectfully requests the patronage of the ladies.

The fifth advertisement ran from August 7 to 11, 1858.  Call At Scott’s Bookstore On Pa. avenue, between 14th and 16th streets, and get a dollar Book and a Daguerreotype for only one dollar….Daguerreotypes will be taken by that excellent artist E. N. Lewis, at Mrs. Redmond’s Gallery, No. 12 Market Space, and by R. C. Woodley, 312 E street.

The sixth advertisement ran on April 1 & 2, 1859.  Ladies Daguerrean Rooms, Market Space, No. 12, bet. 8th and 9th sts.  If you want an excellent Ambrotype, call at Mrs. A. C. Redmond’s and obtain one.  Likeness to please, or no pay.

Ladies, your patronage is respectfully solicited.

Mrs. A. C. Redmond is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  The above provides extended activity dates, addresses and additional information.

Mrs. M. E. Phipps

1859                515 7th Street, between D & E Streets.

Mrs. M. E. Phipps was recorded in an advertisement that ran from March 30 to April 1, 1859  in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)

Light!  Light!!  Light Shines forth, pure and bright,                                                                                       Where the image of man and maiden are taken,                                                                                          To gladden the heart and ravish the sight;                                                                                                      Are taken, fine and neat,                                                                                                                                          Come, see for yourselves, and be not miss-taken;                                                                                      Just a few doors from D, on 7th street;                                                                                                            Come one, come all, ladies and gents,                                                                                                            Get your likenesses for 25 cents.                                                                                                                         In case, complete, at Mrs. Phipp’s Ambrotype                                                                                               Gallery, No. 515 7th, between D & E streets.

Mrs. M. E. Phipps is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Washington, D. C. in 1860 at 516 Seventh Street, West.

Paige & Beach

1848                Concert Hall, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

Paige & Beach (Blanchard P. Paige & Albert Beach) was first recorded in unpublished research A Directory of Nineteenth Century Photographers of Washington, D. C., by Paula Fleming & Laurie Baty.  Paige & Beach proprietors for Plumbe Gallery, Washington, D.C.

They next appeared in an advertisement and article.  The advertisement appeared in the  New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) on July 12, 1848 Henry Clay In His 71St Year.—Published this day, (June 6, 1848.) by E. Anthony, 205 Broadway, a beautiful steel mezzotint engraving of Henry Clay, drawn and engraved from several Daguerreotypes by H. H. Ritchie [Possibly Alexander Hay Ritchie]

This likeness was mainly taken from a fine Daguerreotype now in the possession of the subscriber, executed by Messrs. Paige & Beach, Washington.  The artists is also indebted to Daguerreotypes taken by Messrs. Root, Simons, and W. & F. Langenheim of Philadelphia, and M. B. Brady, M. M. Lawrence and the Plumbe Gallery of New York, to all of whom the subscriber takes this occasion to express his thanks for the liberality with which they placed their valuable pictures at his disposal.

In addition to its merits as an exquisite likeness, this picture stands unrivaled as a work of art.

The title prefixed to this advertisement will distinguish the engraving from any other likeness of Henry Clay published by the subscriber or others.

Price of Proofs on India paper, $1.                                                                                                                      Price of plain paper, 50 cents.                                                                                                                      Price of prints in enameled frames, from $1 upwards.                                                                            For sale by E. Anthony, 205 Broadway.

Daniel Webster.—Also a fine steel engraving of Daniel Webster by Ritchie, from an excellent Daguerreotype by Whipple, of the same size and style with the above.

To any Editor who will give the above advertisement, with this notice, a prominent insertion, a copy of Henry Clay will be forwarded on the receipt of the paper.

The article appeared in the American Telegraph (Washington, D. C.) on July 8, 1851.  A sad case.—about a week ago the records of the Criminal Court should that Albert Beach had been found guilty of obtaining money under false pretenses; and he was yesterday sentenced by Judge Crawford to the Penitentiary for eighteen months.

This man is, we suppose, about thirty-six years old.  He was educated to commercial business in the city of New York, where he afterward held a profitable and responsible position in one of the first establishments.  He subsequently followed the business of daguerreotyping in this city, with apparently very good success; and while so engaged, two or three years ago, married a most estimable and excellent young lady.  To the surprise of many, however, he suddenly sold out his interest in the daguerreotyping establishment, and threw himself out of business for a time; but after a little commenced an auction store, in which his career was brief, as many who had come to know him predicted.  His course was then rapidly downward, and instead of “swelling” at the hotels he turned to lounging at the groggeries; and instead of trying to effect “transactions” at wholesale stores, his aim was simply to “do” some poor fool out of a few dollars.  Caught in one of these tricks, he has at least been sentenced to the felon’s punishment….

The partnership of Paine & Beach is not recorded in published photographic directories.  Paine is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, but Albert Beach is not.

Dr. Lover

1856                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

Dr. Lover was recorded in an announcement on September 12, 1856 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C).  Photographs By Gas Light.—Dr. Lover, the well-known artisan, has devised an apparatus for taking photographs by gas light. The main feature being the introduction of a stream of oxygen into the flame of common coal gas which had been previously made to pass through cotton and naptha, with the view of surcharging it with carbon, so as to increase the brilliancy on the admission of the oxygen.

Dr. Lover is not recorded in other photographic directories.

E. N. Lewis

1858                12 Market Space, Washington, D. C.

E. N. Lewis was recorded in one advertisement that ran from August 7 to 11, 1858 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) Call At Scott’s Bookstore On Pa. avenue, between 14th and 16th streets, and get a dollar Book and a Daguerreotype for only one dollar….Daguerreotypes will be taken by that excellent artist E. N. Lewis, at Mrs. Redmond’s Gallery, No. 12 Market Space, and by R. C. Woodley, 312 E street.

E. N. Lewis is not recorded in other photographic directories. Mrs. A. C. Redmond is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry. R. C. Woodley is probably Knight C. Woodley, who is also recorded in Craig’s.

C. A. Johnston

1856                [8th Street and Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D. C.]

C. A. Johnston was recorded in two announcements. The first appeared on July 30, 1856 in the Daily American Organ (Washington, District of Columbia). Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of 8th street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred to the Committee on Police.

The second announcement appeared on July 31, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of eighth street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred.

C. A. Johnston does not appear in other photographic directories. There is a possibility that C. A. Johnston is Mr. Johnson a daguerrean in Richmond, Virginia with traveling daguerreotype wagons (entry posted on 9-4-19.) There is no indication that the petition was approved.

Mr. Johnson

1856-1857       Wagons on the Corner of 7th & Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia.

Mr. Johnson was recorded in seven announcements and six advertisements in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virgini).  The first announcement appeared on March 28, 1856.  Daguerreotype Wagons.—Two of Johnson’s Wagons, No. 7 and 10, are now in Richmond, corner of 7th and Broad streets, built with best lights.  Johnson himself, with twelve years’ experience, is operating in them.  Brilliant and highly finished likenesses for Fifty Cents and One Dollar—half the usual prices.  Go early to avoid the crowd.

The second announcement appeared on March 31, 1856.  Fathers!  Mothers!  Brothers!  Sisters!  Friends!—Go to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one of his fifty cents or dollar likenesses.

The third announcement appeared on April 1, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad sts., and get one or two to give to your friends.

The fourth announcement appeared on April 2, 1856.  A Word to the Wise, &c.—Two of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons are now corner of 7th and Broad streets.  The superior lights enable him to take good pictures in any kind of weather.  His work is of the best style; he has been many years at it.  Reduced prices, fifty cents and one dollar.

The fifth announcement appeared on April 3, 1856.  Why do you Dress so nicely to get Your Likeness?—Go just as you are to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get on of his Fifty Cent or Dollar pictures.  He will make your cloths look equal to the best.

The sixth announcement appeared on April 4, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The first announcement ran from April 5 to May 29, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The seventh announcement appeared on April 8, 1856.  Wanted.—Two Horses and a Driver for a little more than one hour a day, for which one dollar each day will be paid.  Apply to Mr. Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets.

The second advertisement ran from May 1 to June 4, 1856.  A Book For Nothing!  Instructions Gratis!—Go to the Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two of Johnson’s 50 cent or dollar pictures for your friends; and he will give you his Treatise on daguerreotyping and Photography, by which you may learn the various processes used in the art.  Remember his prices are low.  He does a large business can sell cheap.  Johnson with his assistants take a very large number of Daguerreotypes daily.  He can, therefore, sell you larger pictures for 50 Cents and One Dollar, than you can get elsewhere; they are in the best style.  He has been many years in the business.  Good pictures taken in any kind of weather, as the lights in the wagons are built for the purpose.  Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad streets.

The third advertisement ran from May 12 to 14, 1856.  Five Operators, with extra Apparatus, and another of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, will be engaged during the holidays, so that visitors will not be delayed.  Those desiring good and cheap pictures will do well to embrace this opportunity, as Johnson’s stay in this city is now very limited.  For the quality of the pictures, he refers to the twelve hundred ladies and gentlemen who have patronized him in Richmond.  Price Fifty Cents, One Dollar and upwards.   Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad Streets.

The fourth advertisement ran from June 17 to 19, 1856.   A Good Business Chance.—One of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons with apparatus complete, for-sale cheap.  It is now doing a good business.  And one of Johnson’s operators would remain with the purchaser for a time, if required, and could thoroughly instruct him in the art.  For terms, &c. enquire at the Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad Streets.

The fifth advertisement ran from June 11 to November 6, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The sixth Advertisement ran from December 13, 1856 to January 28, 1857.  Many Thousand Likenesses have been taken this year in Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad streets.  Go and get one of his 50 cents or dollar pictures, and you will be pleased with it.

Mr. Johnson does not appear in other photographic directories as being active in Richmond, Virginia.  Further research is needed on this daguerreotypist, he claims to have twelve years’ experience (ca. 1844) and has a number of traveling daguerreotype wagons.  So far these are the only announcements/advertisements found, or anyone by name Johnson with a daguerreian wagon(s). There are several Johnson’s who were active in the early 1840’s but to suggest them would be pure speculation.  A listing for C. A. Johnston (will be posted on 9-10-19) appears on July 30 & 31, 1856 were he is asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon in Washington, D. C. Its possible they are the same person based on the proximity to Richmond the dates of the announcements and spelling variant of his last name.