Tag Archives: Daguerreotypist

Locke

1847                First building west of the Congregational Church, Litchfield, Connecticut.

Locke of the partnership of Martin & Locke was recorded in one announcement and one advertisement, he was also mentioned in one advertisement, and one advertisement that singles that Locke left the partnership in the Litchfield, Enquirer (Litchfield, Connecticut). The first announcement appeared on June 3, 1847.  Daguerreotypes.—We cordially invite the attention of our readers to the advertisement of Messrs. Martin & Locke, Daguerreotypist, 1st door west of the Congregational Church.  All who desire to obtain elegant and correct miniatures of themselves or their friends, will do well to avail themselves of the opportunity now presented.  A far more exact likeness can now be obtained for $2, than could have been procured for $30 ten years ago.

The first advertisement ran from June 3 to 17, 1847.  Colored Photographic Likenesses.  Messrs. Martin & Locke Will remain in this place for a short time, and will execute Photographic Likenesses by the Daguerreotype process, in a superior stye, possessing all the Colors of Life and guaranteed to give satisfaction.

Having made themselves acquainted with all the latest improvements in the Art, they are prepared (with the use of a different and superior article of Chemicals and gilding, by which, the impression receives a perfectly clear and natural appearance, and is made permanent upon the plate,) to do work which shall compare with any done in the cities.  Our mode of operating being the same as that of the principal Galleries in New York and Boston, and entirely different from those who preceded us. 

They would say to those who have pictures taken by the old method which are either faded out, or unlifelike in color, &c., that they will take them in Exchange For New Ones, or find a new plate and put them up into the cases at reasonable prices.

Groups of from two to six taken with all the distinctness of a single picture.

Likenesses of children taken with much success.  Also, Likenesses taken from Family Portraits which look more natural and lifelike than the Painting.

Ladies and Gentlemen are solicited to call and examine specimens, and sit for their Likenesses, if they choose, by way of experiment.

Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather.  Rooms 1st building west of the Congregational Church.

The second advertisement is for Martin by himself that ran on June 17 & 24, 1847. Martin’s Premium Colored Daguerreotypes.  Rooms in the first building west of the congregational Church. 

The third advertisement mentioned Locke appeared on June 24, 1847.  Colored Photographic Likenesses.  Martin’s Formerly Messrs. Martin & Locke Will remain in this place for a short time, and will execute Photographic Likenesses by the Daguerreotype process, in a superior stye, possessing all the Colors of Life and guaranteed to give satisfaction.

Having made themselves acquainted with all the latest improvements in the Art, they are prepared (with the use of a different and superior article of Chemicals and gilding, by which, the impression receives a perfectly clear and natural appearance, and is made permanent upon the plate,) to do work which shall compare with any done in the cities.  Our mode of operating being the same as that of the principal Galleries in New York and Boston, and entirely different from those who preceded us. 

They would say to those who have pictures taken by the old method which are either faded out, or unlifelike in color, &c., that they will take them in Exchange For New Ones, or find a new plate and put them up into the cases at reasonable prices.

Groups of from two to six taken with all the distinctness of a single picture.

Likenesses of children taken with much success.  Also, Likenesses taken from Family Portraits which look more natural and lifelike than the Painting.

Ladies and Gentlemen are solicited to call and examine specimens, and sit for their Likenesses, if they choose, by way of experiment.

Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather.  Rooms 1st building west of the Congregational Church.

Locke (first name unknown) is not recorded in other photographic directories.

John Lewis

1851                142 Chatham, New York, New York[1]

1855                Chatham Street, New York, New York.

John Lewis was recorded in the 1851/1852 New York City Directory.  Daguerreotypes—142 Chatham—H-28 Eldridge.  Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was not listed in the 1852/1853 directory—Published by John Doggett; also not listed in the following directories 1853/1854—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1854/1855—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1855/1856—Published by John Fowler Trow; and the 1856/1857—Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was also recorded in one announcement that appeared on October 5, 1855 in the Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D. C.)  Distressing Occurrence—At New York, on Tuesday, Coroner Kidder was called to hold an inquest upon the body of the wife of Mr. John Lewis, who came to her death under the following circumstances:  Mr. Lewis her husband, had for some time been ill with fever , and occasionally delirious.  On Monday, during one of these spells, he became unmanageable, and persisted in jumping out of the window of his room, which was on  the third floor.  No one but his wife happened to be present at the time, his mother, who resides with them, being down stairs.  His wife, who was a small delicate woman, tried every means in her power to keep him quite, but he, becoming perfectly frantic, made tor the rear window.  She seized him and endeavored to draw him back, when he suddenly leaped through the sash and both man and woman were dashed upon the pavement below, a distance of about twenty-five feet.  Mrs. Lewis struck her head upon the door-step and was instantly killed.  Mr. Lewis was seriously injured, and now lies at the city hospital in a precarious condition.  He is a daguerreotypist, doing business in Chatham street.

John Lewis is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City from 1851 to 1853.


[1] 1851/1852 New York City Directory.

William Leisenring

185-1856         Over Kauffman & Whitmore’s Store, Mount Pleasant, Iowa.

William Leisenring was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on February 14, 1856 in the  Mount Pleasant Observer (Mount Pleasant, Iowa).  Cutting’s Ambrotypes!  Or Pictures In Glass, By William Leisenring, at his old stand on the 3d floor of Kauffman & Whitmore’s store on the west side of the public square.

Having bought the right of Henry county, he is prepared to take the beautiful and Never Changing pictures in glass which are rapidly taking the place of Daguerreotypes they are a positive picture, showing the person without reversing.  They are beautiful in tone, bold and clear in effect.  The Ambrotype is taken on the best plate glass; an indestructible cement is then put upon it and another glass of the same size pressed upon it.  The cement soon hardens, and the two glasses become in effect one, with the picture in the centre [as] though it were in solid glass.  Clear days are the best for children.  Instructions given in the Art either in Daguerreotype or Ambrotype, or both.

Mr. Leisenring will be found at [his] rooms from 8½ o’clock A. M. till 4 P. M.  Wm. Leisenring.  Dec. 27’55.

William Leisenring is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1859-1860 in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.  Also listed in Pioneer Photographers From The Mississippi To The Continental Divide A Biographical Dictionary, 1839-1865.

Leisenring & Eckman

1855                Rooms above Friling & Grant’s Store, Sunbury, Pennsylvania.

Leisenring & Eckman (J. P. Leisenring & J. K. Eckman) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from April 21 to July 7, 1855 in the Sunbury American (Sunbury, Pennsylvania).  Daguerreotypes.  J. P. Leisenring & J. K. Eckman of Danville, respectfully announce to the ladies and gentlemen of Sunbury and vicinity, that they have opened Daguerrean rooms above Friling & Grant’s Store, in Sunbury, where they are ready to accommodate those who may favor them with a call, with beautiful and life-like miniatures.

All who desire miniatures will do well to call early and secure their pictures, as we know not what  day may bring forth.

Then hasten to our rooms, all ye people,

Before you have reason to grieve;

The cost you will find but little,        

And to satisfaction we’ll give.

Leisenring & Eckman are not recorded in other photographic directories as being active as partners.  J. P. Leisenring is recorded in Danville in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 and in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  J. K. Eckman is not recorded.  Using modern roads the distance between Sunbury and Danville, Pennsylvania is 13.7 miles.  

George A. B. Lazell

1847                Address Unknown, Columbus, Ohio.

George A. B. Lazell was recorded in two announcements.  The first appeared on January 4, 1857 in the Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio).  Daguerreotype views of the Flood.  Geo. A. B. Lazell, Esq., of this city, has just shown us nine different daguerreotype views of the flood, taken at and near the Columbus bridge, and at different stages of the destruction of the waters.  They are now being exhibited in the State House, and are attracting much curiosity.  They are splendid views, indeed.

The second appeared on January 13, 1847 in The Daily Chronotype (Boston, Massachusetts

Lazell, Daguerreotypist of Columbus, took nine different views of the flood from Columbus bridge, at the different stages of the destruction by the waters.  The views are in the State House.—Cin. Morning Signal.

George A. B. Lazell is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Lang

1852                Address Unknown, Gardiner, Maine.

Mr. Lang was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on December 23, 1852 in the Eastern Times (Bath, Maine).  Fire In Gardiner.—Mr. Morrill, route agent on the Kennebec and Portland Railroad, informs us that early on Saturday morning, a fire broke out in Gardiner, in the store  (directly over the post office) occupied by Mr. Stone, and owned by Mr. Richards of the firm Richards & Hopkins.  The store and goods were badly damaged.  The post office was saved by great exertions, although every thing was removed from it.  Among these who were burned out, are Mr. Lang, daguerreotype artist; Mr. Brown, barber, and Dr. Whitmore.  Damage about $2000.

Mr. Mr. Lang, is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Gardiner, Maine.  It is possible that this is L. Lang who was active in Portland, Maine from 1849 to 1851.

Joseph S. Lamson

1846                State Street Chapel, (Old Court House), Augusta, Maine.

1847                Rooms over T. C. Noble’s Store, Augusta, Maine.

Joseph S. Lamson was recorded in five advertisements and four announcements.  The first advertisement ran from March 5 to April 2, 1846 in the Main Farmer (Augusta, Maine).  J. S. Lamson’s Daguerreotype and Miniature Rooms In State St. Chapel, Opposite Mansion House, Where he will remain for a short time, and take Daguerreotype Pictures in the most perfect style that the art can produce, at all times of the day—either single or in groups—plain or colored—without regard to the weather, by calling as above.

Mr. L. will take likenesses of sick people at their residences, if desired, by leaving their address at his rooms.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens.

 Price of Miniatures, including Case, from $2 to $5.00  Joseph S. Lamson.  Augusta.

The first announcement appeared on March 12, 1846 in the Maine Farmer.  Lamson’s Daguerreotype Rooms.—Those who wish to have an exact fac simile of themselves taken, or wish to examine the interesting process of taking Daguerreotype Miniatures, would do well to visit Mr. Lamson at his rooms in the old Court House, opposite the Mansion House, State Street.

Mr. Lamson is a young but skillful artist, and intends making a permanent stand among us.—Our friends will find specimens of this art at the rooms, and many old familiar faces can be seen there, looking as natural as life.

We commend Mr. L. to your patronage.—He will take you “solitary and alone,” or group you in with your family, or some other good company.

The second announcement appeared on March 14, 1846 in the Gospel Banner (Augusta, Maine). 

Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Our townsman, Mr. J. S. Lamson, has taken rooms in the State st. Chapel, for the purpose of supplying our people with Daguerreotype likenesses.  We have examined numerous specimens of his work, and think them the most perfect “counterfeit presentments” of the human “face divine” we have ever seen.  The rigid ghastliness that formerly characterized this kind of pictures is now entirely obviated by an improved process, and a most lifelike miniature is produced, marvelous (sp.) alike for its naturalness and faithfulness to the originals.

The second advertisement ran ten times between March 14 to August 22, 1846 in the Gospel Banner.  J. S. Lamson’s Daguerreotype and Miniature Rooms In State St. Chapel, Opposite Mansion House, Where he will remain for a short time, and take Daguerreotype Pictures in the most perfect style that the art can produce, at all times of the day—either single or in groups—plain or colored—without regard to the weather, by calling as above.

Mr. L. will take likenesses of sick people at their residences, if desired, by leaving their addresses at his rooms.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens.

Prices of miniatures, including cases, from $2 to $5.  Augusta, March 4, 1846.

The third announcement appeared on April 25, 1846 in the Gospel Banner.  Daguerreotyping.  Mr. J. S. Lamson of this town is now on a flying professional visit to Waterville.  We commend him to the notice of our friends there as the best and most successful Daguerreotypist we have ever known.

The third advertisement was recorded on May 28, 1846. In the Kennebec Journal (Augusta, Maine).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber has taken Rooms (in State Street Chapel, opposite the Mansion House,) formerly occupied by Mr. Cannon, and is prepared to take Daguerreotype Miniatures in the most perfect style that the Art can produce, at all times of the day—either single or in groups—plain or colored—without regard to the weather.  He will take likenesses of sick people at their residences, if desired.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens.

Price of Miniatures, including Case, from $2 to $5.00  Joseph S. Lamson.  Augusta, March 5, 1846.

The fourth announcement appeared on July 16, 1846 in the Maine Farmer.  On His Legs Again. Our friend and townsman, J. S. Lamson, we are happy to state, is on his legs again.—i. e. so far recovered from his late illness as to be able to resume operations at his Daguerreotype Rooms, in the basement story of the Baptist Church, opposite the Mansion House.  Mr. Lamson, as everybody knows in these parts, is a very successful artist.

The fourth advertisement ran from May 14 to July 30, 1847 in The Age. Daguerreotype–Removal. J. S. Lamson has removed to the room over the store of T. C. Noble.

The fifth advertisement ran from May 20 to July 8, 1847 in the Maine Farmer.  Daguerreotype—Removal.  J. S. Lamson has removed to the room over the store of T. C. Noble.

Joseph S. Lamson is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Lamartine & Sullivan

1852                Boat near the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.

1852                Boat at the Steamboat Landing, Gallipolis, Ohio.

1854                Boat at the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.

Lamartine & Sullivan were recorded in six announcements and one advertisement. The first announcement appeared on June 17, 1852 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  Daguerreotype Yacht.—Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan inform the public through our paper to-day where they can obtain daguerreotype likenesses of the very first quality for tone and finish.  We have examined their specimens, and have seldom seen them equaled.

The advertisement ran from June 17 to July 22, 1852 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  Daguerreotype Yacht!  Lamartine & Sullivan’s boat is now lying at Pomeroy, near the wharf boat, where they intend to remain a few days.  They solicit the patronage of the inhabitants.  Their instruments are of the best kind.  The arrangement for light is so adapted that they can take pictures in all kinds of weather.  Those who are desirous of having good Miniatures, can now have an opportunity of getting the best kind.  Family groups taken.  Infants can be taken in a few seconds.  Specimens can be seen at the Post Office and on the boat.

The second announcement appeared on August 19, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal (Gallipolis, Ohio).  Daguerreotyping.  Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan would respectfully announce to the Ladies and Gentlemen of the place and vicinity that their Yacht is now lying at the steamboat landing prepared to do all kinds of Daguerreotyping, from the smallest size fine rings up to the largest size fine frame and cases.  Family groups of any number neatly taken and put up in good style.  Please give us a call soon, our stay will be very short.  Pictures taken in all kinds of weather.                                     

The third announcement appeared on August 26, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal.  Call at the yacht and have your likeness taken.  Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan are taking the best and cheapest likenesses ever taken in this place.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 2, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal. Daguerreotypes.—Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan, with their Yacht, designed remaining at our landing one week longer, in order to give all a chance of procuring a good likeness.  They certainly do up the thing in approved style.  We advise all to improve this opportunity of “securing the shadow ere the substance fades.”

The fifth announcement appeared on September 9, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal.  The Daguerreotype Yacht will remain at the wharf a few days longer.  Our citizens have found out that Lamartine is some at the business and have so crowded him of late that he has been induced to remain longer than he had previously advertised for.  Don’t miss the chance.

The sixth announcement appeared on July 25, 1854 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  Daguerreotypes.—Those who wish to preserve likenesses of themselves or friends, do not lack opportunity.  Lamartine is at our landing with his Yacht.  Handbills on the corners announce the fact that a couple of Itinerants have taken rooms over Branch’s store, and we are assured, by letter, that Messrs. Moore & Gilbert will be here next week with their Daguerrean Yacht.

Of the relative merits of the two first named we cannot speak—having never examined their work.  But if our friends are in no hurry, we can promise them something rich when Moore & Gilbert arrive.  During our recent absence, we visited them, and more recently they have sent us some specimens of their work, which may be seen by calling at our office.  We pronounce them good.  We think, therefore, our friends will lose nothing by waiting a few days.

Lamartine & Sullivan are recorded in Ohio Photographers 1839-1900 and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, both record them as being active in 1851 on the Muskingum River.  The Muskingum River is a tributary of the Ohio River approximately 111 Miles long. During the nineteenth century it was an important commercial route. Both Pomeroy and Gallipolis are on the Ohio River.

Towns on the Muskingum River include Zanesville; South Zanesville; Duncan Falls; Philo; Gaysport; Blue Rock; Malta; McConnelsville; Stockport; Beverly; Waterford; Coal Run; Lowell; Rainbow; Alden; Devola and Marietta.

Lake & Marsh

1855                Over Fresco Hall, Warren, Ohio.

Lake & Marsh were recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Western Reserve Chronicle (Waren, Ohio). The announcement appeared on June 27, 1855.–Messrs. Lake & Harsh (sic.), on the second floor of the same building, are taking good Daguerreotype pictures.

The advertisement ran from June 27 to Nov 7, 1855.  A Change.—Something New And Interesting To The Public—The old Rooms formerly occupied by H. W. Holloway together with the entire stock and interest of same, having been purchased by Lake & Marsh, experienced Daguerreotypists, they are now prepared to execute work in the best style of the art.

Having a large amount of Stock, and Cases of all kinds and sizes, they flatter themselves that they can give entire satisfaction to all who may favor them with their patronage.

No Pictures will be sold unless they are positively good ones.

Come old, come young, come great and small,

To the Daguerrean Rooms over “Fresco Hall.” 

Lake & Marsh are not recorded in other photographic directories as being in a partnership in Warren, Ohio.  While their first names are not recorded in the announcement and advertisement another ad ran from December 19, 1855 to March 26, 1856 that identifies Marsh as H. A. Marsh.

Speculation suggest that Lake is C. L. Lake who was first active in 1853 in Mason, Ohio and from 1853 to 1854 in Nelson, Ohio is about fourteen miles away from Warren, Ohio.  Both C. L. Lake and H. A. Marsh are recorded separately in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and in Ohio Photographers 1839-1900.

Albert D. Lacy

1855                Saginaw Street, Flint, Michigan.

Albert D. Lacy was recorded in one announcement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 2, 1855.  Fire at Flint, Michigan.  We have a telegraphic notice of the fire at Flint, Genesee county, Michigan, of Monday last.  The following particulars we take from the papers of that place:—

On  Monday evening, between 8 and 9 o’clock, our flourishing city was visited by the calamity of another of those awful fires whose ravages made a clean sweep from the corner of J. B. Walker & Co., on Saginaw street, to that of Dr. Moon, notwithstanding the almost super-human efforts to stay its progress.  It is impossible to state yet, with accuracy, the precise loss  of the sufferers, but below will be found as near an estimate as we have yet been able to arrive at after careful inquiry.  Fortunately there was time afforded, in the majority of cases, to remove the goods from the stores before the fire reached them.  It originated in the daguerrean rooms of Mr. Lacy, but in what manner is not known, as the rooms were locked at the time….

A. D. Lacy, daguerrean and dentist’s office–$300, No Insurance…

D. S. Frary, daguerrean rooms—$200.  No insurance.  

Albert D. Lacy is recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list him in 1855 without a business address.  David V. Tinder’s online Directory of Early Michigan Photographers also list him in Saginaw, Michigan as an ambrotypist in 1862-1863 and a photographer in 1853-1865.  David also reports that at various times in his career he was a dentist, a jeweler, a watchmaker and saloon keeper.