Tag Archives: Daguerreotypist

Parker

1847                Elliot’s Buildings, Keene, New Hampshire.

Parker (first name unknown) was recorded in one announcement that appeared on April 29, 1847 in the New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire).  Daguerreotypes.—Those who desire to have their likenesses transferred with “frightful accuracy” to a polished metallic plate, have ample room to choose.  There are at least three good Daguerreotypist now in town who have contracted with their principal agent, the Sun, for the right kind of light and just enough of it.  Messrs. Stone in Gerould’s block—Parker in Elliot’s buildings and Wilsons, a few doors north of the Cheshire House, are all ready to wait upon their customers, and will give them as good pictures as they will be able to get in the cities.

Those who wish a portrait by a very superior artist, should call upon Mr. Mason, portrait painter, at his rooms at the Cheshire House, where he will be happy to show some fine specimens of the art.

Parker is not recorded in other photographic directories. Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does record John O. Parker in Manchester New Hampshire in 1856, at this point in time its unknown if they are the same person.  

John M. Parker

1860.               Address Unknown, New York, New York.

John M. Parker was recorded in one article that appeared on May 25, 1860 in The New York Times (New York, New York).  Law Report.  General Sessions.  The Court of General Sessions, Judge Russell presiding, commenced to try cases yesterday, at 11 A. M., and did not adjourn till some minutes after 6 P. M.  Yet only three cases were tried, and but one disposed of. 

John M. Parker, alias King, was charged with the manufacture of counterfeit bills on the Exchange Bank of Hartford, Conn.  He was a young man of respectable appearance, and a daguerreotypist by profession.  The principal evidence against him, perhaps, was a large box in his apartment in Fifty-second-street, containing about twenty bottles of chemicals, such as are used in the photographing process; several sheets of paper, resembling that on which bank bills are printed, but of inferior quality; and a newspaper, on which test had been made of the color and force of the stamp, in red designed for the denomination of the bills.  The bills exhibited in Court were evidently photographs, and were not good specimens of the craft of the artist.

A Man named Thomas Newell was detected in Fifty-first-street, on March 29, attempting to pass some of these bills.  He was a co-mate of Parker’s, residing in the same house, and his arrest led to that of Parker.  He will probably be tried to-day.  The defence yesterday set up for Parker was, that he was a daguerreotypist and photographer by profession, and that in taking photographic impressions of these bills he was only practicing, just as a young artist would sketch anywhere and everywhere, to give him facility and skill.  The jury, however, took another view of his photographing propensities and found him guilty of the offence charged.  Where-upon Judge Russell thought that a residence of five years in the State Prison would be beneficial to him, and he goes there, and for that time, accordingly.

John M. Parker is not recorded in other photographic directories, he is also not listed in the New York City Directories.

G. B. Parker

1847-1848       Rooms over R. W. Farwell’s Store, Claremont, New Hampshire.

G. B. Parker was recorded in two advertisements in the National Eagle (Claremont, New Hampshire).  The first advertisement ran from October 29 to December 3, 1847.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  G. B. Parker, Daguerrian Artists; Rooms over R. W. Farwell’s Store.  Persons desirous of obtaining likenesses of themselves, family or friends, are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens.  Pictures taken singly or in groups with or without coloring, [regardless] of weather.

G. B. P. having availed himself of the many recent improvements in Chemicals and Apparatus, feels confident in saying his pictures can be surpassed by none.

Portraits, Paintings, Engravings and Daguerreotypes copied.

The second advertisement ran from December 31, 1847 to March23, 1848.  Daguerreotype Miniatures executed in a clear, strong, bold character at Parker’s Daguerreotype Rooms over R. W. Farwell’s Store.  Those desirous of obtaining an elegant and correct Daguerreotype are respectfully invited to call at my rooms and examine numerous specimens of my work, executed in this place.

Prices varying from $1.00 to 5.00.

A Perfect Likeness warranted in any weather.

Instruction given and Apparatus furnished on the most reasonable terms.

G. B. Parker is not recorded in other photographic directories.

John A. Palmer

1854                Over Alderson’s Bookstore, Lewisburg, Virginia.

John A. Palmer was recorded in one advertisement that ran four times from June 17 to August 5, 1854 in the Greenbrier Era (Lewisburg, Virginia).  Daguerreotypes!  John A. Palmer Daguerreotypist.  Is now in this place, where he will remain a short time, and offer his services to the public—most earnestly soliciting a share of their patronage.  Pictures taken at from $1 to [$30] or [$10], and entire satisfaction guarantied.

Rooms—over Alderson’s Bookstore.

Attention is called to the Stereoscopic or solid Daguerreotype—the Most Perfect of all pictures—which he takes in the best style the art.

Ladies and gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens.  June 17.

John A. Palmer is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Outley & Denison

1851-1852       Corner Washington Avenue and Third Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Outley & Denison (John J. Outley & A. C. Denison) appeared in one advertisement on July 5, 1852 in the Daily St. Louis Times (St. Louis, Missouri).  One Dollar!  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  At Outley & Denison’s Daguerrean Gallery, (formerly Wood & Outley) corner of Washington avenue and Third street, St. Louis.

Pictures taken at the above Gallery from $1 to [10], which we warrant to be equal to any taken in St. Louis.  We would respectfully invite the public generally to call and [see] specimens before having pictures taken at any other rooms, as we pledge [ourselves] to give entire satisfaction in all cases, or no pay.

Instructions given in the art for $25.  All kinds of Daguerreotype stock on hand and for sale low. Outley & Denison, Artists.  oct3.

Outley & Denison are recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry under Outley, John J. as Dennison (A. C.).  A more accurate date on the advertisement is October 3, probably 1851.  We also learn he was active prior to October 3 date in the partnership of Wood & Outley, this is possibly Gardner Wood based on entry dates in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Marcus Ormsbee

1842                62 Milk Street, Boston, Massachusetts.[1]

1843                75 Court Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

1843-1844       31 Middle Street, Over J. D. Kidder’s Store, Portland, Maine.

1845-1846       144 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

1847-1851       112 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

1848                Cataract Block, Saco, Maine

1849-1850       8½ Daniel Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

1851-1862       203 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.1

1855                777 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.1

Marcus Ormsbee, this is a partial record of his activity before the partnership Ormsbee & Silsbee in Portland, Maine and Boston, Massachusetts (see yesterday’s post for partnership records).  He was recorded in eleven advertisements (three of which he was mentioned in) and one announcement in four different newspapers.  The first advertisement appeared on January 2, 1844 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine).  Ormsbee’s Daguerreotype Rooms, For Colored Miniatures, No. 31 Middle Street….Portland.  The Proprietor, who was the operator and Teacher at the Daguerreotype Studio, No. 62 Milk St., Boston, where the art flourished and superseded all other establishments of the kind, (the first year) has, since that time, been employed in the same capacity, at the well-known establishment, “Plumbe” Daguerrian Gallery, No. 75 Court Street; and in fact, has been Teacher of this beautiful and most desirable art ever since the application of the process to taking miniatures.

In compliance with numerous and urgent invitations from the inhabitants of Portland and vicinity, he has opened Rooms, (as above) where can be examined specimens of his work, some of which are taken of public men well known to most persons, and he does not hesitate in saying, would be recognized from their miniatures as readily as they could be, were their faces reflected in a mirror.—He is as will be observed, (having been long time familiar with every department,) well qualified to instruct, or execute, in the very best manner, Miniatures taken from life, copies of Portraits, Bust, Pictures, &c. &c., and color them equal to the finest and most delicately finished painting, with every variety of color in the dress.

His prices being the same, with settings and case, as heretofore charged without—the advantage to his Glass House, so easy of access, (being but one flight of the stairs from the ground)—also affording a light that will admit of producing equal results in any weather—he hopes from these inducements to receive an early call from those who are wanting miniatures taken by his process, which he warrants to produce a copy that cannot be mistaken by the youngest acquaintance.  He will further say, that should the miniatures after being taken and put into cases, not suit, the persons are under no obligation to take them.

N. B.  Instructions in the art given, and every article appertaining to the business furnished, warranted of the best quality, and at the very lowest prices.

Terms.—A single Miniature, with setting and case, $3.  Cases and Lockets furnished, (of superior quality,) from $5 to $15.

All communications (post paid) will receive prompt attention.  Dec. 27.

The second advertisement ran on June 4 & October 29, 1844 and on February 18, & April 15, 1845 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  The Art At Last Perfected!  By recent improvements, Ormsbee has brought the Daguerreotype Art of taking Miniatures to a perfection heretofore unparalleled, and he can now warrant, in every instance, a Perfect Likeness, colored or plain, and as strongly brought out as the finest painting or engraving.  Satisfactory proofs of this fact, may be seen at his Rooms, over the Store of J. D. Kidder, Middle Street, in the Miniatures of many well-known citizens, taken by him.  In no case will a sitter be obliged to pay for a Miniature unless it is perfectly satisfactory.

The process is not wearing to the most debilitated invalids; and such applicants as are confined at home he will wait upon at their houses, either in or out of the city.

A Single Miniature with handsome case $3.—Gold, Plated, and Gilt Lockets furnished cheaper than can be had here, or elsewhere.

Apparatus, with his late combination Lenses furnished, and instructions given at the lowest prices.  Portland May 29, 1844.

The third advertisement ran on December 3 to 24, 1844 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Now.  Thanksgiving, Christmas and New-Year are approaching.  Those who wish to confer presents, on ‘Cousins,’ parents, brothers or sisters, could not select a more appropriate gift than a Beautiful Miniature, colored and correct to the minutest particular—such a one may be obtained for only $3, at Ormsbee’s Daguerreotype Rooms, (over J. D. Kidder’s ) Middle st.—Now Is The Time.  nov. 29.

The fourth advertisement appeared on April 15, 1845 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Yes! It is rumored that Ormsbee is about leaving Portland—but notwithstanding his numerous invitations to go to Boston, Philadelphia, Washington and elsewhere, he is yet to be found at his old stand, “One Gross,” (143) Middle street, where he is now exhibiting Daguerreotype Miniatures taken by his very late improvement, by which they are taken much larger, more distinct, and in about one-fourth the time—the process now being but from 9 to 15 seconds sitting.  He is able to obtain Miniatures of groups of children much younger then heretofore, and to the same degree of perfection as of adults.

A single Miniature, with handsome case, $3—Gold, Plated, and Gilt Lockets furnished cheaper than can be had in any other place.

N. B.  Persons wishing to acquire the Art can be furnished with Apparatus of his recent improvements and be warranted with satisfactory instructions, with a few days’ practice, in the new process.

All communications, post paid, will be immediately answered.

The fifth advertisement appeared on December 16, 1845 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser. 

Thanks.  Giving, Christmas, and New Year’s.  If those in want of Presents for either of those days, would just reflect for a moment, will readily perceive the Great advantage that a Daguerreotype Miniature has over any other selection that would cost twenty times the amount.  Portland, Dec 2. 1845.

The sixth advertisement (the first he was mentioned in ) appeared on October 6, 1846 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Commercial Academy.  Messrs. Keene & Drake Have opened a Room at 144 Middle Street, same entrance as to Ormsbee’s Daguerreotype Rooms, for the purpose of teaching Writing and Book Keeping…

The seventh advertisement ran on January 26 & February 2, 1847 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Of Course!!  Although some have thought that Ormsbee would “of course” raise his prices for Daguerreotypes, because his competitors have left the city—he is yet happy to inform them that this opinion is incorrect.  All have still and opportunity of obtaining the most perfect Miniature, set in a good Morocco Case, for the same low price as heretofore–$1.50.  No. 112 Middle, opposite the [bot.] of temple St.

Then let those who are desirous of making the most acceptable Christmas or New Year’s Present, call on the subscriber and obtain a miniature of unrivalled finish.  See a new and splendid case of miniatures at the door.  Ormsbee.  Portland, Dec. 22, 1846.

The first announcement appeared on January 18, 1848 in the Maine Democrat (Saco, Maine).

Likeness of Gov. Fairfield.—Mr. Omsby (Sic.) has, at his Daguerreotype Room, an excellent likeness of the late Hon. John Fairfield, taken just before he left home for the last time,  From this he has taken several copies for some of our townsmen, and can take any number more.  The copies are life-like.  There are also likenesses from the plate engraved for the Democratic Review, but the expression is not so natural.  Mr. John Dennett has taken some very good Daguerreotype copies of this engraving.

Mr. Omsby’s room is in the Cataract Block, where all who wish may see this remembrancer of our late friend—and get a copy of their own features if they choose.

The eighth advertisement ran from April 11 to June 13, 1848 in the Maine Democrat.  Drowning.  “Drowning Men,”  the old adage says “will catch at straws.”  This I believe to be the case with my neighbor, and I would say competitor, had he ever produced one miniature that would bear the least comparison with the most ordinary of even the subscriber’s pupils.  The gent, of course a scholar, being a preacher and doctor, has called the public attention by his advertisement, which I presume he thinks is somewhat peppered with wit.  The troubled man says to the public, not to be duped by persons boasting of their superiority.  In reply to this, I will say that the gent fired without effect, as the daily increase of my customers induce me to believe that his reference to two or three group specimens, which were taken when in practice as a pupil , will not change public opinion in any degree, as relates to his, the ‘Elder’s great Humbug.’  Truly wonderful discoveries!  Hillographic Drawings, not the old dark, rough Daguerreotype, as he is pleased to call it.  I will further state to the public, that I practice the Daguerreotype process, and keep pace with the improvements in the art, having been favored with business enough to keep my whole time employed.  I shall not be obliged to attend two or three other kinds of professions, therefore can give my customers the best miniatures the art affords.  Ormsbee.  Saco, April 3, 1848.

The ninth advertisement (second that he was mentioned in) ran from July 12 to September 14, 1848 in the Portsmouth Daily Advertiser (Portland, Maine). 144 F. M. Danielson Having taken a Room No. 144 Middle Street, wishing to solicit the favor of the citizens of Portland and vicinity, in sitting for their Daguerreotypes, having been in the employ of Ormsbee & Silsbee for the past, and Ormsbee the two years preceding years, feels confident that he can satisfy his patrons with a Daguerreotype Miniature, equal if not better than any one who professes the art, and at the very low price of $1.50 put into Velvet lined, and $1.25 in silk lined cases. May 9. 144 Middle Street.

The tenth advertisement ran from December 26, 1849 to July 18, 1850 in the New-Hampshire Gazette (Portsmouth, New Hampshire).  Daguerreotypes Executed by the aid of Sky-Light.  The subscriber having made some further improvements, also securing the assistance of Mr. F. M. Danielson, his operator for about four years, and the past year having obtained the premium for the best miniatures, feels assured in stating to the citizens of Portsmouth and vicinity, that they may obtain likenesses as much superior to any ever made by common process, as those would be when compared with pictures taken when in the infancy of the Daguerreotype art.  Ormsbee.  Rooms 8½ Daniel street.  dec. 18.

The eleventh advertisement (third that he was mentioned in ) ran from November 13 to 15, 1850 in the Portland Daily Advertiser (Portland, Maine).  Daguerreotype Notice.  The subscriber having disposed of his Stock and Stand to George M. Howe would respectfully recommend him to his friends and the public generally.  M. Ormsbee.

Notice Extra!  George M. Howe having purchased the Stock and taken the Stand of M. Ormsbee would inform the public that Daguerreotypes can be had at his place as well as at any other establishment in the city or country.  Having secured the services of Ormsbee’s best operators he cannot fail to satisfy his customers.

Miniatures taken in any kind of weather, from one dollar to ten and rendered satisfactory, or no charge, at No. 112 Middle street.

Marcus Ormsbee is known and appears in several photographic directories, histories and journals.  The first advertisement we learn that in 1843 he was working for John Plumbe, Jr. in Boston.  A closer look is needed with his activity during and after 1848.  According to Craig’s Daguerreian Registry the partnership (Ormsbee & Silsbee) ended in 1848.  That is verified in the announcement that appeared on January 18, 1848 in the Maine Democrat (Saco, Maine), and the following advertisement that ran from April 11 to June 13, 1848 in the Maine Democrat.   In the advertisement that ran from December 26, 1849 to July 18, 1850 in the New-Hampshire Gazette we learn that he is operating in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  That makes the advertisement that ran from June 1, 1858 to February 20, 1851 in the Christian Mirror (Portland, Maine). Question that assessment.  Daguerreotypes can be obtained at the rooms of Ormsbee & Silsbee, 112 Middle St. from the size fitting the Smallest Ring, Bracelet or Pin, to that of the plate measuring 55½ square inches.

Also—apparatus and stock of every kind appertaining to the business, furnished at prices Low as Can be purchased elsewhere.

N. B.  Instructions given in their Peculiar mode of operating.

Except for the eleventh advertisement above, where he sold the gallery and supplies to George M. Howe on November 13, 1850.  


[1] A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900.

Ormsbee & Silsbee

1847-1851       112 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

1851-1852       203 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.[1]

Ormsbee & Silsbee (Marcus Ormsbee & George M. Silsbee) were recorded in nine advertisements (one of which they were mentioned in) and ten announcements in six different newspapers, and one journal. The first advertisement appeared on july 6, 1847 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine). New. Not only a new association in business Ormsbee & Silsbee, but they are wishing to call attention to a few new specimens of Daguerreotype, which they have within the past ten days executed by a new process–one that is peculiar to themselves, and enables them to take Miniatures with equal certainty, in any weather, early or late, from 7 A. M. to 7 P. M. They are also prepared to take views of cities, villages, houses, to copy Portraits, Bust, &c., &c.–Daguerreotype Portrait Miniatures, equal, and in many instances better than the original.

They will, if desired, go to any part of the city or its vicinity, in case of sickness, old age, or deceased.

Stock.  Operators are supplied with Stock Cameras, (German and American) of different sizes, Plates, Cases, Chemicals, Gold and Gilt Lockets, of every description, delivered at their Rooms, at prices corresponding with Boston or elsewhere.

Instructions.  Instructions given with or without apparatus.  Rooms No. 112 Middle Street.

The first announcement appeared on July 29, 1847 in the Christian Mirror (Portland, Maine). Daguerreotypes.  While Daguerreotypists innumerable in this country are hanging out their signals to the patrons of the New and Instantaneous Art, it cannot be disguised that our citizens are favored with the presence of “Masters” indeed, in this, now, most popular of the arts.

The specimens on exhibition at the rooms of Messrs. Ormsbee & Silsbee, (112 Middle St.) are attracting crowds of visitors—and these gentlemen are deservedly reaping a remunerating harvest, we trust, for their labors.

As yet no miniatures, a la Daguerre, have been executed, in this city so nearly resembling the best pictures on Ivory, as those being scattered far and wide by the above named gentlemen.

No individual in New England, it is hardly probable, is so destitute of pecuniary means as to be unable to spare the money which a Daguerrian likeness costs.

We have often heard expressions of regret, by persons who were mourning departed friends, to the effect that they had neglected to possess themselves of a portrait or miniature of their lost one, while yet the lamp of life burned within him, or her, as the case might be.  The “New Art,” will hereafter preclude any soothing excuse, if we neglect to provide ourselves with transcripts of those whose image, when death shall have remove-them from our sight, would be precious.

We congratulate Messrs. O. & S. on the improvements which have resulted from their inventive efforts, and sincerely which them all the success, their talents, taste and industry so well merit.  Portland.

It is indeed a beautiful art; and who would avail themselves of it to procure images of loved ones, have the opportunity, and can choose between the several artists in the city, after inspecting their pictures.

The second advertisement ran from April 6 to June 1, 1848 in the Christian Mirror (Portland, Maine).  3000 Dollars Reward.  The subscribers propose to pay the foregoing sum to any Daguerreotype operators of this city, who will, with their present skill and process, execute a miniature that shall equal those taken with our process by pupils with only six hours’ practice.  Ormsbee & Silsbee, No. 112 Middle st.

The second announcement appeared on May 23, 1848 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  A correspondent of the Transcript, writing from Boston, speaks thus of the Daguerreotype Miniatures of Messrs. Ormsbee & Silsbee, of this city:—

In my walks around town I notice at every turn Daguerreotype specimens, but in none of them do I see anything like an approach to those by Ormsbee & Silsbee.  Theirs are by all odds the most life-like.  There is a distinctness and finish to their specimens which I took for in vain in others.  In their larger portraits which are quite equal to the finest engravings, as well as their miniatures, they certainly are entitled to the palm above all competitors.  There are some specimens in their rooms which all but speak their praise.

The third advertisement ran from June 1, 1858 to February 20, 1851 in the Christian Mirror. Daguerreotypes can be obtained at the rooms of Ormsbee & Silsbee, 112 Middle St. from the size fitting the Smallest Ring, Bracelet or Pin, to that of the plate measuring 55½ square inches.

Also—apparatus and stock of every kind appertaining to the business, furnished at prices Low as Can be purchased elsewhere.

N. B.  Instructions given in their Peculiar mode of operating.

The fourth advertisement (the one they were mentioned in) appeared on July 12, 1848 in the  Portland Daily Advertiser (Portland, Maine).  144.  F. M. Danielson Having taken a Room No. 144 Middle Street, wishing to solicit the favor of the citizens of Portland and vicinity, in sitting for their Daguerreotypes, he having been in the employ of Ormsbee & Silsbee for the past, and Ormsbee the two years preceding years, feels confident that he can satisfy his patrons with a Daguerreotype Miniature, equal if not better than any one who professes the art, and at the very low price of $1.50 put into Velvet lined, and $1.25 in silk lined cases.  May 9.  144 Middle Street.

The fifth advertisement was recorded from July 12 to September 26, 1848 in the Portland Daily Advertiser.  Daguerreotypes can be obtained at the rooms of Ormsbee & Silsbee, 112 Middle St. from the size fitting the Smallest Ring, Bracelet or Pin, to that of the plate measuring 55½ square inches.

Also—apparatus and stock of every kind appertaining to the business, furnished at prices Low as Can be purchased elsewhere.

N. B.  Instructions given in their Peculiar mode of operating.  June 1.

The sixth advertisement ran from July 15 to September 21, 1848 in the Portland Daily Advertiser. Daguerreotypes Can Be Obtained At The Rooms Of Ormsbee & Silsbee, 112 Middle Street, From the size fitting the smallest Ring, Bracelet or Pin, to the plate measuring 55½ square inches.

Also—Apparatus and Stock of every kind appertaining to the business, furnished at prices Low as Can be purchased elsewhere.

N. B.—Instructions given in their peculiar mode of operating.

The third announcement appeared on August 1, 1848 in the Portland Daily Advertiser.  Messrs. Ormsbee & Silsbee have recently been making some further improvements in Daguerreotyping and have just produced some very fine specimens of the art.  Progression is the rule by which these gentlemen are guided and they have been successful in it, having made since their commencement in business in this city some very important improvements, by which they are now enabled to execute as perfect a likeness and as highly finished a picture as can be produced by any other artist in the United States.  Such is the lifelike appearance of their work that it will speak for itself.  Their exhibition room presents several specimens, which they are always pleased to have examined.

The fourth announcement appeared on October 13, 1849 in the Portland Daily Advertiser.  The Cattle Show.  The Fair and Cattle Show of the Cumberland County Agricultural and Horticultural Society, held in this city on Wednesday and Thursday of last week, proved to be the most extensive and finest exhibition  the Institution has ever held.

Specimens of Daguerreotypes, by Ormsbee and Silsbee, were considered as demonstrating an arrival at the highest stages of the art.  Your committee do not hesitate to express their opinion that these cannot be surpassed by any Daguerreotypist in the country—Awarded a diploma.

Some Daguerreotype specimens, by S. L. Carlton, were  likewise thought excellent; but for want of sufficient variety a full comparison cou’d not be instituted between them and those above spoken of.

The fifth announcement appeared on October 16, 1849 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  The Cattle Show.  The Fair and Cattle Show of the Cumberland County Agricultural and Horticultural Society held in this city on Wednesday and Thursday of last week, proved to be the most extensive and finest exhibition the Institution has ever held….

Specimens of Daguerreotypes, by Ormsbee and Silsbee, were considered as demonstrating an arrival at the highest stages of the art.  Your committee do not hesitate to express their opinion that these cannot be surpassed by any Daguerreotypist in the country.

Some Daguerreotype specimens, by S. L. Carlton, were likewise thought excellent; but for want of sufficient variety a full comparison could not be instated between them and those above spoken of.

The sixth announcement appeared on October 29, 1859 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  (Official.)  Cumberland County Agricultural And Horticultural Society.  Agreeable to appointment the Fair and Cattle Show commenced on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 1850, in Portland.

The Cattle Show was held in the pasture, corner of Green and Portland Streets; the exhibition of Produce, Manufactured Articles, &c., at the City Hall…

Daguerreotypes—It may be proper too, to consider under this head the Daguerreotype pictures which are at the Fair, and are equal in beauty, accuracy, and perfection to those produced in any part of the world.  Though they are paintings by the sun and not by hand of man, which is only mechanically employed to a certain extent in their formation, yet as objects of ornament and not strictly of utility, and indebted for their beauty to the cunning of human skill, their station may be within the province of the Fine Arts.  Of the three different artists who have furnished these, Silsbee and Ormsbee produced their pictures by one method of operation, and Carleton by another; and as to their merit, [that] excellent judge, public opinion, has so decidedly established their equality, that any further distinction by this Society than a diploma to each, would seem invidious and improper.

The seventh advertisement ran from March 1 to December 15, 1851 in The Daguerreian Journal (New York, New York).  Listed in the Daguerreian Artist Register at 203 Washington St., Boston

The eighth advertisement ran from June 11 to 19, 1851 in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript  (Boston, Massachusetts).  203 Washington, Corner Of Bromfield St., Is the number were Ormsbee & Silsbee have opened the most extensive Daguerreotype Rooms in the World.

The subscribers have two Sky-light Rooms, one on the first flight.

They are to be assisted by two of the very best operators, consequently leaving our patrons positive of finding at all times two or more to wait on them, and with-out delay, which so often occurs with one light and one operator.

They also have a Private Reception Room, for Families, while waiting, one for the other.  The public are respectfully invited to call.  Ormsbee & Silsbee

The seventh announcement appeared on July 1, 1851 in The Daguerreian Journal.  Boston Daguerreotypists….Ormsbee & Silsbee had not opened their new, elegant and unique rooms, yet we were kindly invited through their establishment, which is well arranged and is a proud feature of the Daguerreian art in the city of Boston; we shall speak of this, as well as others, more at length in a future number.

The ninth advertisement appeared on August 2, 1851 in the Maine Cultivator and Hallowell Gazette (Hallowell, Maine).  203 Washington, Corner of Bromfield St., Is the number where Ormsbee & Silsbee have opened the most extensive Daguerreotype Rooms in the world.

The subscribers have two Sky-light Rooms, one on the First flight.

They are to be assisted by two of the very best operators, consequently leaving our patrons positive of finding at all times two or more to wait on them, and without delay, which so often occurs with one light and one operator.

They also have a private Reception Room for Families, while waiting, one for the other.

The public are respectfully invited to call.  Boston, June, 1851.  Ormsbee & Silsbee.

The eighth announcement appeared on September 1, 1851 in The Daguerreian Journal.  Olmsbee [sic.] & Silsbee, of Boston have hoisted their banner, and are now under full sail.  This is a new palace, fitted up this summer.

The nineth announcement appeared on September 30, 1851 in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript.  Splendid Daguerreotype Rooms.  Messrs. Ormsbee and Silsbee have recently fitted up at 203 Washington street, corner of Bromfield street, a suite of rooms, that for chasteness and richness, in furniture and pictorial embellishment, is unrivalled in this city; in fact, their entire premises constitute a gallery of art.  The walls are covered with some very fine paintings, and many superb engravings.  But the chief object of attraction is the unrivalled collection of Daguerreotypes, the work of their own hands.  These may be seen iv a great variety of styles, from plain and simple nature, to the most elaborate in tint and coloring.  Some are fair imitation of crayons, while others can hardly be distinguished from miniatures upon ivory, and will bear comparison with any ever taken in the country.

An hour can be spent most delightfully and profitably here on any pleasant day.  A most remarkable picture was taken yesterday by these talented artists, being the family of the late Thomas Gross, of Wellfleet, Cape Cod, consisting of ten sisters, whose united ages number 702 years; the eldest being 85 and the youngest 57.  There are two brothers living, whose ages swell the aggregate to 832.  They met yesterday at the house of Mr. John Bacon, in Alba Court, for the first time, Mrs. Bacon being the youngest sister.  They are of the old Puritan stock, truly a band of sisters, all members of the Methodist Church, to which they attached themselves at a very early period of their lives, and they continue to live steadfast in the faith of their fathers.  The parallel to this we believe cannot be found in the country.

The tenth announcement appeared on November 15, 1851 in The Carpet Bag (Boston, Massachusetts).  Ormsbee & Silsbee.—It is with pleasure we notice the daguerreotype establishment of these gentlemen, corner of Bromfield and Washington streets.  They certainly stand in the front rank of genuine artists; and after examining many of the dull, ordinary daguerreotypes displayed “around town,” it is truly refreshing to look at their brilliant and life-like pictures.  One good portrait is worth fifty poor ones.

Ormsbee & Silsbee are known and are listed in several photographic directories and histories but are included here for the new information in the Maine newspapers.


[1] A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900.

William Orcutt

1859                Address Unknown, Geneseo, Illinois

William Orcutt appeared in one announcement on October 19, 1859 in The Geneseo Republic  (Geneseo, Illinois).  Official Report of the Awards of the Henry County Agricultural Society for the Seventh Annual Fair…Thirteenth Department…

Best daguerreotypes William Orcutt, diploma.

William Orcutt Is recorded in A Directory of Early Illinois Photographers.  Compiled by Marie Czach list William Orcutt active in Cambridge, Illinois in 1864; and 1867.  Her information was from the 1864-1865 Illinois State Business Directory and the 1867-1868 Commercial Directory of the Western States and Rivers.

T. L. Nurse

1852-1856       Corner of Jefferson & Third Streets, Over W. H. Mauro’s Store Burlington, Iowa.

1856-1858       Corner of Jefferson & Third Streets, over Swan’s Store, Burlington, Iowa.

T. L. Nurse was recorded in six advertisements (plus one he was mentioned in) and five announcements in three different newspapers.  The first advertisement appeared on August 19, 1852 in the Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot (Burlington, Iowa).  T. L. Nurse, Daguerrean Artist, Has just received a new supply to his already extensive assortment of stock; and persons wishing Daguerreotypes, can always find at his room the latest style and best quality of cases, lockets, &c., with pictures to correspond.  Please call at the corner of Jefferson and Third streets, and examine for yourselves. 

N. B.  No pains spared to give entire satisfaction to every customer, and no charge if he don’t succeed.  Burlington, May 12, 1852.

The second advertisement was recorded from September 19, 1854 to May 16, 1855 in the   Hawk-Eye (Burlington, Iowa).  Daguerreotypes By T. L. Nurse, Of Chicago, Ill.  He has returned to Burlington with an entire new apparatus and a much better assortment of cases, than were ever before brought to this place, and has fitted up a very Pleasant Room Over W. H. Mauro’s store, (on the south side of Jefferson street, east of Main,) where he has a light second only to a sky-light, a far superior in every respect to the one used while here before.

All are respectfully invited to call and see for themselves.

N. B.—All Pictures warranted perfectly satisfactory or no charge.

Don’s forget the place, on the South side of Jefferson [a few] doors east of Main Street.  August 24, 1854.

The third advertisement ran from May 14, 1855 to February 27, 1856 in the Hawk-Eye. 

Daguerreotypes By T. L. Nurse, Over W. H. Mauro’s Store, (On the south side of Jefferson Street, east of Main.)  He has just returned from Chicago, with a complete assortment of Cases, of all styles, from the cheap $1.50 to the finest French, Also a fine assortment of Gold Lockets, f4om the small shells and Scallops, to those with four openings, which he will sell at lower prices than ever before offered in this city.

Please call and see for yourselves whether you wish pictures or not.

All Pictures warranted perfectly satisfactory or no charge.

Artists supplied with Instruments, Apparatus and tock, at reasonable rates.

The first announcement appeared on January 2, 1856 I the Hawk-Eye.  Beautiful Pictures.—We have examined some of the pictures taken by Mr. Nurse and find them very fine.  They are taken upon glass, are durable, can be seen in any light and altogether superior to the Daguerreotype.  See advertisement.

The fourth advertisement ran from January 2 to May 21, 1856 in the Hawk-Eye.  Glass Pictures, Or, Improved Ambrotypes, At Nurse’s Daguerrean Rooms, over W. H. Mauro’s Store.  These Pictures are a late improvement on the Patent Ambrotypes, being taken in the same manner, but put up differently.  Pictures by this process, instead of having the tone of the Patent pictures, are warm and life-like in tone, possessing a brilliancy never before obtained, and are pronounced by all impartial judges, to be far superior.  Please call and see fo4 yourselves, and remember the place to get Good Pictures, cheap, is a few doors east of Coolbaugh & Brooks’ Bank.  Satisfaction warranted in every instance, or no charge.  A large assortment of Plain and Fancy Cases, Gold Lockets, etc., constantly on hand.

P. S.  Don’s be humbugged into purchasing anything, just because it is patented, especially when you can get a superior article at a less price.  dec. 27.  T. L. Nurse, Artists.

The second announcement appeared on September 3,1856 in the Hawk-Eye.  Stereoscophic (sic.) Ambrotypes.—We were shown recently, by Mr. T. L. Nurse, a number of new style Ambrotypes, which it appears to us, were superior to anything we have met with, growing out of the wonderful discovery of Daguerre.  The principle distinction of the new improvement, is the seeming prominence of the figure, and the boldness of every line and shade.  They are worth attention from those who admire and appreciate every new feature of this graphic art, and all who desire a likeness of self or friend should give Mr. Nurse a call.  They will find his room worth a visit.

The fifth advertisement ran from September 10 to December 24, 1856 in the Hawk-Eye.  Something New!  T. L. Nurse would respectfully inform the public that he is ow taking a new and very superior Picture on Glass, called the Sphereoscopic Ambrotype.  They are pronounced by all to be as much superior to the Ambrotype, as the Ambrotype is to the Daguerreotype.  The objection of a Picture being too dark is entirely removed; for while they are lighter than the Ambrotype or Daguerreotype, they are at the same time more distinct than either.

Please call and see for yourselves.

He is still taking Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes and Photographs, either plain or colored in oil colors.

Ambrotypes set in Pins, Lockets, &c.

All work warranted satisfactory, or no charge.

The Spereoscopic Ambrotype is Patented, and can only be had at the rooms of T. L. Nurse, corner of Jefferson and Third streets.  Entrance to rooms on Third street.

The third announcement appeared on December 31, 1856 in the Hawk-Eye.  A Good Gift.—If “a thing of beauty is a joy forever,” as it probably is, just step into the Gallery of T. L. Nurse, and take a look at his beautiful Ambrotypes and Photographs, that need but the breath and spirit of life to move them to speak.  There is nothing more suitable as a present to your friends about the Holidays, than a likeness of yourselves, and nearly as acceptable.

The sixth advertisement (the one  that he was mentioned in) first appeared on December 9, 1857 in the Hawk-Eye.  Now is the time to get a Good Picture!  Ambrotypes, Photographs, Holotypes.  Prices To Suit The Times!!  H. N. Twining having taken the Rooms formerly occupied by T. L. Nurse, corner of Third and Jefferson street, will be happy to see all who are in want of a fine Picture, a real artistic gem.  Pictures [of] all styles with all the late improvements.  Particular attention is given to taking likenesses of small children.  From his long experience he is satisfied he can please all, even the most fastidious.  Call and see.  Remember, Thining’s Gallery is the only place in the West where you can get the Holotype or large views.—He has the mammoth instrument expressly for this purpose and the exclusive right of Des Moines County.—Prices to suit the times.  Perfect satisfaction given, or no charge.

The seventh advertisement was recorded from January 1 to February 14, 1858 in the Daily Iowa State Gazette (Burlington, Iowa).  Removal.—T. L. Nurse, Daguerreotype, Ambrotype And Photographic Artist, has removed his room to the corner of Jefferson and Third streets, over Swan’s store, where he has fitted up a fine suite of rooms and added many new improvements.

His operating room is furnished with the best sky light west of Chicago, ad provided with all the necessary apparatus for working any and all the branches of the Photographic art.  His reception room is open at all times to visitors who may wish to examine specimens or obtain pictures, and he extends a cordial invitation to All to call and judge for themselves if he has not the best rooms and the best light in the country; all will be treated with civility and politeness, whether they contemplate sitting for their pictures or not.

Ambrotypes made in the highest and best styles of the art, and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  All kinds of pictures copied with neatness and dispatch.  [may20’56.

The fourth announcement appeared on August 17, 1858 in the Hawk-Eye.  Died.  Yesterday afternoon, of consumption, Mr. T. L. Nurse.

The fifth announcement first appeared on August 24, 1858 in the  Hawk-Eye.  Administration Notice.  Estate of T. L. Nurse, Deceased.  The undersigned has this day been appointed by the County Court of Des Moines County, Iowa, Administrator of the estate of T. L. Nurse, deceased, late of this county.

All persons indebted to said estate are requested to make payment to the undersigned, and persons having claims against said estate, are herby notified to present the same to said Court for allowances.  J. M. Broadwell, Administrator. 

T. L. Nurse is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1856 in Burlington, Iowa.

Norton & Carden

1854                369 Broadway, New York, New York.

Norton & Carden were recorded in four advertisements, the first three advertisements are from The New York Herald (New York, New York), and one advertisement from The Photographic And Fine Art Journal (New York, New York), followed by three entries from the New York City Directories for 1853/1854; 1854/1855 and 1855/1856 1854.  The first advertisement appeared on June 5, 1854.

Stop! Stop! Stop!—It is the Fashion for all

To go to the daguerrean called International.

Kept by Norton & Carden, two artist of merit,

Who into your portraits throw nature and spirit.

So, quickly step into their gallery of art,

And they warrant a fine picture ere you depart.

Norton & Carden, 369 Broadway, next door to Taylor’s saloon.

The second on June 6, 1854.

Daguerreotypes—Daguerreotypes

Talk of your Browns, your Jenkins or others

Who take portraits of mothers, sisters or brothers,

A [  ?  ] is display’d which ne’er was thought on

In those which are taken by Carden and Norton;

They are all pronounced good, in fact they are fine,

So don’t forget its in Broadway, number three six nine.

The third on June 7, 1854.

Daguerreotypes-Daguerreotypes—“I Say, my friend, where are you going?”  “Why I am going as fast as I can to Norton & Carden’s international daguerrean gallery, to have my portrait taken; they are always good.”  “Are they?  Then I’ll go too.”  Norton & Carden, 369 Broadway, next to Taylor’s saloon.

The fourth advertisement appeared in The Photographic And Fine Art Journal on July 1854. 

Norton & Cardon—Have opened a Daguerrean Gallery at No. 369 Broadway…

1853.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1853-1854.

Carden, Robert A., daguerreotypes, 293 Broadway, h-[293] Broadway.

Carden & Co., daguerreotypes, 293 Broadway.

Norton, Elijah F.—not listed.

Norton, William H.—not listed.

1854.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1854-1855.

Carden, Robert A., daguerreotypes, 369 Broadway, residence not listed.

Norton & Carden, daguerreians, 369 Broadway.

Norton, Elijah F. not listed.

Norton, William H., actor, 369 Broadway, residence not listed.  

1855.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1855-1856.

Carden, Robert A.—not listed.

Norton, Elijah F.—not listed

Orton, William H.—not listed.

Norton & Carden is recorded in Craig’s Daguerrean Registry, but it is misleading the information provided is not consistent as to the identity of Norton, under Robert A. Carden Norton he is identified as W. H. and under Elijah F. Norton, John states that he is possibly the same Norton in the partnership.  W. H. Norton is not listed as being active in New York City, John does list a W. H. Norton in Boston in 1860.  In A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900 he is recorded in Boston as a piano maker in 1859 and a photographer in 1860 at 49 Tremont.