Tag Archives: Daguerreotypist

Thomas Waite

1857                Address Unknown, Pamelia, New York.

Thomas Waite was recorded in one announcement that appeared on October 1, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Jefferson County Agricultural Society.  Premiums Awarded…Pictures…

Best Specimens Daguerreotypes, Hart & Hose, Watertown, Dip. $1.00.

2d Best Specimens Daguerreotypes, Thos. Waite, Pamelia, book.

Best Specimens Photographs, Hart & Hose, Watertown, Dip. & $1.00.

2d Best Specimens Photographs, G. S. Rugg, Watertown, book.

Miss Alice Smith, Watertown, recommended, $3.00.

Hart & Hose, Watertown, recommended, $2.00

Those recommend a discretionary premium of $3.00 to No. 207 for best Ambrotypes, also one of $2.00 to No. 65 for 2d best Ambrotypes.

The committee would recommend that, at the next annual exhibition there be one premium for the best ambrotypes and one for the 2d best, and also a premium for the best ambrotype views.  A large portion of the pictures exhibited were of this character, and as they form a very interesting part of the exhibition the committee have recommended premiums to be given, and that greater inducement be offered by the society hereafter for the exhibition of specimens of art.  E. Q. Sewall, T. C. Chittenden, Jr., E. H. Smith, Judges.

Thomas Waite is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Von Sneidenburgh

1855                289 Broadway, New York, New York.

Von Sneidenburgh was recorded in one advertisement on May 3, 1855 in The New York Herald  (New York, New York).  New York Picture Company.—Daguerreotypes, 25 and 50 cents; photographs, $1 to $5.—A club of twenty artists employed taking 600 daily, by a principle of economy, system, and speed.  Professors O’Neil and Von Sneidenburgh, of Ireland and Germany, engaged by this company, 289 Broadway.

Von Sneidenburgh is not recorded in other photographic directories.  The 289 Broadway address is Silas A. Holmes gallery, he has been known to advertise that he employs twenty to twenty-five artist, and that he takes hundreds of images daily.

A. P. Vlasto

1856                423 Broadway, New York, New York.

A. P. Vlasto was recorded in one advertisement and one announcement.  The advertisement appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on March 30, 1856.  Vlasto’s Photograph, Ambrotype and Daguerreotype gallery, 423 Broadway, three doors above Canal street.—Pictures of the finest class taken in every style.  Prices moderate.  The public are respectfully invited to examine the specimens of superior photographs, &c.  A. P. Vlasto.

The announcement appeared on June 26, 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  An Artist Taking Poison.—Mr. A. P. Vlasto, a daguerreian artist doing business at No. 423 Broadway, was on Wednesday morning found lying on the floor of his gallery, insensible and quite stupid, as supposed from the effects of a dose of poison which, doubtless, he had purchased and taken the evening previous.  When the discovery was made, a physician was called in at once and applied the usual remedies in such cases, but there are scarcely any hopes of recovery.  The cause which induced Mr. Vlasto to take the poison was not ascertained; but if death ensues further particulars respecting the matter will be learned.  He it is said, had no pecuniary embarrassments.

A.P. Vlasto is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Vinal

1848                Address Unknown, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Mr. Vinal appeared in one announcement on March 23, 1848 in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript (Boston, Massachusetts).  Elopement.  A Mr. Vinal eloped last week, with a young female from Worcester.  He had only been in town a week, and was engaged as a daguerreotypist.  The parties went to Norwich.  Vinal sent back word to Worcester, for a bundle which he left behind.  This led to his discovery.  On opening the bundle a letter was found from his wife.  Officers went in pursuit of the parties, and they were brought back to Worcester, and Vinal has been put in jail.

Mr. Vinal is not recorded in other photographic directories; it is possible that this is G. Vinall who was active in Salem, Massachusetts with Samuel Masury in 1847.

M. Vedder

1844                Room at the corner of Union and Ferry Streets, Schenectady, New York.

M. Vedder was recorded in three advertisements in The Schenectady Cabinet, or, Freedom’s Sentinel (Schenectady, New York).  The first advertisement ran on June 4 & 11, 1844.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  M. Vedder, respectfully announces that he has fitted up the lower room at the corner of Union and Ferry-streets, which is much more convenient and pleasant for ladies to visit than the one he formerly occupied, where he is prepared to take Photographic Likenesses in the very best style, in fair or cloudy weather.

No person will be required to take a likeness that is not perfectly satisfactory.  Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and see his specimens.                                                                 

The second advertisement ran from June 18 to July 2, 1844. Daguerreotype Miniatures.  M. Vedder, respectfully announces that he has fitted up the lower room at the corner of Union and Ferry-streets, which is much more convenient and pleasant for ladies to visit than the one he formerly occupied, where he is prepared to take Photographic Likenesses in the very best style, in fair or cloudy weather.

No person will be required to take a likeness that is not perfectly satisfactory.  Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and see his specimens.                                                                 

Through Instructions given to those persons wishing to learn the art.

.The third advertisement ran from July 9 to September 3, 1844.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  M. Vedder, respectfully announces that he has fitted up the lower room at the corner of Union and Ferry-streets, which is much more convenient and pleasant for ladies to visit than the one he formerly occupied, where he is prepared to take Photographic Likenesses in the very best style, in fair or cloudy weather.

No person will be required to take a likeness that is not perfectly satisfactory.  Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and see his specimens.                                                                 

Through Instructions given to those persons wishing to learn the art. 

Only A Few Days Longer.  Those who are desirous of having likenesses taken by the subscriber, are respectfully informed that he will remain in this city but a short time longer. Room, corner of Union and Ferry.

M. Vedder is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Vaughn

1859                Address Unknown, West Point, Arkansas.

Vaughn of the partnership of (Maxwell & Vaughn) appeared in one announcement on February 4, 1859 in the Des Arc Citizen (Des Arc Arkansas).  Messrs. Maxwell & Vaughan, are prepared to take Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes, &c., at West Point.  From their experience, and high estimate placed upon their pictures, we have no doubt but they will be liberally patronized.  We have a specimen of their work, which can be seen at the Citizen Office.

Vaughn of the firm of Maxwell & Vaughan are recorded in Pioneer Photographers From The Mississippi To The Continental Divide A Biographical Dictionary, 1839-1865 as being active in Batesville, Arkansas on June 14, 1859.

Varney & Blair

1848                Rooms in Hayden’s Building, next door to the Bank, Woodstock, Vermont.

Varney & Blair were recorded in one advertisement that ran from June 1 to 8, 1848 in the Spirit of the Age (Woodstock, Vermont).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Messrs. Varney & Blair would inform their friends and the public, that they have established themselves in the pleasant Village of Woodstock, in Hayden’s Building, next door to the Bank where they are prepared to execute all kinds of Daguerreotype likenesses in the latest and most approved style.  Persons desirous of procuring Daguerreotype likeness of themselves or friends, or copies from portraits, Miniatures, paintings, Engravings or Statuary, are particularly invited to give us a call.  Instructions given in the art to take Likenesses in one fifth part of the time required by other operators.  Furnishing materials kept constantly on hand, All orders for stock will be promptly attended to, and sent, when money is enclosed, to any part of the country at our risk.  Varney & Blair.

Varney & Blair are not recorded in other photographic directories.

C. Vandenbergh

1849                Franklin House, Charlemont, Massachusetts.

C. Vandenbergh appeared in one announcement on November 1, 1849 in The Daily Chronotype (Boston, Massachusetts).  The Culmination of Art.—It may be questioned whether what has happened to painting by the invention of Daguerre, will ever befall the other branches of the fine arts.  The grinding from hand organs of the exquisite strains of Paganini, and the bewitching whig melody of “O Susannah, don’t you cry,” bears some analogy to photography, but still falls so short as to require at least a monkey to make weight.  The daguerreotyping of poetry seems a still more hopeless achievement, or at any rate, did seem so, till we became acquainted with the remarkable success of Messrs. Vandenbergh & Co., peripatetic Photographers to their majesties the million.  At our last advices they were in a fine old Massachusetts country town—somewhat retired from business—whence a friend sends us their poster.  From this truly photographic handbill we perceive that they have succeeded, with a success hardly known to themselves, in producing a perfect daguerreotype likeness of their own most poetical, not to say grammatical, conceptions.  We cannot withhold from our readers so great a triumph of art, particularly as it proves how, by a sort of mystic attraction, the kindred arts are all hastening to the same culminating point, indicated by the pioneer Daguerre.  The handbill thus commences in prose:

“The subscriber would respectfully inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of Charlemont that he has taken rooms at the Franklin House, where can be had or seen superior taken Daguerreotype Pictures, unrivalled for depth of tone and softness of light and shade, while they display all the artistic efforts of the painter, than you can wish to show.  These pictures are impressed upon a surface of silver, coated over with gold, showing the colors, dress, and jewelry, which renders them impossible to fade.  Satisfaction given, or no charge.

“Paintings and Views copied in a superior style, and with all the latest improvements.”

This serves admirably as foreground for the inmost poetical life of the great artist & Co., which is thus given photographically, verbatim et literati:

Science is advancing at a Telegraphic rate,

Since by they power oh mighty sun can sketch the

human face,

Tell me I pray, from whence thy magic art,

That from a single glance of thine such life-like start?

Here art triumphant our attention claims,

Here life seems speaking from the very frames,

Tradesman, Belles, Statesman, throngs our picture

walls,

Each form its living type recall,

Feature, color, altitude attire,

In beauty’s image all conspire.

Think not those pictures by the sunlight made,

Shade though they are will like a shadow fade,

No, when the lip of flesh in the dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread the eye,

Those pictures mocking at decay,

Will still be vivid as to day.

On silver bright the likeness is impressed,

And coated o’er with gold, the tint you see

On the ringlets rolled round the bright forehead,

In beauty’s bower, with smiles and joy surrounded.

If there is perfect joy on earth,

That seems from artist to have its birth,

It is to see the likeness of a friend,

The father, mother, brother and sister too.

Words have no power to tell the joy,

The source of intellectual light,

But thought unites and reasons right,

Drink deep and wings its flight.

But if we wait, and go, where mourners go,

Where the marble stone appears,

It looks like the city of the dead,

And gems shine but in memory.

C. Vandenbergh & Co.

C. Vandenbergh is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Massachusetts in 1849.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a C. Vandenberg who was active in Cynthiana, Kentucky in 1859-1860.  It is unknown if they are the same person.

P. H. Vance

1855                Rooms at the Athens Hotel, Athens, Tennessee.

P. H. Vance appeared in one announcement in The Athens Post (Athens, Tennessee) on June 29, 1855.  Daguerreotypes.—Gen. P. H. Vance, a daguerrean artist of some celebrity, is at the Athens Hotel, where he will remain for a few days.  He is very successful in his line, there being a freshness and truthfulness about his pictures attained by no other artist that has visited our town.  We commend his skill to all who may wish to be daguerreotyped.

General P. H. Vance is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. S. Van Valsor

1849                Rooms at S. S. Scudder’s Hotel, Huntington, New York.

J. S. Van Valsor was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York).  The first announcement appeared on July 27, 1849.  Daguerreotypes.—We refer our readers to the advertisement of Mr. Van Velsor, which will be found in another column.  It will be seen that he has taken Rooms at the hotel of Mr. Scudder, where he is prepared to receive his friends and the public, and furnish a likeness of the “human face divine,” in equal, if not superior style, to any other person who has visited our village for the same purpose.  We have examined some specimens, taken during his sojourn in our village, and are happy to state, that we discover in them a perfectness, which must insure to visitors, a likeness that will give satisfaction in every particular.  The recent improvement in the Daguerrean Art—by which the shade, which formerly partially obscured the relief of the features, is new thrown in the angle—renders a likeness thus procured, not only as beautiful as could be furnished by the brush, but of course, far more accurate.  There are many reasons why this gentleman should receive the patronage of the community, besides his skill as an artist.  We commend him to their kind attention.

The first advertisement ran from July 27 to August 3, 1849.  Daguerreotyping, At the Hotel of S. S. Scudder.  The subscriber would most respectfully announce that from the encouragement he has sustained, since he has been in the village, that it is his purpose to remain as above, for a short time longer where all who wish a good Likeness, by calling early, can be accommodated.

He wishes also to say, that from commanding advantages, viz:  A through Practical knowledge of the system and the use of the late highly improved compound of chemicals, & c., appertaining to the process, flatters himself prepared to furnish to the citizens of Huntington and its vicinity, with Daguerreotypes, in point of tone and development, not to excelled.  The public are aware that Likenesses often present an ill effect, by the features being excessively dark, and in many instances of a dead, blue cast, & c.  It is therefore apparent to all who examine my specimens, that this defect obviated. It is my theory to relieve the features, by a uniform blending of light and shade, rendering the Picture distinct and of a mild, life like tone.

N. B.—Dark dresses and Plaids effect the best drapery.

The best Pictures taken from 8 to 2 o’clock.  J. S. Van Velsor

The second advertisement ran from August 10 to October 12, 1849.  Daguerreotyping At Hotel of S. S. Scudder.  The subscriber would most respectfully announce that from the encouragement he has sustained, since he has been in the village, that it is his purpose to remain as above, for a short time longer where all who wish a good Likeness, by calling early, can be accommodated.

N. B.—Dark dresses and plaids effect the best drapery.

The best pictures taken from 8 to 2 o’clock.  J. S. Van Velsor.

The second announcement appeared on October 19, 1849.  Died in this village at the residence of Mr. Jesse Sammis, On Wednesday last, Mr. Jesse S. Van Velsor, aged 32 years.

Mr. Van Velsor has been engaged for the past few months in this village, at his profession, as a Daguerrean artist.  He had by his urbanity, and gentlemanly deportment, ingratiated himself with our citizens, and though comparatively a stranger received during his sickness, every attention which his situation and humanity could dictate.     

J. S. Van Valsor is not recorded in other photographic directories.