Tag Archives: New Orleans Louisiana

Dobyns & Hall

1853-1854       Address Unknown, Louisville, Kentucky.

Dobyns & Hall (Thomas Jefferson & Nicholas) were recorded in an advertisement that ran from August 17, 1853 to January 15, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Daguerran Stock And Picture Establishment.

Dobyns & Yearout, Nashville, Tennessee, College Street.                                                                        Dobyns & Hall, Louisville, Ky.                                                                                                                          Dobyns & Richardson, Morssewet, New York.                                                                                          Dobyns & Spaulding, St. Louis, Mo.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Yearout, Memphis, Tenn.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Harrington, New Orleans.

At any of the above establishments, you can procure as fine Pictures as can be had in any city, of any desired style or finish, as we have every improvement, and expect to keep up with any and all improvements.  We are prepared in either city to furnish artists with every article used in the art.  Our arrangements are such, we can furnish stock on the most reasonable terms.  Dobyns & Co.  N. B.—Pictures taken in any kind of Weather.

Dobyns and Hall are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Dobyns is the third photographer to have multiple franchises Followed by John Plumbe, Jr. and Jesse Harrison Whitehurst.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J. S. Clarke

N. D.                 Address Unknown, New York, New York.                                                                            N. D.                 Address Unknown, New Orleans, Louisiana.                                                            1847                Rooms in Mr. China’s Hotel, Sumterville, South Carolina.                                  1850                Address Unknown, Sumterville, South Carolina.                                                1850                Rooms in Mr. China’s Hotel, Sumterville, South Carolina.

J. S. Clarke was listed in an advertisement that ran from February 10 to 17, 1847 in The Sumter Banner (Sumterville, South Carolina). Color Daguerreotype Likenesses. The subscriber would respectfully inform the ladies and Gentlemen of Sumterville and vicinity, that he has taken rooms in Mr. China’s Hotel for a few days and will be happy to have all call and examine specimens whether they intend sitting or not.  After having experience in New York and New Orleans he does not hesitate to warrant his Likenesses equal to any taken in the Union.

No person will be required to take a picture after sitting if it does not give satisfaction.  Portraits copied correctly; Likenesses taken in clear, cloudy, or rainy weather.  Instructions in the Art given and apparatus furnished.  J. C. Clarke.

On February 27, 1850 Clarke was recorded in an announcement in The Sumter Banner (Sumterville, South Carolina).  Daguerreotypist.  Mr. J. S. Clarke is now in this place taking Daguerreotype Miniatures; and his presence affords an opportunity to those who are desirous of obtaining miniatures of themselves or friends of so doing.  Mr. Clarke’s miniatures, which we have seen him take, as well as those which he has on hand, are well executed.

Mr. Clarke has removed his rooms to Mr. China’s Hotel as his former location was found too damp for the purpose of his art.

J. S. Clark does not appear in any photographic directories.

Clark & Hedrick

1856                94 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana.[1]                                                        1856                Rooms at the Opelousas Varieties, Opelousas, Louisiana.

Clark & Hedrick were listed in an advertisement from September 6 to October 4, 1856 in The Opelousas Courier (Opelousas, Louisiana).  Ambrotypes.  New Style of Likenesses!  Daguerreotypes Superseded!!  Ambrotypes are far superior to the ordinary Daguerreotype for many reasons, viz:  They are finer and more beautiful; they do not reverse the position, as the Daguerreotype does; they can be seen in any light; they are taken in a much shorter time, therefore the expression is more lifelike.

They can be made double, so as to show two pictures instead of one.                                              They are sealed between two Glasses, and will never fade!                                                                  There is a softness and a brilliancy in this new style of picture which has never been obtained in the old Daguerreotype process.                                                                                    Persons wishing to see this new style of Picture are invited to call at the rooms of the undersigned at the Opelousas Varieties, where they will remain until the first of October.      Clark & Hedrick.  Opelousas, Sept., 6th, 1858.

The same advertisement appeared on September 6, 1856 in The Opelousas Patriot (Opelousas, Louisiana).

Clark & Hedrick (John H. Clark & F. S. Hedrick) are not new name but the partnership location in Opelousas, Louisiana is.

[1] Information from Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Richard Clague

N. D.                Address Unknown, New Orleans, Louisiana.                                                                        N. D.                Address Unknown, Paris France.                                                                                  1857                Address Unknown, Africa.

Richard Clague was recorded in an announcement on September 17, 1857 in the Green-Mountain Freeman (Montpelier, Vermont).  African Explorations… October last, under the auspices of Mahommed Said, the present enlightened Viceroy of Egypt.  The expedition was planned by M. I’Escatrac de Lauture, a Frenchman, who was joined by sis of his own countrymen, four Austrian gentlemen, one Prussia, an Englishman, and one American, all of them men of scientific professions, or attainment.  The American was Mr. Clagne, of New Orleans, a photographic artist.

Richard Clague is not recorded in any of the photographic directories I have referenced.  In fact every reference I have checked only refers to his landscape/portrait painting.  According to The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in America 1564-1860 Clague was an artist, teacher and landscape painter, who is recorded as being in New Orleans in 1851.  A search of the New Orleans newspapers might shed more light on Clague’s photographic career.

Robert A Carden

1855                Address Unknown, Alexandria, Virginia.                                                                          1853-1854     293 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                        1854                369 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]                                                                1855                Address Unknown, Alexandria, Virginia.                                                                  1856                Clay & Kearny Streets, San Francisco, California.[2]                                      1858                Address Unknown, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Based on work done by Peter Palmquist and Thomas Kailbourn in Pioneer Photographers of the Far West A Biographical Dictionary, 1840-1865, Craig’s Daguerreian Registry by John Craig, New York City Directories, and newspaper advertisements and notices in New York City and Washington, D. C.  I’ve put together the following snapshot of Carden’s activity.

Robert A. Carden was not listed in the 1852-1853 New York City Directory, he was listed in the 1853-1854 and 1854-1855 directories as daguerreotypes, 293 Broadway, in 1853-1854 directory his house was listed at 393 Broadway, Carden was not listed in subsequent NYC directories.  In 1853-1854 there was also a listing for Carden & Co, daguerreotypes, at the 293 Broadway.

Carden was recorded on April 13, 1853 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York.)  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.—Carden & Co., No. 293 Broadway, are still taking those superb Pictures at the low price of 25 cents, notwithstanding there are some who advertise 12 ½ cent one to be taken at a future day.  It is a well known fact that a picture cannot be produced for less than 25 cents; hence the great rush every day at Carden & Co.’s.

Craig’s Daguerreian Registry recorded the partnership of Carden & Norton, 369 Broadway from the 1854 Mercantile Directory.

He was recorded in the Daily American Organ (Washington, D. C.) on February 9, 1855 and in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) on February 10, 1855.  The Exhibition of the Metropolitan Mechanic’s Institute.—…Contributions from Virginia…Smith Bennett and Robert A. Carden, Frames of beautiful daguerreotypes;

Six months later the following advertisement appears on August 9 & 15, 1855 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Daguerrean Gallery For Sale in Alexandria, Va.  One of the best rooms in Alexandria.  Will be sold cheap for cash.  Any person who wants to learn the business will be taught; and also will teach the art of Photograph free.  That alone is worth one hundred dollars to any artist.  Two Artist wanted to color Photographs.  Address “RAC,” Artist, Alexandria, Va.

Pioneer Photographers of the Far West A Biographical Dictionary, 1840-1865, by Peter Palmquist and Thomas Kailbourn.  They mention that Carden is in San Francisco, California in 1856 working for Henry William Bradley at Clay & Kearny Streets.  Also that he wrote two articles for the Photographic and Fine Art Journal on April 1857, p 112 & 113 on Photography in California and was signed R. A. C. the same as the Evening Star advertisement on August 9 & 15, 1855.   In August of 1858 he wrote about the New Orleans Photographic Galleries on pages 244 & 245. Carden is reported in the same issue on page 256 that that he has returned to New York from New Orleans where he showed Ambrotypes and prints taken while he was there.  Was Carden active as a photographer or possibly as an assistant?  Further research is needed.  He was not listed in as being active in Photography in New Orleans The Early Years, 1840-1865, by Margaret Denton Smith and Mary Louise Tucker except to mention the article in The Photographic And Fine Art Journal.

Recorded on November 11, 1859 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York.)  Carden—At Little Falls, Herkimer County, N. Y., on Thursday, Sept. 15, Robert A. Carden, photographic artist, formerly of this city [died], aged 26.

[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Gallery in partnership of Carden & Norton.                                                   [2] Entry for 1856 & 1858 from Pioneer Photographers Of The Far West.

 

Henry William Bradley

1844- c.1846   Address Unknown, New Orleans, Louisiana.                                                                   1844                  Room in the corner house, opposite Judge Morgan residence, Baton-Rouge,                                 Louisiana.                                                                                                                            c.1846-1849    Address Unknown, Wilmington, North Carolina.                                                  1850-1878       San Francisco, California.                                                                                                1853-c. 1854   Sacramento, California.

Henry William Bradley was recorded in the Baton-Rouge Gazette (Baton-Rouge, Louisiana) on October 12 & 19, 1844.  Card.  H. W. Bradley, Daguerreotypist of New Orleans, respectfully informs the citizens of East and West Baton Rouge, that it is his intention to occupy a room in the corner house, opposite the residence of Judge Morgan for a short time, where he will be pleased to attend to those who may favor him with their patronage.  He is desirous that all should call and examine his specimens, which will speak for themselves; and guarantees to give a good picture, with or without coloring, or make no charge; which in all cases will be reasonable.  Pictures of any description accurately copied.

Bradley was not recorded in Photography in New Orleans The Early Years, 1840-1865 (Margaret Denton Smith and Mary Louise Tucker).  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry mentions that Henry W. Bradley learned the daguerreotype process in New Orleans, Louisiana but does not reference any dates.  John goes on to say that he arrived in California in 1849 and by August 1850 was operating a business. Also listed in Biographies of Western Photographers (Carl Mautz.) In Pioneer Photographers Of The Far West A Biographical Dictionary, 1840-1864 (Peter Palmquist and Thomas R. Kailbourn) List Henry William Bailey as being active in New Orleans, Louisiana c. 1846; Wilmington, North Carolina, c. 1846-1849; San Francisco, California 1850-1878; Sacramento, California 1853-c. 1854.

Based on the above information and checking all available photographic directories I am confident that the article below is for Henry William Bradley.  Recorded in the Southern Standard (Tarboro’, North Carolina) on January 31, 1852.  Agriculture In California.  Gold is not the only source of wealth in California.  But her soil is rich, and in many localities capable of immense production.  Agriculture appears to be attracting much attention, and has been very profitable during the past season.  We find in the San Francisco “Courier,” of the 14th November, a notice of an award of premiums for best agricultural specimens…and added to the exhibition are also beautiful specimens of the daguerrean and photographic art from Mr. Shew, and also from Mr. Bradley….

Tyler & Company

While this is an interesting group of photographers and needs further exploration, the following is what I know at this point. They advertised mostly as Tyler & Co. (with no first names.)  John Craig refers to them as “mass merchandisers” they come in to a town, stay a short period of time, undercut their competition, and flood the market with ninth plate images.  I have advertisements from several newspapers from both Boston and Worcester Massachusetts, but the bulk comes from the Richmond Daily Dispatch.  A new advertisement appears almost every day, starting on March 19, 1857 until late December when they advertise that they have opened another gallery at 39 Sycamore Street, Petersburg, Virginia.  Afterwards their advertising slows down a little, they miss a day or two here and there.  On January 30, 1858 they drop their price in half from .50 – $50 to .25 – $25.  During this time period a typical day’s advertisement is in a solid block with a paragraph or two and or between one and 13 separate lines of often repeating text.  On March 20, 1858 they claim that they have spent $4,000 over the past year on advertising.

They repeatedly make unsubstantiated claims. First that they were in New Orleans, Louisiana for eight years prior to being in Charleston, South Caroline for three.  In reviewing a number of photographic directories, I cannot at this time verify the New Orleans claim.  Looking at Photography in New Orleans, The Early Years, 1840-1866 by Margaret Denton Smith & Mary Louise Tucker they do not mention them. Craig’s Daguerreian Registry also does not list them in New Orleans, except to say that they won a wager that they could make 1,000 likenesses in four hours.  This was probably from an advertisement in one of the Charleston papers.  Looking at Partners with the Sun South Carolina Photographers 1840-1940, by Harvey S Teal.  He has Tyler & Co. in Charleston from December 1855 to June 1856 and again between, November 1856 to February 1857 that’s a total of 11 months, not the three years they claim.

Another claim is the amount of portraits they take daily which can fluctuate between 300 to 1,000 on any given day. They do advertise that they are taking daguerreotypes or what they call Vitrotype, later they advertise ambrotypes, photographs, lettertypes, ect.  They make the same claims “400 taken daily” when they were in Boston, Worcester and Charleston.  In Boston and Worcester they use a double lens camera.  In Richmond they advertise that they are taking “three at a pop.”  They also start out advertising that they employ fifteen artist which quickly becomes twenty and by the end of their time in Richmond they are up to twenty-five artists.

By the tone of their advertisement they are the only ones that ever uses steam in the production of likenesses, and that anyone who say they uses steam are just imitators. John Adams Whipple in Boston advertises on May 12, 1848 in the Salem Gazette that he is using a small steam engine to buff his plates. They also claim to have daguerreotype and ambrotype patents, and that they are inventors from everything I have looked at, no records of patents were ever issued to them.  They are also in the habit of claiming that they have at different time been issued 5 Gold medals, but they never say when or where they received these awards.  Every other photographer list when and where they received an award.  They did win a silver medal for Daguerreotypes at the 1857 Fair of the Virginia Mechanics Institute.  Also Albert Litch won a silver medal for color photographs, Sanxay & Chalmers won a silver medal for Ambrotypes, and E. Powers a first class diploma for Ambrotypes and Photographs.

Their philosophy which they state several time is to “keep it before the people.” Translation beat them over the head with their advertisements, and they do.  Their claim that other photographers are charging $2.50 for the same image they charge 50 cents for, is unjustified.  If fact other image makers were charging 50 cents for their images long before Tyler & Co. came to Richmond.

On May 18, 1858 we learn in an advertisement that C. R. Rees has returned to Richmond from a five month stay in Petersburg (Tyler & Co. new gallery.) On August 10, 1858 we learn that C. R. Rees is now the Proprietor.  Rees continues the same practice in his advertising as Tyler & Co. but with less regularity.  His excuses as to why he did not exhibit at the late fair was that he was getting ready to send specimens to his new gallery in Memphis, Tennessee.  It is interesting Tyler and Company have also opened a studio in Memphis around this time, what is the conection?

Craig speculates that the various listings he has for Tyler & Co. based on the language of the advertisements are the same company.  On June 6, 1857 the following advertisement appears in the Daily Dispatch which seems to verify John’s speculation.

Strangers and all others, are cautioned against being humbugged and deceived by steam pictures advertisements. This steam picture taker has been Driven out of Boston, Cincinnati, Worcester, Mass, and Charleston, S. C.  This Imposter commenced to advertise 50 cent Daguerreotypes but he found they did not take.  He then altered his show bills and advertisements to Vitrotypes for 50 cts., pretending it was a new kind of picture.  This fellow says he has taken 400 Pictures a day for 16 years.  Now he did not have money enough to buy a few yards of carpet when he arrived here, but had to run his face.  This same humbug man took pictures in Boston for 20 cts. apiece.  The public can judge whether his work is good or bad.  It is my intention to show him up just as long as he continues to humbug, lie and deceive the people of Richmond.                                                                       Respectfully, A. W. Osborne, Opposite Exchange Bank.

Below is the timeline and address of their studios to date.

 

N.D.               Address Unknown, New Orleans, Louisiana. [i]

1853-1855       2 Winter Street, Boston, Massachusetts. (Edward M. Tyler.) [ii]

1855                   Main & Front Streets, Worcester, Massachusetts.[iii]

1855-1856       233 King Street, Charleston, South Carolina. [iv]

1856-1857       233 King Street, Charleston, South Carolina. iv

1857                30 & 32 Fourth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio (James Tyler.) [v]

1857-1858       139 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia. i

1857-1858       39 Sycamore Street, Petersburg, Virginia. i

1858                Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. i

1859-1860       219 Main Street, Memphis, Tennessee (Edward M. Tyler.) v

1860                81 Westminster Street, Providence, Rhode Island. (E. M. Tyler.) v

 

 

 

 

 

[i] The Richmond Daily Dispatch

[ii] Directory of Massachusetts Photographers, 1839-1900 and the Boston Morning Journal.

[iii] Worcester Daily Spy

[iv] Partners with the Sun South Carolina Photographers 1840-1940.

[v] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry