Category Archives: Daguerrean Car

Noble & White

1851-1852       Daguerreian Car, on the Public Square, Jackson, Michigan.

Noble & White (first names unknown) were recorded in three announcements and one advertisement in the Jackson Citizen (Jackson, Michigan).  The first announcement appeared on December 24, 1851.  Daguerreotypes. We yesterday took a peep into the Daguerreian Car of Messrs. Noble & White, which is situated upon our public square, and was really surprised at the richness, brilliancy and beauty of their numerous specimens.  For correct delineation and life-like expression, their pictures are not surpassed by even any of the “premium daguerreotypes” of the eastern cities.  Let each go and take a look for themselves, and we doubt not that they will be impressed at once that these artists fully understand the art of being pleasant and agreeable, and also can in an unsurpassed manner.

“The giftie gin us,

To see ourselves as others see us.”

The advertisement ran from December 24 & 31, 1851.  The Ark Afloat!  That’s So, But Anchored!!  Noble & White, Daguerreian Artists Respectfully inform the citizens of Jackson that they are prepared at their Daguerreian Car, (on the Public Square,) to furnish all who desire a good likeness, with better pictures than are usually executed.  As they intend to remain but a couple of weeks, early application is advised.  Jackson, Dec. 23, 1851.

The second announcement appeared on December 31, 1851.  An Incident.—As we were, one day last week, sitting in the Daguerreian Car of Messrs. Noble & White, a lady from Dexter stepped in and asked, in anxious voice, if they had preserved a likeness of a little child, taken by them for specimen picture, while they were stopping in that village.  The father was urged to purchase the picture, but his rosy cheeked child was blooming with health and beauty, and he thought it a useless expenditure.  In two short weeks that promising flower was cut down by death; and his mourning parents sought, as a last  hope of preserving to their view, the features of their boy, the Daguerreian Car, in hopes that they might yet obtain the Daguerreotype.  But, alas, they were here disappointed.  The picture had been destroyed, and  their child was lost to them for ever.  Let those who desire a correct and beautiful daguerreotype of their family or friends remember that they should not wait for a “more convenient season,” as that may never come, but at once improve the present opportunity, as Messrs. Noble & White, remain but a few days more with us.

The third announcement appeared on January 28, 1852.  The People say that Noble & White are doing a “land office business,” taking Daguerreotypes.  The “Ark” is going away, one of these days; so all you Californians, lovers, husbands, parents, men women, children, boys and girls, who want a good picture, of yourselves, or any body else, now is your time.  “Delays are dangerous.”

Noble & White are not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Jackson, Michigan.  David Tinder’s online Directory oy Early Michigan Photographers records a Samuel B. Noble as being active in Grand Rapids in 1849-1850, also in 1850 as a dentist, Craig’s Daguerreian Registry also record S. B. Noble as being active in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1849.  It is unknown if they are the same person.

Mr. Moulton

1854                Car near the South Park, Pulaski, New York.

Mr. Moulton appeared in one announcement on September 14, 1854 in The Pulaski Democrat  (Pulaski, New York).  Daguerrean Car.—Mr. Moulton has located his Daguerrian Car near the South Park, strung out some good looking faces as signs, and ask the public to visit him.  We have done so.  The establishment has decidedly a “taking appearance—the specimens are equal to any we ever saw—and more of the same sort furnished to order.  Smith, so popular here three or four years ago, a fine artist and a capital fellow, is with him.  It cost nothing to look at their pictures and time spent viewing beautiful pictures is not lost.

Mr. Moulton is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Pulaski, New York in 1854.

Mr. Clark Moore

1849                Essex Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1851                Rooms in Mr. Cook’s Block, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1852-1853       Bank Building, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1853                Rooms over Mr. Hampton’s Jewelry Store, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1854                447 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Clark Moore was recorded in eight advertisements and eight announcements in the Cambridge Chronicle (Cambridge, Massachusetts).  The first advertisement ran from December 13 to 20, 1849.  For a short time only!  Bay State Daguerreotype Saloon on Wheels!

Mr. C. Moore respectfully informs the inhabitants of Cambridge that he has arrived with superior arrangements for the production of First Class Daguerreotype Likenesses, And has located himself on Essex street, Cambridgeport, near the City Hall.

This Saloon having been built expressly for the business and the arrangements are such that it is believed pictures can be produced which are not inferior to the best specimens of the art.  He has also secured, and is using the Patent Gilding Process by which a transparent coating is formed over the picture, preserving it in all its original brilliancy, unimpaired by age, and warranted never to fade by exposure to the light or air.

Pictures taken from Portraits, Daguerreotypes, Busts—also from deceased persons and invalids at their residences if requested.

The second advertisement ran from September 6, 1851 to November 22, 1851.  Sky-Light Daguerrean Gallery.  Mr. C. Moore, Would respectfully inform the inhabitants of the City of Cambridge and vicinity, that he has recently fitted up a Room in Mr. Cook’s Block, next door to the Bank, Cambridgeport, with a splendid Sky Light, by which he is now enabled to take Pictures in the short time of four seconds, and he is as usual, prepared to take Likenesses in a manner superior to any offered in this place, by a process entirely original.

He is enabled to obtain good Pictures in almost any kind of weather, in proof of which statements he invites the attention of all to his Gallery, to examine specimens.  Prices as low as can be found in any other city.

Portraits, Daguerreotypes, Bust, & c. & c., From deceased persons and invalids, at their residence if required.

The first announcement appeared on October 4, 1851. Those of our readers who wish to secure a good daguerreotype for themselves or friends would do well to call on Mr. C. Moore, whose office is next door to the Bank on Main Street, where specimens can be seen and where they can secure as good a portrait as at any other establishment.  Mr. M. is one of our own citizens and should be encouraged.  Read his advertisement.

The second announcement appeared on January 3, 1852.  Daguerreotypes.—Those of our citizens who wish for a good daguerreotype picture are referred to the advertisement of Mr. Clark Moore, in another column.  Mr. Moore in eminently successful in copying the “human face divine”.—Our citizens are invited to call at his rooms, over the Post Office, and examine specimens.

The third advertisement ran from January 3, 1852 to May 1, 1852.  C.  Moore’s Sky Light Daguerrian Gallery, Bank Building, Cambridgeport.

Good Portraits taken in almost any kind of weather.—Miniatures taken at 75 cents and upwards.

The third announcement appeared on March 27, 1852.  Mr. C. Moore, Grateful for past favors, would respectfully give notice that his Daguerrean Room will shortly close!   

All persons in want of Good Portraits of themselves or their friends, are respectfully invited to call. Delay no longer; life is uncertain; secure the shadow while the substance is here!  How often it is that we put it off while life fades, and is gone to be here no more!  When, for only a dollar or two a picture can be taken which will not fade, and will stand for any age.  Room in the Bank Building, Cambridgeport

The fourth announcement appeared on November 20, 1852.  Daguerreotypes.—There is nothing around which affection clings more fondly than the features of those we have loved who have gone from us.  To have these features vividly imprinted before us, as it were a living picture to which we may again and again recur, is a solace the value of which those only can know who have enjoyed it.  The process of M. Daguerre, which from him has taken the name of the daguerreotype, has conferred upon the world this blessing, and placed within the means of all the possibility of securing likenesses of friends while they live, to remain with us after they have departed.  The general advantages of this process are to well known to need repetition.  Some objections which are urged against it are more than over balanced by the advantages, besides that they are, for the most part, removed by a skilled operator.

Our citizens have enjoyed, and still enjoy, an excellent opportunity for securing good likenesses of themselves and friends, at the studio of Mr. Clark Moore, in the Bank Building, in Ward Two.  The experience of Mr. Moore eminently qualifies him to take good pictures, while the large number who have secured likenesses through his means, attest the success of his efforts.  His pictures are devoid of that stiffness of which complaint is sometimes made, and in point of finish and general execution they are equal to those by the most celebrated daguerreotypists.  The likenesses of many of our citizens, true to the life, may b e seen at his rooms.  Children of every age, group, and single likenesses are taken by him, and the most perfect satisfaction secured.  His rooms are admirably adapted for the purposes of light and shade

We write for the benefit of our fellow citizens.  Many neglect, while the opportunity is offered them, what at some subsequent period they most deeply regret.  Parents may now secure the features of their children, which in after years shall be objects of interest to both; children may secure those of their parents; friends may thus secure their presence with friends, though they themselves may be absent.  Should any be induced by what we have written to secure the pictures of those they love we doubt not they will subsequently remember our suggestions with gratitude.

We would recommend all who desire to secure daguerreotypes to call upon Mr. Moore; all that experience and the most assiduous attention can secure will be secured by him.  His prices are moderate, and, with his pictures, will not fail to give satisfaction.

The fourth advertisement ran from December 11 to December 18, 1852.  A Rare Chance.  Daguerreotype Establishment For Sale.  The Subscriber is about to leave the place and would like to dispose of his establishment, consisting of a full apparatus for the Daguerreotype Business.  The room is not inferior to any in Boston, having an excellent skylight.  This is a good chance for any one that would like to go into the business, a knowledge of which can be acquired in a short time.  C. Moore, Bank Building, Cambridgeport.

The fifth advertisement ran from June 4 to July 2, 1853.   Daguerreotype Rooms.  Removal.  The Subscriber has removed from his old stand on the corner of Main and Essex Street, to the commodious Rooms [517] Main street, over Hampton’s Jewelry Store, up only one flight of stairs.

He has been making important in his establishment, and is now prepared tom furnish Daguerreotypes of individuals or Groups, at all times, and at reasonable prices.

The public is invited to call at his rooms, and examine specimens.  C. Moore.

The fifth announcement appeared on June 25, 1853.  We had intended, several weeks since, to call the attention of our citizens to the removal of Mr. Moore’s Daguerreotype to the spacious chambers directly over Mr. Hampton’s Jewelry Store, and a few doors east of the bank on Main street.  His arrangements for taking likenesses, singly and in groups, are of the most perfect character; and his rooms, being up only one flight of stairs, will form an additional inducement with many to give him a call.  We hope he may be amply repaid for the great outlay he has made.

The sixth advertisement ran from June 4 to July, 2, 1853.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Removal.  The subscriber has removed from his old stand on the corner of Main and Essex Street.  To the commodious 417 [447] Main Street over Hampton’s Jewelry Store up only one flight of stairs.

He has been making important improvements in his establishment and is now prepared to furnish daguerreotypes of individuals or groups at all times and at reasonable rates.

The public is invited to call at his rooms and examine specimens.   C. Moore, Cambridgeport, June 2, 1853

The sixth announce appeared on June 23, 1853.  We had intended, several week since, to call the attention of our citizens to the removal of Mr. Moore’s Daguerreotype to the spacious chambers directory over Mr. Hampton’s Jewery Store, and a few doors east of the bank on Main Street.  His arrangements for taking likenesses singly and in groups, are the most perfect character; and his rooms, being up only one flight of stairs, will form an additional inducement with many to give him a call.  we hope he may be amply repaid for the great outlay he has made.

The seventh advertisement ran from December 10, 1853 to February 18, 1854.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Mr. C. Moore respectfully informs the inhabitants of this city that he still continues in his Room, opposite the Hourly Office, Cambridgeport, for the purpose of taking first-class Daguerreotype.  Mr. M. would also state that he has made many important improvements in the Art and is ready to give his entire attention to the business, and hopes to have his share of patronage.  He likewise takes Likenesses from Daguerreotypes, painted Portraits, Busts and Engravings; also from deceased persons at short notice.

The seventh announcement appeared on December 17, 1853.  Daguerreotypes.—Those of our friends who are desirous of having Daguerreotype likenesses taken of themselves or friends cannot do better than to call on Mr. C. Moore, at his rooms, opposite the Hourly Office, Main street.  Mr. M. is an experienced master of his art, and in our judgment is excelled by few of his profession.  For further particulars see advertisement in another part of our paper.

The eight advertisement ran from March 18, 1854 to April 8, 1854.  Daguerreotypes For 50 Cents!!  C. Moore is now prepared to take Daguerreotypes expeditiously by machinery, and an entirely new process, for the very low price of 50 cents!  Daguerrean Gallery, Main Street, opposite the Hourly Office, Cambridgeport.

The eighth announcement appeared on April 15, 1854.  Daguerreotype Views—Mr. C. Moore has recently taken very fine views of buildings and streets in the vicinity of his daguerreotype rooms, among which is one of the Chronicle building, owned by Mr. Joseph A. Holmes.  Mr. M. will be happy to exhibit these views at his rooms, Main Street, opposite the hourly office, and to contract for similar views with any of our citizens.

Clark Moore is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Cambridge, Massachusetts from 1852-1854.

Albert M. McKenney

1848                7 Batchelder’s Block, Factory Island, Saco, Maine.

1852-1855       86 Factory Island, Opposite the Post Office, Saco, Maine.

1853                Address Unknown, Biddeford, Maine.

1855                163 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

1856-1857       130 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

1858-1860       122 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.[1]

1861-1864       122 Middle Street, Portland, Maine

1864                284 Congress Street, Portland, Maine.

Albert M. McKenney was recorded in five announcements and sixteen advertisements in four different newspapers. He was in the partnership of Macomber & McKenney; S. T. & A. M. McKenney; McKenney & Scribner; and by himself.  The first announcement appeared on  October 31, 1848 in the Maine Democrat (Saco, Maine).  From the Union.  Show and Fair.  York County Agricultural Society.  We proceed to fulfil our promise made last week to give an extended account of the Show and Fair held here, Oct. 11th & 12th.  In order to get the proceedings into a reasonable space, it will be necessary to omit so much of the reports of the adjudging Committees as are merely formal, giving in such cases, the list of premiums awarded, only…

Miscellaneous Articles…Macomber & McKenney, Saco, specimens of daguerreotypes, $2.00

The second announcement appeared on October 31,1848 in the Maine Democrat.  From the Union.  Observations Taken At The Fair.  …Messrs. Macomber & McKenney of our place, presented some excellent daguerreotype likenesses, to which we are bound to pay our especial regards, our own likeness, a complete counterpart of ourself, having been elevated to the high dignity of being criticized and passed upon by a competent committee, with the view of awarding to the artist, if deserved, the tribute due to skill.  We are happy to see by the list that the lot, with the editors thrown in, obtained a gratuity of $1.50.

The first advertisement ran from May 11 to July 13, 1852 in the Maine Democrat.  Portable Daguerrian Saloon!!  Mr. A. M. McKenney, Respectfully announces to his friends and the public, in the vicinity of Saco, that he has arrived in this place with his Portable Daguerrian Saloon, And will remain a few weeks.  It is now on Factory Island, Saco.

He would say to them, he is an old and experienced hand at the business, and keeps up with the times by obtaining all of the Latest Improvements in the Art, and by the aid of his Splendid Saloon, which he has built at great expense, expressly for the business, with a large top light, he feels confident he can furnish those who favor him with a call, with as good or better miniatures that any other operator. 

Perfect and durable likenesses, with or without colors, single, or in groups from two to twenty.  Copies taken from other Daguerreotypes, Portraits, Engravings, Paintings, &c.  Sick Persons taken at their residences.  Particular attention paid to taking Corpses.

Plated and Gold Lockets from $1 to $15.  Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens.  Terms Reasonable. 

N. B.—I would correct an idea which is prevalent, that Miniatures cannot be taken as well in cloudy weather as clear.  I will take as good a Miniature when it rains or snows, as when perfectly clear.  Saco.

The second advertisement ran from February 8 to May 10, 1853in the Maine Democrat. Not Premium Daguerreotypes.  The subscriber, grateful for the liberal patronage bestowed upon him by the citizens of Saco, Biddeford and vicinity, and induced thereby to establish himself permanently in Saco, has the pleasure of informing them that he has purchased the rooms and fixtures of A. H. Beal, recently fitted up on Factory Island, Saco, opposite the Post Office.

The rooms are new, and with the best of Apparatus are inferior to none in the state.

He would say to the public that he commenced the Daguerreian business in its infancy, and has been in the business longer than any other Artist in the County, having made it his constant study for ten years, and devoted much of that time to experimenting in the Art.  He also has a chemical peculiar to himself, and superior to all others, he feels confident he can make a Better picture than any other Artist in this vicinity.

Not wishing, however, the public to rely on his word alone he would be pleased to have ladies and gentlemen visit his rooms and judge for themselves, as he has no intention of deceiving by offering to Wager five hundred dollars that he can take a better miniature than any other Artist.

I have been in Saco and Biddeford, operating in my saloon, about seven months, and in that time have made about 1,000 miniatures, and should have no fears in submitting them to the test of comparison with pictures made by other Artist, not excepting Premium Pictures.

My rooms will be open for visitors all hours of the day.  A Lady will be in attendance in the receiving room to wait upon ladies who favor us with a call.  One and all are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens and sit for pictures, perfect satisfaction guaranteed or no charge made.

I have a large and beautiful assortment of cases, frames, and lockets.  Miniatures taken in all styles, singly or in groups, and in all kinds of weather, equally as good in stormy as in pleasant weather, and at prices that cannot fail to suit.

All kinds of copying done at short notice and in the best manner.

Miniatures taken of sick persons and corpses, at their residences.

Particular Attention Paid To Taking Likenesses Of Children.  A. M. McKenney.

N. B.  I wish to have it distinctly understood by all that I am not connected with any other rooms in Saco or Biddeford.  Be sure to call at A. M. McKenney’s rooms, No. 86 Factory Island, Saco, if you wish a perfect likeness.

Copartnership Notice.  The subscribers have entered into a copartnership this day, under the firm name of S. T. & A. M. McKenney, for the purpose of carrying on the Daguerreotype business.  Their place of business is on Factory Island, Opposite the Post Office, Saco, where they will be happy to see all those in want of Portraits.  A. M. McKenney, S. T. McKenney.  Saco, Feb. 4, 1853.

The third advertisement ran from June 14 to October 25, 1853 in the Maine Democrat (Saco, Maine).  A New Whole Size German Camera.  The only one in the County of York.  Messrs. S. T. & A. M. McKenney would inform the citizens of Saco, Biddeford and vicinity, that they have recently purchased a Whole Size German Camera, for the purpose of making Large Miniatures & for Grouping.

It is double the capacity and more than twice the power of those we have been using.  We can now furnish our customers with as nice a miniature as can be obtained in Boston or elsewhere.  We have also made large addition to our Cases And Frames.  We have the most splendid assortment ever offered in this vicinity.  Please give us a call and examine for yourselves.

Don’t forget the place, S. T. & A. M. McKenney, No. 86, Factory Island, opposite the Post Office, Saco.

The fourth advertisement ran from October 25 to November 8, 1853 in the Maine Democrat. 

Dissolution Of Copartnership.  The Copartnership heretofore existing between S. T. & A. M. McKenney, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  S. T. McKenney, A. M. McKenney

The fifth advertisement ran from October 25, 1853 to April 4, 1854 in the Maine Democrat. 

Albert M. McKenney, One of the most experienced Artists in the State, will continue to make Good Daguerreotypes at the old stand, No. 86 Factory Island, Saco, Opposite the Post Office.

He returns his most sincere thanks for the liberal patronage bestowed on him by the citizens of Saco, Biddeford, and vicinity, and respectfully solicits a continuance of the same, feeling confident of his ability to take a better Miniature than any other Artist in York County, notwithstanding Bragging Circulars, Chlorine Gas, Advertisements, or Premium Pictures.

I have every facility for taking good Pictures, equal to any other Artist, and have recently obtained some very important improvements in the art, (which are unknown to other Artists in this vicinity.)  Likenesses executed in all styles, Singly, or in Groups, large or small.  Also, several entirely new styles, specimens of which can be seen by calling at my Rooms.  I respectfully invite all to call and examine them.  Perfect satisfaction guaranteed, or no charge made.  Pictures copied in an entirely new and superior manner.  A large assortment of Frames, Cases, and Lockets constantly on hand.  Pictures sold as cheap as at any other place in Saco or Biddeford.

N. B.  No. 86 Factory Island, is the only place “bearing the name of McKenney,” that I am concerned in. 

The sixth advertisement ran from February 3 to April 7, 1854 in The Union and Eastern Journal  (Biddeford, Maine).  Albert M. McKenney, One of the most experienced Artists in the State, will continue to make Good Daguerreotypes at the old stand, No. 86 Factory Island, Saco, opposite the P. O.  He returns his most sincere thanks for the liberal patronage bestowed on him by the citizens of Saco, Biddeford, and vicinity, and respectfully solicits a continuance of the same, feeling confident of his ability to take a Better Miniature than any other Artist in York County, not without standing Bragging Circulars, Chlorine Gas, Advertisements, or Premium Pictures.

I have every facility for taking good Pictures, equal to any other Artist and have recently obtained some very important improvements in the art, (which are unknown to other Artists in this vicinity.)  Likenesses executed in all styles, singly, or in groups, large or small.  Also, several entirely new styles, specimens of which can be seen by calling at my Rooms.  I respectfully invite all to call and examine them.  Perfect satisfaction guaranteed, or no charge made.  Pictures copied in an entirely new and superior manner.  A large assortment of Frames, Cases, and Lockets constantly on hand.  Pictures sold as cheap as at at any other place in Saco, or Biddeford.

N. B. No. 86 Factory Island, is the only place “bearing the name of McKenney,” That I am concerned in.

The third announcement appeared on April 7, 1854 in The Union and Eastern Journal.  Please notice the advertisement of A. M. McKenney, Daguerrean, Factory Island, Saco.  He has some very fine specimens of Stereoscopic Pictures, a new style, which are executed in the highest style of the art.

The seventh advertisement ran from April 7 to June 16, 1854 in The Union and Eastern Journal. 

Stereoscopic Pictures!—Made At—A. M. McKenney’s Daguerrian Rooms!! No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.

This style of Daguerreotype, which is entirely new and very beautiful, can be obtained at no other place in York County.  By this process, two pictures are taken at the same time, of the same person, and when finished, blend together as one, which is magnified to the size of life.

Every kind of Daguerreotype executed in a superior manner.  Copying done at short notice in any kind of weather.  A large assortment of cases, frames and lockets constantly on hand, for sale as cheap as by any other Artist in this vicinity.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine some fine specimens of the Stereoscopic Pictures.

The eighth advertisement ran from April 11 to August 22, 1854 in the Maine Democrat.  Stereoscopic Pictures!—Made At—A. M. McKenney’s Daguerreian Rooms!!  No. 86 Factory Island, Saco, This style of Daguerreotypes, which is entirely new and very beautiful, can be obtained at no other place in York County.  By this process, two pictures are taken at the same time, of the same person, and when finished, blend together as one, which is magnified to the size of life.

Every kind of Daguerreotype executed in a superior manner.  Copying done at short notice in any kind of weather.  A large assortment of cases, frames and lockets constantly on hand, for sale as cheap as by any other Artist in this vicinity.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine some fine specimens of the Stereoscopic Pictures.

The ninth advertisement ran from August 29 to December 26, 1854 in the Maine Democrat.  The Best Place—to get a—Daguerreotype Is At A. M. McKenney’s No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.

The tenth advertisement ran from January 2 to October 9, 1855 in the Maine Democrat.  (Saco, Maine.)  January 2, 1855, Vol. XXVI, No. 22, P. 3.

Latest News, From The Saco Daguerreian Gallery, No. 86 Factory Island.  A. M. McKenney makes better Miniatures than any other Artist in this vicinity, and at prices to suit all, from Fifty Cents up-wards.  He has better facilities for making them than any other Artist in this County, (although Brother Artists make false statements to mislead the Public.  All are invited to call, and he will show them a Patent Machine for polishing plates, equal to any in the United States.

Remember the place, No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.  Where will be found a largen assortment of Cases, Lockets; Pins &c., &c., Constantly On Hand.

The eleventh advertisement ran from January 10 to October 26, 1855 in The Union and Eastern Journal.  Latest News, From The Saco Daguerreian Gallery, No. 86 Factory Island.  A. M. McKenney makes better Miniatures than any other Artist in this vicinity, and at prices to suit all, from Fifty Cents up-wards.  He has better facilities for making them than any other Artist in this County, (although Brother Artists make false statements to mislead the Public.  All are invited to call, and he will show them a Patent Machine for polishing plates, equal to any in the United States.

Remember the place, No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.  Where will be found a largen assortment of Cases, Lockets; Pins &c., &c., Constantly On Hand.

The twelfth advertisement ran from August 28 & September 11, 1855 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine).  Ambrotypes, Pictures Taken On Glass. At R. Adams & Co., No. 163 Middle Street…Portland.  These Pictures differ essentially from the Daguerreotype, as they can be seen at any angle, are not reversed, will not corrode or change by time, are as permanent as the glass on which they are made, and will retain their brilliancy for ages.

Letters Patent have been obtained for the United States, Great Britain and France, by Mr. Cutting, the Inventor.

R. Adams & Co. have the exclusive right for making these Pictures in this city.  A. M. McKenney.  Rufus Adams.

The thirteenth advertisement ran from October 19 to November 16, 1855 in The Union and Eastern Journal.  Ambrotypes.  Pictures On Glass By A. M. McKenney & Co.  The Ambrotype is one of the greatest improvements achieved in modern photography since the first discovery by Daguerre.  The picture is taken on fine plate glass and united to a corresponding one by an indestructible cement thus securing it in solid glass, as permanent as the silix itself.  The picture is not reversed, has none of the dazzling reflection of the Daguerreotype, is bold and clear in effect and unsurpassed in beauty and finish.  The Ambrotype May be set in monuments, carried to sea or otherwise exposed to weather, in any climate, and will resist the action of the elements and its brilliancy for ages.  They can be seen in any light as well as engravings, and hence are very suitable for large pictures to be hung in frames.  Daguerreotypes can be copied in this permanent style and enlarged to any size.  The public are invited to call and examine specimens at our rooms.  No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.  A. M. McKenny.  A. H. Scribner.

The fourteenth advertisement ran from October 23 to November 13, 1855 in the Maine Democrat.  Ambrotypes.  Pictures On Glass By A. M. McKenney & Co.  The Ambrotype is one of the greatest improvements achieved in modern photography since the first discovery by Daguerre.  The picture is taken on fine plate glass and united to a corresponding one by an indestructible cement thus securing it in solid glass, as permanent as the silix itself.  The picture is not reversed, has none of the dazzling reflection of the Daguerreotype, is bold and clear in effect and unsurpassed in beauty and finish.  The Ambrotype May be set in monuments, carried to sea or otherwise exposed to weather, in any climate, and will resist the action of the elements and its brilliancy for ages.  They can be seen in any light as well as engravings, and hence are very suitable for large pictures to be hung in frames.  Daguerreotypes can be copied in this permanent style and enlarged to any size.  The public are invited to call and examine specimens at our rooms.  No. 86 Factory Island, Saco.  A. M. McKenny.  A. H. Scribner.

The fifteenth advertisement ran from September 30, 1856 to October 21, 1856 in the Christian Mirror (Portland, Maine).  Notice Photographic.  Having secured the services of that old campaigner in the Daguerreotype business, and oldest Ambrotypist in the State, A. M. McKenney, Esq., I am now able to give more of my personal attention to the production of first rate Photographs Pictures from Life, or Copies of Daguerreotypes, executed at short notice.  J. W. C. Morrison, 130 Middle Street.

The sixteen advertisement ran thirteen times between October 12, 1858 to January 25, 1859 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Photographs.  Wonderful Discovery!!  I am prepared to execute Photographs By An Entirely New Process, In A Style Never excelled in this Country.  When finished they resemble a Fine Steel Engraving, Though Far Superior!

Life Size Photographs, In Oil, Water Colors and India Ink.  Photographs of any desired size. 

Copies from old Daguerreotypes or Ambrotypes.

Particular attention paid to Ambrotyping, and all work warranted.

Notice the Sigh of the Big Picture f Daguerre!  122 Middle street, Come And Be Convinced.  A. M. McKenney. 

The fourth announcement appeared on March 8, 1859 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Photographs Of The Police.—We have seen at our Police Station some fine photographic likenesses by McKenny and by Burnham of the members of the police department of our city government.  Those by Barnham are taken on two sheets, sitting and standing in a group.  Those by McKenny are taken separately half-length.—They are admirably executed, and being glassed and framed, present an appropriate ornament to the room.  The arrangement of the photographs in the frame is very tasteful.  The Marshal occupies the centre position flanked by his deputies, while the members are arranged around in an elliptical (Sic. form.  By the way, a more efficient and gentlemanly set of men it would be hard to find than those constituting our police force.

The fifth announcement appeared on May 10, 1859 in the Portland Weekly Advertiser.  Court House.—As this old structure is about to be demolished, those who may wish to keep alive the association and memories connected with it, had better procure a photographic image of it.  An excellent one has just been taken by Mr. A. M. McKenney, and copies can be procured at his rooms, 122 Middle street.

Albert M. McKenney is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Saco, Maine in 1855 and in Portland, Maine from 1858-1860.  I have not included advertisements after 1860 because the research is incomplete.


[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

O. P. Howe

1854-1855       Car at the East end of the Bridge, Augusta, Maine.

1856-1858       Water Street, opposite the Stanley House, Augusta, Maine.

1959                Rooms opposite the foot of Oak Street, Augusta, Maine.

O. P. Howe was recorded in twelve advertisements and three announcements. The first advertisement appeared on December 14, 1854 in the Maine Farmer (Augusta, Maine).

East Side Daguerreotype Establishment.  Calotypes, Daguerreotypes, Crayons, and Stereoscope Likenesses are executed in the Highest Style of the Art at Howe’s Miniature House, East End Kennebec Bridge, Augusta.

The second advertisement ran from on December 21, 1854 to January 11, 1855 in the Maine Farmer.  East Side Daguerreotype Establishment.  Calotypes, Daguerreotypes, Crayons, and Stereoscope Likenesses are executed in the Highest Style of the Art at Howe’s Miniature House, East End Kennebec Bridge, Augusta. 

Mr. O. P. Howe has the pleasure of announcing to the ladies and gentlemen of Augusta and vicinity, that he has located his Mammoth Daguerreotype Establishment at the East end of the Bridge, where he will be happy to wait on all who will favor him with a call, and are in want if Fine Pictures, set in fine Gold Lockets, Pins, or Rings; Rosewood, Gilt, German and French Frames; Papier Mache, Shell, Pearl, Jenny Lind, Morocco, Velvet, Jewel, Octagon Jewel, Dutchess, Mourning, Cabinet, and all kinds of Silk Velvet Cases, at fair prices.

N. B. No cheap 50 cent pictures and cases sold at this establishment.  Every Picture will be executed so that it will be worth the price charged for it.  I have spared neither pains nor expense to make everything just what it should be to meet the wants of First Class Customers.  Come and see.  A share of the patronage is solicited.

To my friends and numerous patrons at Waterville, East, West and North Vassalboro’, China, South China, Branch Mills, Weeks’ Mills, South Windsor, Cooper’s Mills, Turner’s Corner, King’s Mills, Pittston, Alna, Woodbridge’s Corner, New Castle, Sheepscot Bridge, &c., &c., I would say that being now comfortably settled, in my new and enlarged Saloon—probably the largest in the world on wheels—with every facility for producing pictures in the highest style of the Art, I should be pleased to receive a continuance of the favors which have heretofore been so liberally bestowed upon me, and for which I must here take occasion to express my sincere thanks.  Should they visit Augusta this winter, they will find me ready to furnish pictures in my usual perfect manner, on silver or paper, from 8 A. M. till sunset, in any kind of weather.  I choose to let my pictures speak for themselves.  Satisfaction given or no charge.

The subscriber has been for a number of years successfully engaged in furnishing Melodeons and Seraphines.  He will continue to furnish the Best Instruments from the best manufacturers, at their Lowest Cash Prices.  Any one in want of Reed Instruments, Fine Gold Rings, Bosom Pins, Bosom Studs, Ear Drops, Motto Pins, Lockets, Locket Pins, Locket Seals and Rings, Ladies’ and Gent’s Chains, &c., &c., or any description of Sheet Music, can do as well in buying of him, as they can any where else, as his prices never exceed those of other dealers.

The latest Songs, Waltzes, Polkas, Schottisches, Variations, &c. for the Piano, always on hand.

Sheet Music sent by mail.  On receipt of one dollar, I will forward six twenty-five cent pieces, free of postage.  Orders attended to.  O. P. Howe.

The third advertisement was recorded  from January 19 to February 14, 1855 in the Kennebec Journal (Augusta, Maine).  To the Members of the Legislature, and Everybody else.  Poetry And Science.

Attention all hands!  I wish to suggest

To the people of Augusta, where they can do best;

My Miniature House is now wide awake,

And I am ready and Able good pictures to make:

I’ve every convenience to take young and old,

And make as fine as ever was sold.

I wish to remind you that this is the place.

Where, with a fine light, the features I trace,

And with the assistance—the light of the sky—

I never have fail’d to produce “a good eye.”

No “four cent” pictures at this Gallery are made,

Because we think such  things are sure to fade;

Neither will 50 ct. pictures here be sold,

For we Gild our plates with Chloride of Gold;

But for nine shillings, or dollar ‘nd a half,

I’ll put them in cases that are “bound in calf;”

With Gilt out-side—Silk Velvet within—

With a hook on each end as nice as a pin—

I can put them in Rings, in Pins, or in Lockets,

Or in funny little cases to carry in your pockets;

Or in neater ones still, on your table to lay,

Which are inlaid with pearl, and called “Papier Mache.”

Jenny Linds and the like, to numerous to mention,

But to dwell on these is not my intention.

I’ve all kinds of Cases, both single and double,

And Lockets of all sizes, which saves you all the trouble

Of looking any further than my Daguerreotype Car,

At the East end of the Bridge, which is not very far;  

Come in fair weather or foul, or come when you will,

I’ll give you a good Picture if you’ll only sit still.

And just in conclusion, I invite one and all,

Take “Time by the fore-top,” and give Howe a call;

For I’ve all things ready, plate bright as a dollar,

I’ll take you so “natural” you’ll almost holler.

N. B. Daguerreotypes taken on Silver or Paper, and satisfaction given or no charge.

Mr. H. is selling some very superior Melodeons and Seraphities at low prices.

Melodeons to let.  O. P. Howe.  Howe’s Miniature House, Jan, 15, 1855.

The fourth advertisement ran from June 7 to July 12, 1855 in the Maine Farmer.  (500 Pieces Sheet Music, Just Received, consisting of Songs, Ballads, Quartets, Polkas, &c. &c.  I will forward six 25 cent pieces, postage free, to anyone who will remit one dollar.  Send in your orders for any price you want, and I’ll be sure to have it.  Address O. P. Howe, Augusta, Me.

The sixth advertisement ran from July 26 to August October 4, 1855 in the Maine Farmer.  Melodeons and Seraphines.  For sale and to let by O. P. Howe.  Ware Rooms over Nason & Hamlen’s store, corner Bridge and Water Streets, Augusta, Me.

The seventh advertisement appeared on December 6, 1855 in the Maine Farmer.  Melodeons. Another Lot of those splendid Model Melodeons, made by S. D. & H. W. Smith, and Mason & Hamlin, Boston.  The subscriber begs to inform the people of Augusta, and the Musical public generally, that he has now on hand, and will keep as large an assortment of the above instruments as can be found in any Musical Establishment in Boston…

The eighth advertisement ran from February 7 to April 24, 1856.   Something New!  Ambrotypes and Mezzograph Pictures At Howe’s Miniature House, Water Street, Augusta.  Ambrotypes are taken upon fine plate glass, over which is placed a corresponding glass,—the two being cemented together, so that the picture is just as permanent as the glass on which it is taken.  They are far superior, in many respects, to the best Daguerreotypes.  They will not change or corrode by time, are soft and beautiful in tone, are not reversed in position, and, being taken on glass, are exceedingly brilliant, and are perfectly distinct in any angle.  Mezzographs are taken upon paper, and are equal to steel plate engravings.  They can be painted in Grecian or oil colors.  I am taking more of this kind than in any other style.  They are much admired.  The public are invited to examine specimens at my Gallery opposite the Stanley House.

Having the largest and most expensive apparatus ever brought into this city, and having the exclusive right for making the above pictures, I feel better prepared than ever to wait upon my friends, and respectfully solicit a continuance of the patronage which has been so liberally bestowed for the past year.  Daguerreotypes taken as usual.  O. P. Howe.

The ninth advertisement ran on February 19, 21 and March 2, 1855 in the Kennebec Journal. 

Melodeons!  Those Who Wish To Buy Or Hire Good Melodeons, will find it greatly to their advantage to call at Howe’s Miniature House, East End the Bridge, Augusta, Maine.

The tenth advertisement ran from February 21 to March 20, 1856 in the Maine Farmer.  Notice Particular.  I hereby certify, That I bought of Cutting & Bowdoin the exclusive right of Cutting’s Ambrotype Patent for the State of Maine, except the city of Portland, and that O. P. Howe of Augusta, has no right, whatever, under said patent, I having sold the exclusive right of the city of Augusta, to J. S. Hendee.  Asa Millit.

The first announcement appeared on March 13, 1856 in the Maine Farmer.  Daguerreotypes.  We would call the attention of our readers, and strangers from out of town, who have occasion to visit Augusta, and who may desire to patronize a daguerreotypist, to the establishment of Mr. O. P. Howe, opposite the Stanley House.

Mr. Howe’s daguerreotypes, and also his ambrotypes, are very fine specimens of his art.

We have also seen some photographs made by him, for a gentleman in connection with this office, which are certainly very finely executed.  Mr. Howe’s establishment is beautifully arranged for the comfort and convenience of his patrons, and we have no hesitation in saying that the treatment they will receive from the hands of this good-natured artist, will remove all sour looks from the countenance, and secure for the sitter a life-like, good-looking and pleasant picture.

The eleventh advertisement ran from March 20 to April 10, 1856 in the Maine Farmer.  To Artists.  Howe’s Dry Chemical, Acknowledged, by all Artists who have used it, to be the best, quickest, and safest Chemical in use.  Sent by mail at $1.00 per bottle.

Address O. P. Howe, Augusta, Maine.

The twelfth advertisement ran from October 15 to November 19, 1857 in the Maine Farmer.  Something New!  The Greatest Invention of the Age!  The March of Improvement is ever onward!  The Ambrotype supplanted the Daguerreotype, the Melainotype is now rapidly taking the place of both!  Melainotypes.  The subscriber begs to call the attention of all lovers of Pictures, and all in want of Permanent and Perfect Likenesses of themselves or friends, to a new style of Picture, called the Melainotype.  They are taken on a thin sheet of iron; are patented in the United States and England; they can be sent in letters without extra postage, can be handled without and glass over them; can be washed when soiled; they will bend without injury; are not affected by light, atmosphere, rain, or anything else.  In  short, they are the Cheapest, Prettiest, and Most Durable Picture Ever Yet Invented.  They Cannot Fade, but will last for all time.  Try one!  Try one!

Taken at “Howe’s Saloon,” opposite Stanley House, Augusta.  O. P. Howe.

The second announcement appeared on November 11, 1858 in the Maine Farmer.  At Work Again. Our neighbor O./P. Howe who has been confined by sickness for several months, has just re-opened his Daguerreotype Saloon, and is prepared to take portraits in the best style.  Ambrotype, photograph, and other styles of sun-painting done to order.  Give him a call.

The third announcement appeared on December 29, 1859 in the  Maine Farmer.  Ambrotypes And Photographs.  Our old acquaintance Howe, whose success and popularity as an artist formerly made his “institution” on Water Street the resort of all who wanted a good picture for themselves or friends, we are glad to see, after an interregnum of several months, has re-located himself in Augusta, at the rooms opposite the foot of Oak St.  He is prepared to supply any description of picture in the line of his profession in a style that will be satisfactory to all who may patronize him.  Call and examine his specimens.

O. P. Howe is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Augusta, Maine in 1856.  More research is needed it appears that Howe was running several businesses in Augusta at the same time and did not feel the need to advertise through the newspapers as often as some daguerreotypist/photographers…

Helia

1852                Address Unknown, Princeton, New Jersey.

Helia was record in one article in The Photographic Art Journal (New York, New York) and an advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The article appeared in Vol. III, No. 3, March 1852, P. 194.  A Daguerreotype artists, who is one of our subscribers, wishes to construct a traveling saloon, in such a manner that he may be folded within itself when not in use, Ie sufficiently light to be drawn by one horse, and yet large enough for all the purposes of his art, when unfolded and extended.  He desires us to request the publication of the views of such of our subscribers as feel disposed to favor him with their assistance.  His willing to remunerate the inventor of the most approved plan in a suitable manner.

—Since writing the above we have received the following letter from the gentleman alluded to.

Traveling Daguerreotype Wagon.  To The Editor of the Pho. Art-Journal.  Dear Sir,—Though the Photographic Art-Journal is devoted to improvements of general utility in the art, perhaps the present subject from its connection may be worthy of consideration to many Daguerreotypist.

I am and I have been for some time, as you are aware, traveling about with a large Daguerreotype saloon.  I find it inconvenient, expensive, and in some respects, ill-adapted to its purpose.  It is large, heavy and cumbersome, requiring four strong horses to move it.  I hire these horses from place to place, sometimes with more or less difficulty or expense. I have thought it practicable and desirable to build a Daguerreotype Saloon of such materials and dimensions that one strong horse could draw it over all tolerably good roads.  And I am now willing to do so.  But as in union there is strength, so I so I may be greatly benefitted and aided, if, instead of building upon my own plans I first obtain the collective wisdom of those who have already had experience, or thought upon the subject.

I therefore request from all those Daguerreotypist who may be willing to give the subject some little consideration, some plan or idea of how they would build the wagon I desire.  By their united assistance I could build one every way well adapted to its purpose.

To each individual who shall so favor me, I offer a drawing, lithographic or otherwise, fully explanatory of my wagon when completed.

It must be large enough when opened and stationary to operate in, with seats for customers, work-bench, dark-room, stove, sink, sky-light, &c. &c. It must of course be waterproof, and secured as much as possible from changes of temperature or gales of wind.

If it be asked what advantages I propose by such a wagon, I answer, that by keeping my own horse I can move about more independently and with greater activity than with a large one requiring four hired horses.  I can reap harvests at places too small to be visited by my present saloon.  These harvests are rich and rapidly gathered,—few or no reapers have visited their localities.

Any plan, or combination of plans, then that would offer most advantages and give a wagon that could be moved with one horse on common roads, while the publicity it increased the demand for Daguerreotypes in general, would be a desideratum to me and others who may wish to cary the art where it is yet but little known—Yours, Respectfully, Helia.

Gentlemen desirous of favoring me with their communications on the subject will please address, Helia, care of Mr. H. H. Snelling, 308 Broadway, New York.

The advertisement appeared on March 2, 1852.  To Daguerreotypist—Wanted, By A Travelling Artist, an operator of some experience.  He must be of good address, of steady habits, have respectable references, and be contented with a moderate salary.  Address with full particulars, stating age, experience, and salary required, to Helia, Princeton, N. J. Helia is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry with no activity dates or location.   John does reference the article in The Photographic Art Journal.

D. W. Grout

1854                Rooms opposite the Ingersoll Block, Pulaski, New York.

1857                Address Unknown, Pulaski, New York.

1859                Address Unknown, Pulaski, New York.                                                                                

D. W. Grout was recorded in Six advertisements and two announcements in The Pulaski Democrat (Pulaski, New York).  The first advertisement was recorded on July 28, 1853.  Plain and Fancy Harness, which he sells on better terms considering quality, than can be bought in the County, also Bridles, Halters, Trunks, Whips, Lashes, Harness and Carriage Trimmings, Saddlers Silk, and all other articles usually kept in this line of business.

Particular attention paid to repairing, cleaning and oiling harnesses.  Please call before purchasing.  D. W. Grout.  Shop next door to Angell& Seeley’s Store.

The first announcement appeared on January 12, 1854.  We learn that Mr. Tucker has bought the stock of Mr. Grout, harness maker, in this village, the latter retiring from the business.

The second advertisement ran from September 28 to December 28, 1854.  Daguerrean Rooms.  The Subscriber would return thanks to the public for the liberal patronage extended to him since engaging n the Daguerrean business in this place, and hopes for a continuance of the same.  He has just returned from below with a large and choice variety of Beautiful Frames. Morocco, Velvet, Union, Silver plated and Paper Mache Cases, and an Improved Large Sized Instrument which together with the facilities his rooms possess in light and apparatus will enable him to conduct the business to the satisfaction of all.

Pictures of all sizes taken and inserted in Lockets, Pins, Rings, Bracelets or any style of Cases.  Old pictures retaken at a slight expense. Likenesses of sick or deceased persons, taken at their residences if desired, at reasonable prices.

Ladies visiting rooms for a picture, if desiring dark drapery should wear black, red, maroon, yellow, Crimson, dark green or brown.  If desiring light drapery, they should wear white, blue, pink, light green or drab.  Good pictures warranted in all cases.

Rooms opposite the Ingersoll Block, Pulaski.  September 21st. 1854.  D. W. Grout.

The third advertisement ran from October 15 to November 19, 1857.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes & Daguerreotypes.  D. W. Grout, Having re-opened his Rooms and arranged things in taking order, will be found on hand at all times ready to wait on those wishing a first-class picture of themselves, family or friends, in any of the modern styles.

Children’s pictures taken in from 1 to 3 seconds between the hours of 10 A. M.to 2 P. M. only

Old pictures copied and improved.  Ambrotypes of residences or other out-door views made to order.  Always on hand a splendid assortment of cases and frames of every style.  Particular attention called to his gilt and plain frames for wall pictures. 

N. B.—20 per cent discount to parties or families of 5 or over.  Those desiring rich dark drapery should avoid in dress an excess of white, pink or light blue.

Rooms openfrom8 A. M.to 5 P.M. and pictures made at all times without regard to weather. 

Satisfaction given in all cases and charges reasonable.  D. W. Grout.

The fourth advertisement ran from January 6 to February 17, 1859.  “Not for a day, but for all time.”  Do you know you can get one of Gout’s superb double glass pictures for 4 shillings at the same price you pay for a worthless imitation?

Having just returned from New York with an assortment of cases comprising over one hundred different styles, sizes and patterns, varying in prices , with pictures, from four shilling to $5.

I would solicit a continuation of the patronage heretofore so liberally bestowed, feeling confident that I can suit the most fastidious, bout in pictures and settings. 

N.B.  Operators supplied with stock of all kinds.  D. W. Grout.  Pulaski, Oct. 14, 1858.

The fifth advertisement ran from January 6 to December 28, 1859.  D. W. Grout, Daguerrean Artists, Pulaski, N. Y.  Lockets, Cases, Frames, &c. of all styles, always on hand. Pictures unsurpassed.

The sixth advertisement ran from March 10 to December 29, 1859.  Pictures!  Pictures! The Subscriber has just received an addition to his stock, which comprises all the Latest Styles Of Cases, and everything pertaining to the Picture trade. By keeping posted in all the improvements in the art, I am enabled to give my patrons the benefit of any Real Improvements that may be made, having three different sizes of Quick Working Cameras.

Perfect Pictures in every known Style, Variety, and Size can be made on short notice, and with a beauty of tone and sharpness of outline unsurpassed.

N. B.  The subscriber does not propose to e undersold by anything in this vicinity.

Artists materials and stock of all kinds at New York prices.

For sale, a daguerrean Car—will be sold for half its value. D. W. Grout.

The second announcement appeared on April 28, 1859.  New Office.—We understand that Chas. H. Cross, Esq., will immediately commence the erection of a new brick office, on the present site of Grout’s Daguerrean Saloon, which will soon occupy the second story of the new structure.

D. W. Grout is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a D. W. Gront who was active in Pulaski and Richland, New York in 1859.  They are probably the same person.

James Flanders

1849                Poor’s Building, West corner of State and Pleasant Streets, Newburyport, Massachusetts.

1850               62 State Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts.[1]

1851                62 State Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts.[2]

1852                Maj. Shaw’s, Charter Street, Newburyport, Massachusetts.

James Flanders was recorded in three advertisements.  The first advertisement appeared on January 30, 1849 in the Newburyport Morning Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Notice.  Mr. James Flanders would respectfully inform the inhabitants of Newburyport and vicinity, that he has taken Rooms in N. Poor’s Building, West corner of State and Pleasant streets, entrance on State street, up stairs.  j18. 

The second advertisement appeared on May 25, 1849 in the Watchtower (Newburyport, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Notice.  The subscriber having had his Camera stolen from his Room would inform his friends in Newburyport and vicinity that he has obtained another German Instrument of the best quality, and those who would like a true likeness themselves can have them put up in Gilt Velvet Cases for one Dollar.  James Flanders.  a20.

The third advertisement ran from May 1 to June 18, 1852 in the Newburyport Morning Herald  (Newburyport, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Notice.  The subscriber has returned to Newburyport with his Saloon for a short time, and located at Maj. Shaw’s, Charter Street, where he is ready to execute Pictures; and the inhabitants are respectfully invited to call and see specimens.  Having a Side and Over-head Light together, the deep shade under the chin, & c., are entirely avoided.

Pictures taken over on new plates for 50 cents.

Pictures put up neatly in velvet cases for $1.00  James Flanders. m1.

James Flanders is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry (1850) and A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900 (1851). 


[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

[2] Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900.

Westcott & Dow

1854                Address Unknown, Ogdensburgh, New York.

Westcott & Dow were recorded in one advertisement that ran from January 28 to April, 18, 1854 in the St. Lawrence Republican (Ogdensburgh, New York).  “Excelsior” Daguerreian Car.  Westcott & Dow Would Respectfully Announce to the citizens of Ogdensburgh and vicinity that they will remain in this place a few days with their Mammoth Daguerreian Gallery.

This car is fitted up expressly for this business, having Sky and Side Lights combined.  In this combination of light, which may be used separately if required, the unpleasant shades have been reduced, and mellowness, prominence richness and brilliancy of finish is given to the likeness, rarely found in the most extensive Galleries.

It has become an acknowledged fact that the human countenance can be preserved without decay, and from the long experience and through knowledge of all the improvements appertaining to the art, and the many facilities with which they are enabled to operate in their new Car, they flatter themselves that their work will not suffer in comparison with that of the most popular Artists of the country.

They are now prepared to take pictures of all sizes, from the smallest miniature even to the largest ever taken, at prices ranging from One to Fifteen dollars.  Perfect satisfaction given, or no charge.

Their Stock is also of the best quality, consisting in part of Gold Lockets, Pins, Rings, Bracelets, Jewel, Jenny Lind, Pearl, and French Miniature Cases.  Fancy, French, and Kossuth Frames, of large and small sizes, &c.

Single pictures put up and secured with preservers, for the low price on One Dollar.

Likenesses Of Children taken in from two to three seconds in clear weather.  Adults in all kinds of weather.

Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens, to satisfy themselves.  As they expect to remain but a short time, they would recommend to those who prize the mementoes of departed friends, and would secure their perfect likenesses, to avail themselves of the present opportunity.

Perfect copies of Paintings, Crayons, Daguerreotypes made large or small, as they may require.

N. B—Particular attention given to taking Family Groups.

Hours of operating from 9 to 4 o’clock; Children 10 to 4 o’clock.   

Westcott & Dow are not recorded as being in partnership.  James M. Dow is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Register as being active Watertown and Ogdensburg.  He also records a C. P Wescott or Westcott as being active in Watertown, New York, it is unknown if they are the same person. 

James Welch

1856                On the Public Square, Savannah, Ohio.

James Welch appeared in one announcement in The Ashland Union (Ashland, Ashland County, Ohio) on September, 1856.  Great Democratic Rally—Boarder Ruffianism Triumphant……“Buck and Breck, Constitution and Union,” was the significant motto flung to the breeze, and they gave a pure Buchanier demonstration of their devotion to the Constitution and its guarantees of inalienable rights in a base and ruffianly attack upon the property of an individual for the exercise of his right of free thought.  The Daguerreotype Car of Mr. James Welch has occupied a place upon the public square a sufficient length of time to give it a “local habitation and a name.”  It was asked as a privilege by the Democracy, that they might be allowed to erect their platform upon the shady side of said car.  The privilege was courteously granted, but in doing so he surrendered no right to act with his own property as he saw fit.  He chose therefore to hang out a Republican flag through the sky-light of his car; the moment that this was done the ruffian spirit was predominant;…..

James Welch is not recorded in other photographic directories.