Tag Archives: Boston Massachusetts

Obadiah Rich

1840                Court Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts.[1]

Obadiah Rich was recorded in one advertisement that ran from April 14 to May 4, 1840 in the  Boston Daily Evening Transcript (Boston, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Plates made and for sale by O. Rich, Court Avenue.

The following information is from the Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, fourth edition.  Obadiah Rich was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1809 and died in 1888.  He worked as a silversmith in Boston first under the apprenticeship of Moses Morse.  In 1830 he went into business for himself; 1832-1835 in partnership with Samuel L. Ward; 1835-1850 in association with Jones, Low, and Ball.  “Was an outstanding craftsman who produced a number of exceptionally high quality presentation pieces during his career.”  His hallmark appears to have been an oval with concave sides, O Rich at the top, Boston on the bottom, and in the center a dragon.

Obadiah Rich is recorded in other photographic directories the information from Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, fourth edition may possibly help identify any plates in existence.

[1] A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900.

Dr. Reynolds

ND                  96 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                              1852               Near the Common, Woburn, Massachusetts.

Dr. Reynolds was recorded in one announcement that appeared on April 10, 1852 in the Woburn Journal (Woburn, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotypes.  We have received from a friend the following complimentary notice of the manager of the Daguerreotype Saloon now in town and from our observations are sure that our correspondent is correct as to the quality of pictures taken, as well as the reasonable price charged.

Now is an excellent opportunity to have a likenesses taken, thus saving the trouble and expense of a journey to Boston, and at the same time feeling assured that you will get just as good a picture of Dr. Reynolds as of any of the Boston operators, at one half the expense

Boston, March 29th, 1852.                                                                                                                                      Mr. Editor.— Being called to your thriving village on a matter of business last week, I noticed the Daguerreotype Saloon of Mr. B. P. Batchelder, near the Common.  I desire to say a brief word in relation to the merits of the “Operator” Dr. Reynolds, whose services the proprietors have secured.  The Dr. has been a very successful assistant of the world famed Whipple of this city, whose success in this wonderful art is almost marvelous.  Dr. Reynolds is no pretender but an educated practical chemist, and the inhabitants of Woburn can now rely upon receiving as perfect a picture at their own doors, as they can possibly obtain by a journey to Boston, and at about one half the price.  Families desiring groups, or the pictures of their little ones will find this an opportunity which will not again soon occur.  Knowing what I here state to be entirely correct, I hope that the Dr. will receive the patronage he so well merits.  R.

Dr. Reynolds is not recorded in other photographic directories.

James Pierpont

Ca. 1850-1851   Address Unknown, San Francisco, California.[1]                                                  1857                      109 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.[2]

James Pierpont was listed in Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians. (New York, New York.)  P. 1409.

Born in Boston 1822,                                                                                                                                          Died Winter Haven, Fla. 1893                                                                                                                        Father John Pierpont was an abolitionist minister in Boston and held the rank of Brig. General in the Union Army during the Civil War.                                                                                        James joined the confederacy during the Civil War.                                                                        James was also an American composer

Jingle Bells, or The One Horse Open Sleigh (1859) which did not become popular until the 20th century.  His best known works were the Little White Cottage, or Gentle Nettie Moore (1857);  We Conquer or Die (1861); and Strike for the South (1863).

2016 December 8.  On line article in BU Today “Jingle Bells”…Pierpont could not have written “Jingle Bells”  in a Medford tavern in 1850, because in 1850, he was in California trying in vain to cash in on the Gold Rush.  He did enjoy some small measure of success as a daguerreotype artist, at least until an 1851 San Francisco fire burned down his shop.  He returned to Boston broke.

James Pierpont is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Boston in 1857.

[1] On-line article in BU Today News, Opinion Community.  December 8, 2016 by Joel Brown.  “Jingle Bells” History takes surprising tern beloved Christmas favorite was first performed in Boston Minstrel Hall.  (Research by Kyna Hamill).

[2] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Mr. Palmer

1853                215 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

Mr. Palmer was recorded in one advertisement that ran in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript (Boston, Massachusetts) on February 26, 1853.  Daguerreotype Portrait Painting.  Photographic Portraits are taken with all the recent improvements adopted in the process in France, England and America, by Palmer & Co., 215 Washington street Boston.

Photographic Portrait Painting (sun painting) now takes its place by the side of pencil drawing.  By painting with instruments an outline of mathematical precision is obtained which can scarcely be expected with the hand; and by judicious employment of chemicals and the careful use of color, the finest tone and finish imparted to the picture.   Landscapes and Portraits are taken with equal exactness and fidelity—valuable pieces of sculpture are copied in high relief—and minute Portraits are executed for lockets, broaches, pins and rings.  Unless we are prepared to quarrel with the sun and dispute the laws of nature, we must admit that the trust and most perfect portrait may be obtained by the Daguerreotype.  For specimens see case at the door, 215 Washington St.

Mr. Palmer is not listed in other photographic directories nor was he listed in the Boston City Directory; residence section from 1851-1854.

Alexander Gibbs Nye

ND                  Address Unknown, Plymouth, Massachusetts.                                                        1844                62 Milk Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                                                1853                Address Unknown, Weymouth, Massachusetts.

Information from A Genealogy of the Nye Family, 1907. p.379-380.  Dr. Alexander Gibbs Nye, born at Falmouth, Massachusetts, August 24, 1817, and died in Weymouth, Massachusetts, October 7, 1901.  In early life he was a painter and worked several years at that trade in Boston and New York, and on one occasion he went to Mobile and New Orleans.  He studied higher art and achieved some fame as a portrait and sketch painter.  Later he took up the Daguerreotype business and carried it on extensively for several years in Plymouth, Massachusetts, afterward moving to Boston and them to Weymouth.  Afterwards he gave his attention to dentistry…

Alexander Gibbs Nye is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Boston and Weymouth but not in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  It is possibly he is the same A. Nye selling his daguerrean apparatus in 1847 in yesterday’s post.

A. Nye

1847                475 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

A. Nye was recorded in one advertisement that ran from February 23 to 26, 1847 in The Daily Chronotype (Boston, Massachusetts).  Important To Daguerreotype Artists.  A Complete Apparatus And Fixture for the business, for sale at a great sacrifice.  Apply to A. Nye, 475 Washington st.

A. Nye is not listed in other photographic directories as being active in Boston, Massachusetts in 1847.  It is possible that this is Alexander Gibbs Nye who was first active prior to 1844 in Plymouth, Massachusetts and in 1844 in Boston and in 1853 in Weymouth.  It is possible while in Boston in 1847 he is selling his apparatus and not actively practicing photography.  See Alexander Gibbs Nye in tomorrows post.

L. W. F. Mark

Ca. 1859          20 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                                 ND                     Address and Location Unknown.

L. W. F. Mark was recorded from a facsimile of a broadside. From (Jim Foster’s Classy Camera, Urbana, IL.) with notes. Ca. 1859.

Photographs!  Ambrotypes.  L. W. Mark, Late of Boston, has now the pleasure of informing the inhabitants of this town and vicinity, that he has taken rooms at

__________________________

for a few days only, for the purpose of taking Photographs, Ambrotypes & Lettertypes.  With superior German Instruments, and the best Stock, he is prepared to take Group or single Miniatures at the lowest prices, and trusts he can please even the most fastidious.

At this Establishment, all are allowed to sit and make changes until satisfied with a likeness.

The supply of Plain and Fancy Cases, Frames, and Life-like Likenesses, and the terms at which they are furnished, he trusts will be an inducement to call and see specimens, if not to patronize.

Copying and all that pertains to the art done at short notice.—Pictures of Deceased Persons taken at their residences; Views, &c.

Parents wishing Miniatures of their Children, will please come in the fore part of the day, as the light is stronger and better.  Come One, Come All, Give the Lame Man a Call!  L. W. F. Mark.

“Twenty-two original broadsides were found with much of the photographers camera equipment.  He was born and raised in Keene, New Hampshire.  In the 1850’s he worked as an apprentice at a Boston Daguerreian Gallery located at 20 Washington Street.  In a letter to his mother dated 1859 he wrote I live in a gentleman’s hotel and looking around at all the potential Customers…he purchased two of Roberts, Box-in-a-Box Daguerrian cameras one ¼ plate and one ½ plate, plate holders, tripod, and other materials for wet-plate photography.  He returned to Keene, New Hampshire and became town clerk.

L. W. F. Mark is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Miss. Margaret M. MacFarlane

Ca. 1858-1860            268 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                            Ca. 1858-1860            365 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                1859                               Address Unknown, Boston, Massachusetts.

Miss. Margaret M. MacFarlane was recorded in the Boston City Directory and two advertising cards.   Ca. 1858-1860  9th plate advertising card in the back of an ambrotype in my collection.  Miss. M. MacFarlane Operator at the Ambrotype Rooms, 268 Washington St., Boston.  (Up Only One Flight .)  Pictures taken in all weather; and all warranted.  Prices from 25 Cents to $20.  Likenesses set in Lockets, Pins, and Fancy Cases.  Copying neatly and carefully executed.  Sick & Deceased Persons taken at their residence.  Miss MacFarlane has long been an operator in these rooms.

Ca. 1858-1860  9th plate advertising card in the back of an ambrotype in private collection.  Miss. M. MacFarlane Operator at the Ambrotype Rooms, 268 Washington St., Boston.  (Up Only One Flight .)  Pictures taken in all weather; and all warranted.  Prices from 25 Cents to $20.  Likenesses set in Lockets, Pins, and Fancy Cases.  Copying neatly and carefully executed.  Sick & Deceased Persons taken at their residence.  Miss MacFarlane has long been an operator in these rooms.

Ca. 1858-1860  9th plate advertising card in the Bostonian Society collection.  Miss. M. MacFarlane has taken the Ambrotype Rooms at 365 Washington St., Boston, (Melodeon Building).  Miss. M. has long been an operator in these rooms.

Miss. Margaret M. MacFarlane is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Boston in 1859 without a business address.

 

James L. Lyons

1846                Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

James L. Lyons was recorded in an advertisement ran that from January 10 to February 19, 1846 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Daguerreotype Several Furnishing Establishments and Sole Agency for the sale of Voigtlaender’s Apparatus.

The genuine Voigtlaender Apparatus, also the best plates, Chemicals, Polishing Materials and Morocco Cases, &c., &c. may be procured at the subscribers’, wholesale and retail, by addressing (post paid) to W. & F. Langenheim, Exchange, Philadelphia, or Langenheim & Beckers, 201 Broadway, N. Y.

The following gentlemen have agreed to act as Agents for the sale of the genuine Voigtlaender Apparatus:–

Messrs. Litch & Whipple, Boston, Mass.                                                                                                          Mr. James L. Lyon, Richmond, Va.                                                                                                                      Mr. S. Broadbent, Columbia, S. C.                                                                                                                      Mr. James P. Perry, Charleston, S. C.                                                                                                                  Mr. S. Noessel, New Orleans.                                                                                                                        Messrs. Johnson & Jacobs, New Orleans.                                                                                                        W. & F. Langenheim, Exchange, Philadelphia.

James Laurence Lyon listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in Richmond, Virginia in 1844 at 33½  Main Street, this is possibly the same person.

D. G. Lougee

1849                257 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                          1850                85 Main Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

D. G. Lougee was mentioned in two advertisements in the Norfolk County Journal (Roxbury, Massachusetts). The first advertisement ran from April 27 to June 29, 1850. Roxbury Daguerrian Gallery At The Old Stand, In Lemist Building, 82 Washington St., Corner of Felton Place, Over Lemist and Kellogg’s Dry Goods Store.

Miniatures, single or in groups, taken in the best manner, without regard to weather, and warranted not to fade.  An idea has prevailed that, in time, pictures would fade, but this erroneous impression has been entirely removed by many eminent chemists, who give it as their opinion that a Daguerreotype Picture, coated with a solution of gold, will stand any length of time; and no respectable operator will send out a picture without this gilding.

Ladies are recommended to dress in figured or dark material, avoiding white or light blue.  Gentlemen, a black or figured vest, also figured scarf or cravat, so that the shirt bosom will not be too much exposed.  Children, plain and stripped, or figured dresses, avoiding white or light blue; red will take like a dark dress.  Children taken from 9, A. M., to 2, P. M.; others from 8, A. M. till 6, P. M., without regard to weather.  Lancey & Co.

N.B…Messrs. Lancey & Co. Having fitted up an extensive Daguerrian Establishment in the City of Charlestown, in connection with Mr. Jenkins, under the name of Jenkins & Co., and engaged the valuable services of Mr. Lougee to superintend the operating department, would recommend the citizens of Charlestown and vicinity if they wish to get an excellent Daguerreotype Likeness of themselves and friends, to give Mr. L. a call at the Daguerrian Gallery, 85 Main st., Charlestown.  April 27th, 1850.

The second advertisement ran from June 29 to November 9, 1850.  Price Reduced.  Miniatures taken Lower than at any other Establishment and warranted not to fade.

Roxbury Daguerrian Gallery At The Old Stand, In Lemist Building, 82 Washington St., Corner of Felton Place, Over Lemist and Kellogg’s Dry Goods Store.

Miniatures, single or in groups, taken in the best manner, without regard to weather, and warranted not to fade.  An idea has prevailed that, in time, pictures would fade, but this erroneous impression has been entirely removed by many eminent chemists, who give it as their opinion that a Daguerreotype Picture, coated with a solution of gold, will stand any length of time; and no respectable operator will send out a picture without this gilding.

Ladies are recommended to dress in figured or dark material, avoiding white or light blue.  Gentlemen, a black or figured vest, also figured scarf or cravat, so that the shirt bosom will not be too much exposed.  Children, plain and stripped, or figured dresses, avoiding white or light blue; red will take like a dark dress.  Children taken from 9, A. M., to 2, P. M.; others from 8, A. M. till 6, P. M., without regard to weather.  Lancey & Co.

N.B…Messrs. Lancey & Co. Having fitted up an extensive Daguerrian Establishment in the City of Charlestown, in connection with Mr. Jenkins, under the name of Jenkins & Co., and engaged the valuable services of Mr. Lougee to superintend the operating department, would recommend the citizens of Charlestown and vicinity if they wish to get an excellent Daguerreotype Likeness of themselves and friends, to give Mr. L. a call at the Daguerrian Gallery, 85 Main st., Charlestown.   April 27th, 1850.

D. G. Lougee is recorded in A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers 1939-1900 and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1849 in Boston.