Tag Archives: Photographer

George W. Manly

1855-1858                   Carey’s Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.                                                      1858-1859                   Schillings’ Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.

George W. Manly was recorded in four advertisements and three announcements in the Anti-Slavery Bugle (New-Lisbon, Ohio).  The first advertisement ran from June 23, 1855 to March 22, 1856.  Geo. W. Manly, Daguerreian Artist!  Carey’s Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.

The second advertisement ran from March 29, 1856 to February 6, 1858.  Geo. W. Manly, Ambrotype And Daguerrian Artist!  Carey’s Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.

The first announcement appeared on  August 22, 1857.  Photograph Oil Pictures.—Manly at his Daguerreian and Photograph rooms immediately under the Bugle office, gets up pictures in the best style of the art, and is ever ready to give his patrons the benefit of all valuable improvements in his business.  The most recent and beautiful of these is that of transferring photographs to paper in oil, giving them the appearance and it is said, the durability of oil paintings.  The pictures are really magnificent, and we recommend our friends who have occasion for the services of an artist to call on Mr. Manly before sitting elsewhere.  One advantage of these pictures is, that being on card board, they can be sent by mail, if desired, with only the ordinary expense of letter postage.  They can also be afforded at reduced prices.

The third advertisement ran from January 2, 1858 to May 14, 1859.  Geo. W. Manly, Ambrotype And Daguerrian Artist!  Schillings’ Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.

The second announcement appeared on  February 12, 1859.  G, W. Manley, so long and so favorably known in Salem as an accomplished artist, is about to open rooms in Akron, (though his numerous patrons will rejoice to learn he is not to close those he now occupies.)  We have pleasure in recommending Mr. Manly to our readers in Summit county, as a prompt and attentive business man, and skilful in his profession.  Those who patronize him may rely upon having good pictures in good style, either ambrotypes, or photographs.

The fourth advertisement ran from May 29, 1859 to December 31, 1859.  George W. Manly, Ambrotype And Photograph Artist!  Schillings’ Block, Main Street, Salem, Ohio.

The third announcement appeared on  December 17, 1859.  Likeness of John Brown.—Manley, of this place, has a photograph likeness of John Brown, which he sells at 50 cts.  We are unable to speak of its accuracy from personal knowledge, but the artist assures us it is a good likeness.

George W. Manly is listed in other photographic directories as being active in Akron and Salem, Ohio (1859-1860).  This is possibly the same Manly who was active in Salem in the firm of Manly & Carpenter (1853-1855).

Mr. Mackleme

1859                            Address Unknown, Rocky Mount, Louisiana.

Mr. Mackleme was recorded in one advertisement that ran from September 23 to October 7, 1859 in The Bossier Banner (Bellevue, Bossier Parish, Louisiana).  Ambrotypes!  Mr. Mackleme, would respectfully inform the citizens of Rocky Mount, and vicinity, that he is now prepared to take Ambrotypes, Photographs, and Melanotypes, in all sizes; and put up in all kinds of cases, rings, lockets, &c. satisfaction guaranteed or no pay.  Give him a call.

Mr. Mackleme is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J.  M. McPherson

1857-1859       Corner of Church and College Streets, Burlington, Vermont.

J.  M. McPherson was recorded in two advertisements in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  The first advertisement ran from August 7 to November 20, 1857.  Ambrotype and Photograph Gallery Corner of Church and College Streets, Burlington, Vermont.  The subscribers would respectfully invite the attention of the public to their new and never changing pictures that they are now making at their rooms.  These pictures are acknowledged by all to be far superior to any others of the art.  Pictures taken equally as well in cloudy as in clear weather.  Children taken of any age.  Copies taken from Daguerreotypes, Photographs, &c., and enlarged.  Pictures of invalids or deceased persons taken at their residences.  Instructions given in the art.  J. M. McPherson & Co.

The second advertisement ran from October 23, 1857 to May 20, 1859.  Ambrotypes & Photographs The Finest And Most Durable Pictures are the Ambrotypes and Photographs.  Ambrotypes put up with a black stained glass are the only glass pictures that can be relied upon not to change.  There is no Black Varnish crack in cold weather, or Balsam to blister with the heat as in all other glass pictures.  The Photograph is superior to any other pictures.  The Photograph is superior to any other picture made on paper.  For proof please call at McPherson’s Gallery, corner of Church and College streets, Burlington, Vt.  J. M. McPherson.

J. M. McPherson is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Burlington, Vermont in 1858 and 1859.

J. W. McCormac

1856-1858       West side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, Clarksville,                                     Tennessee.                                                                                                                                1857                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                                  1858                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                              1857-1858       Gallery over the Northern Bank, Clarksville, Tennessee.

J. W. McCormac was recorded in six advertisements and ten announcements. The first advertisement ran from January 9 to November 18, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec. 5, ’56). Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50.             Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The first announcement appeared in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee)  on April 17, 1857.  The improvement and advancements that have been made, of late years, in the arts of Photographing and Daguerreotyping, are really astonishing, and they both seem now, to have reached perfection.  We have been led to this conclusion by seeing, within the past few days, some of the work in this art, by our friend, M’Cormac, whose gallery is over the late Democratic Reading Room—next door to the Northern Bank.  We do not hesitate to pronounce his work superior to any we have ever before seen.  He fully understands his business, and spares no pains nor expense to avail himself of every improvement in the art; and the result is that, for distinctness of impression, for tone, relief, attitude, naturalness, and high finish, his work is unsurpassed.  As we said before, we have lately examined some of it, and we were absolutely astonished at his excellence.  Every one who wants a picture of himself, or herself, or of any friend, should call on Mr. M’Cormac, at once, and procure it.  They will never have an opportunity to get a better one than he will take.  He has an elegant room, fine sky-light, first-class instruments, and every thing necessary to the execution of fine work; and his charges are moderate.  Call at his gallery, and see some of his elegant pictures, even if for no other purpose, for they are really most elegant specimens of a wonderful art.

We would say to mother’s particularly, that Mr. M’Cormac is singularly skillful and fortunate in taking pictures of children, and but rarely fails to get an excellent likeness.

The second advertisement ran from Oct 30 to November 13, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn from Mr. McCormac, the celebrated Photographist of Clarksville, that he intends paying us a visit soon.—He is a splendid artist and our citizens will have an opportunity of procuring a fine colored photograph equal to an oil painting.—Hop. Mercury.

The third advertisement ran from October 13, 1857 to October 8, 1858 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our friend McCormac, has attained to the ne plus ultra point, in the art of Daguerreotyping and photographing.  All who feel any interest in the fine arts, whether they want to invest anything in it or not, should call at Mr. McCormac’s gallery, and see to what great perfection he has arrived in his profession; and those who want a first-rate portrait of themselves or friend, should at once avail themselves of Mac’s ability to furnish the very best.

He has supplied himself with everything necessary to his profession, and is prepared to take photographs of every size—from miniature to life-size; and has secured the co-operative service of an excellent portrait painter, to color them from the living subject, and thus secure as good if not a far more accurate portrait than can be procured in any other way.

Mr. McCormac continues to furnish pictures of every other kind, of the very best quality, and at low prices.  In fact he can furnish good likenesses at prices ranging from one to one hundred dollars.  His gallery is on the second floor of the building next to the Northern Bank.

The fourth advertisement appeared on  October 30, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec.5, ’56).  Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50. Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The fifth advertisement appeared on November 13, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  M’cCormac’s Gallery of Photography In All Its Branches.  Pictures of every style and size taken.  Lowest price $1; highest price $75.  Persons having daguerreotypes of deceased friends can have them enlarged to Photographs of the size of life, and colored in oil on canvas or paper, with an accuracy not to be obtained in any other way.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.  Rooms west side of the Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct 1, ’57.

The second announcement appeared on November 20, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We are pleased to see that our clever friend and accomplished artist, Mr. S. W. Price, has returned to our city, to remain a short time.  We are shown a specimen of his skill, in the way of coloring upon the Photograph likeness of our Editor.  It is certainly a fine specimen of art.

If, with McCormac to take the picture, and Price to do the coloring, our senior’s face is not well taken, then there is no use in any one else trying.  In our opinion, this Photograph cannot be surpassed.

The third announce appeared on March 26, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our Friend McCormac is still taking some of the finest Photographic pictures that we have ever seen.  You should by all means pay a visit to his gallery.

On May 7, 1858 the fourth announcement appeared in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, the excellent Photographic artist, has returned from a visit to Hopkinsville [Kentucky] where he has been professionally engaged for a few weeks.  Let all who desire a good likeness, of any description, call and see him at his gallery over the Northern Bank.

The fifth announcement appeared on May 21, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Mr. Price is again in our midst Mr. Price is a painter of decided merit, and if evidence of that fact were wanting, his picture of that fact were wanting, his picture of Mr. Fillmore is sufficient to place the matter beyond a doubt.  Mr. Price is also a high-toned and honorable gentleman, and we bespeak for him a liberal share of patronage.  We presume he will resume his employment as colorer of Photographers for Mr. W. J. McCormac.  Success attend them both.

The sixth announcement appeared on October 15, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Among the many improvements of Science, There has perhaps been none more pleasing to us, than the beautiful art of Photography, the rapid strides it has made are surprising.  It is only a few years ago, since the Daguerreotype was the only kind of picture taken by the aid of chemistry; now there is the Ambrotype on glass; the Melainotype on iron; the Photograph on paper and a host of others.  The community are indebted to those gentlemen, whose persevering researches have perfected this most valuable art against scientific and chemical difficulties, that none but the initiated can rightly understand.

Certainly not last, or least of those “devotees of the Sun,” is our friend McCormac, whose work will stand comparison with that of any gallery North or South.  A visit to his rooms will prove that Clarksville is not behind the time in Photography, and his life size Photographs are perfect gems. This process is the most valuable of the whole art.  Daguerreotypes not larger than a small locket, are enlarged to the size of life.  A small “negative” copy is first taken, and then by the use of a powerful lens is magnified on canvass and permanently fixed there; it is then placed in the painters hands where, under the skillful brush, it grows to a beautiful and life-like picture—the drawing must be correct as it is done by the great limner the sun.

As a Photographer, Mr. McCormac stands in the first ranks of his profession, and has striven most earnestly to bring the Art to the highest state of perfection here in Clarksville.  We are much pleased to see that in fine weather his rooms are crowded daily.

The sixth advertisement from October 22, 1858 to December 23, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, Practical Photographist, makes pictures in every style of the art, from the smallest miniature up to life-size Photographs.—Instruction given in any or all of the branches.  Rooms west side Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct. 1, ’58.

The seventh announcement appeared on March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  “Secure the shadow ere the substance fade.”  Now that the weather has cleared off beautifully and Spring has taken the place of old winter, we would advise every one who wishes to preserve their own portraits or that of their friends to call immediately at MacCormac’s Photographic Gallery where he is prepared to get them up from , the smallest to life-size, in the very best style.  He has some of the best life specimens that can be produced anywhere Call and examine them.

The eighth announcement appeared on  March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  If you want a visiting card with your likeness on one corner, McCormac can furnish it.  This style is the “latest agony.” And there is an appropriateness in it which can not fail to impress those who see it.  The Likeness is a photograph, and can be multiplied indefinitely.

The ninth announcement appeared on July 15, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn that Mr. MacCormac intends starting for Europe next week, for the purpose of studying all the latest improvements in Photography.—WE wish his trip may bring him all the pleasure and profit his energy and enterprise most certainly deserve.  Mac stands deservedly high in his profession, and seems determined to spare no effort to keep ahead of all, in his beautiful art.  That’s the right spirit Mac, let the Allies and Austrians do the fighting, and you attend strictly to Photographing.

The tenth announcement appeared on October 28, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our artist-friend, McCormac, seems determined not to be behind any body in anything that pertains to his business.  His photographic gallery has long been known as a repository rich in gems of art, but its attractiveness has lately been greatly enhanced.  But few of our readers know to what expense and trouble Mr. McCormac has gone in perfecting himself in every department of the beautiful art to which he has devoted himself.  For years past he has studied it with zeal of an enthusiast, and availed himself promptly of every improvement made in it.  During the past summer he has visited most of our larger cities, and several in Europe, in all  of which he had free access to the galleries of art, and full communication with all artist of note in his line, thus adding largely to his own skill and knowledge, and perfecting himself in all the recent improvements in his profession.  Mr. McCormac deserves great credit for the manner in which he has labored to accomplish what he has done. And for the establishment here of a gallery of art that has done honor to the town; and he should be met with, and sustained by, the full patronage of the community.

He furnishes pictures in every style—from the smallest daguerreotype up to the life-size photograph—plain, or colored, at a very moderate charges; and when the life-like image of kindred and friends can be so easily obtained, no one should neglect to procure it.

J. W. McCormac is not listed in other photographic directories.

McCormac & Aubry

1858-1859       Address Unknown, Clarksville, Tennessee.

McCormac & Aubry (J. W. McCormac) were listed in one advertisement that ran from October 15, 1858 to October 28, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Gallery of Photography!  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, &C.  Albumine and Waxpaper process for views and landscapes.  Pictures put in Pins and Lockets with care and neatness.  Stock and Chemicals for sale.

Our patrons can now have their old Daguerreotypes of deceased friends enlarged to life size Photographs on canvas, and painted in oil, by one of the first Portrait Painters in the country; thus securing a better likeness than by any other method. We respectfully invite an examination of our work.       McCormac & Aubry.

McCormac & Aubry are not listed in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list W. J. McCormack as being active in Clarksville, Tennessee from 1857-1860 on the West side of the Public Square between Main and Franklin Streets.

John S. McClure

1856-1857       Rooms Over G. A. Neafus’ Clothing Store, Clinton, Louisiana.                          1857                   Rooms in the Court House, Houma, Louisiana.

John S. McClure was recorded in two advertisements and two announcements. The first advertisement ran from November 29, 1856 to January 17, 1857 in The Feliciana Democrat  (Clinton, Louisiana).   New Picture Gallery.  John S. McClure & Co., Would respectfully announce to the citizens of Clinton and vicinity, that they have just opened an Ambrotype, Sphereotype, and Daguerreian Saloon, over G. A. Neafus’ clothing store.

Six years constant practice of the art, together with the recent improvement which they have added, and the use of C. C. Harrison’s improved Mammoth Camera, enables them to offer rare inducements to all desirous of obtaining perfect and imperishable types of friends and loved ones ere decay’s effacing fingers have swept the lines where beauty lingers.  Hear what Mr. E. Author, who conducts one of the largest establishments in the United States, says of these new improved instruments:  “C. C. Harrison’s improved patent Extra Camera, will add another victory to American skill, and give photography a new impulse.”

J. S.—No one will be expected to take a picture unless perfectly satisfied, but a decision must be made at once, as all pictures are considered sold when once pronounced satisfactory.  J. S. McClure, S. L. Hall.

The first announcement appeared on February 28, 1857 in the Houma Ceres (Houma,  Louisiana).  Ambrotypes.—Mr. McClure, Daguerrean artist, is now occupying rooms in the Court House, where he is producing some lovely pictures by the above incomparable process.  Now is the time to secure a picture.  When a near and dear friend has gone to that bourne from whence no traveler returns, what a priceless treasure is one of those sun-painted miniatures.

The second advertisement ran from February 28 to March 21, 1857 in the Houma Ceres (Houma, Louisiana).  Ambrotypes.  The subscriber respect announces to the citizens of Houma that he will remain in town but a few days longer, Only.  Those desirous of availing themselves of this opportunity to secure likenesses by this unrivalled process, will please call at his rooms in the Court House as early as possible, as his engagements are such that he Cannot Remain Long.  Come and examine specimens, at least.  John S. McClure.

The second announcement appeared on March 21, 1857 in the Houma Ceres (Houma, Louisiana).  Mr. McClure is still in town taking those inimitable ambrotype likenesses.  Those requiring his services would do well to call soon at his rooms in the Court House.  See Card.

John S. McClure and S. L. Hall are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. McCarty

1857                  Room in Beaver’s Building, next to the Telegraph office, Lewisburg,                                                  Pennsylvania.                                                                                                                        1857-1858       Rooms above Christ & Caldwell’s Drug Store, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Mr. McCarty was recorded in two advertisements and one announcement in the Lewisburg Chronicle (Lewisburg, Pennsylvania).  The first advertisement ran from February 6 to May 26, 1857.  This Way, Ladies and Gentlemen!  For good, durable, cheap and beautiful Pictures.

Ambrotype Likenesses of a very superior quality on a new and improved  plan, far surpassing the Daguerreotype.  They are not reversed, but show everything in its true position—are without the glare of the Daguerreotype, and hence may be seen in any view; they are taken in one fifth of the time of a Daguerreotype, and therefore better for taking small Children, which require but a second in a bright light, and on dark or rainy days are taken as quick as Daguerreotypes in the clearest days; they are far more durable than any picture ever made by light, being taken on plate glass to which another plate of the same is hermetically sealed with an indestructible cement, by which the picture retains its brilliancy for ages; and it will not corrode by acids, nor injured by weather or climate.

Copies of Daguerreotypes, Oil Paintings, engravings, or any other object whatever, are made by this process finer than by any other known.  Portraits set in elegant frames of morocco, or fancy cases, gold lockets, breast pins, finger rings, &c. &c. at short notice.

Also, Daguerreotypes which for true and faithful life likenesses are not surpassed.  Of either of the above mentioned species of Portraits, the value is undeniable.  They lighten the sorrows of absence or death, by granting us to behold a beloved relative or prized friend almost as distinctly as if present.  Mother!  father!  sisters!  brothers!  Friends!  what would you not give if the faces of the lost might still and ever smile upon you as in life?  Then procure Portraits ere too late!

Charges moderate, and Likenesses warranted to please.  Daguerreotypes, Paintings, Drawings, &c. copied.  Out-door Views and Miniatures of Deceased Persons taken at the shortest notice.  Remember the place—Room in Beaver’s building, next the Telegraph office, Lewisburg. M’Carty, Artist.  We Study To Please.

The announcement appeared on May 22, 1857.  M’Carty, Daguerrean Artist, has stopped in Lewisburg several months, and done a very large and satisfactory business.  His pictures are clear and life-like, and prices moderate.  Next Wednesday he will finish his visit here, and all who desire one of his pictures, should call on or before that time, as he will positively leave next morning.  Rooms next to the chronicle and Telegraph office.

The second advertisement ran from October 2, 1857 to October 1, 1858.  M’Carty, the Cheap Picture Man, Back Again!  We take this method of informing the citizens of Lewisburg and surrounding country, that we are again with them for a short time, and now offer them a better article at lower prices than ever heretofore.  We have taken the old stand above Christ & Caldwell’s Drug Store, and having much better light than we had in our old rooms, and more convenient rooms in every respect, we shall be better able to accommodate.  Persons having pictures of deceased friends or relatives which they would like to have copied or transferred to paper on a much larger scale, can have it done on short notice, and the copies will be warranted to be equally as good , and sometimes better than those which they are taken from.  Persons wanting Photographs can have them for prices ranging from $5 to $20.  Pictures of persons confined to their rooms through sickness, and of deceased persons taken at the shortest notice, at their residences:  pictures of young children taken in one second in a bright light.  Outdoor Views of buildings, &c., taken to order.  Ambrotype pictures taken on dark and rainy days quicker than Daguerreotypes on the clearest and brightest.  Pictures from 50 cts. to $20, to suit the purchaser.  We extend a cordial invitation to all to call and see us and examine our specimens, whether they want pictures or not.  Remember the place, rooms over Christ & Caldwell’s Mammoth Drug Store.  We study to please.  M’Carty, Artist.

N. B.—Instructions given in the art, and apparatus furnished at the lowest prices. Persons wishing to learn the business can now have an opportunity not often met with.

Mr. McCarty is not recorded in other photograph directories as being in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Mrs. W. D. McAllaster

1852-1854       Rooms over Mr. Elmendorf’s Dentistry Office, Penn-Yan, New York.              1854-1856        Rooms over the Yates Co. Whig Office, opposite the American Hotel, Penn-                                   Yan, New York.

Mrs. W. D. McAllaster was recorded in ten advertisement and two announcements in the Penn Yan Democrat. (Penn-Yan, New York).  The first advertisement was recorded on June 1, 1852, but the publication date at the end of the advertisement was May 11, 1852.  M’Allaster’s

Gallery In Full Operation.  Mrs. M’Allaster would respectfully announce to the citizens of Penn Yan and vicinity, that notwithstanding Mr. M’Allaster health is such that he cannot wait upon those desiring pictures, that she is confident that she can take pictures in the Very Best Style, as she has had a long experience in the business, and as she has also had the very best facilities for acquiring the Art in all its branches, together with the latest improvements.

As proof of this the public have only to call and examine the specimens she is daily taking to be satisfied, and she earnestly solicits  the patronage of the friends of this long established and well known Gallery, and as many new patrons as may favor her with a call.

Remember that unless a Picture gives entire satisfaction you are not required to purchase the same.  I have one of the best Sky-Lights in the country.  Recollect the place, nearly opposite the Yates Co. Bank, in the third Story of Elmendorf’s Building.  Penn Yan, May 11, 1852.

The first announcement appeared on August 24, 1852.   Fine Pictures.—See Mrs. McAllaster’s advertisement, and after reading it go and get your likeness taken by her.  She is one of the most finished artists in the country, and cannot be beaten in taking daguerrean likenesses.

The second advertisement ran from August 24 to October 12, 1852.  Beautiful Pictures.  Mrs. McAllaster wishes to notify the public that she continues the business of daguerreotyping, so long carried on in this place by her husband, until his health became so poor as to compel him to keep his room.  Mrs. McA. Pledges herself to make as good pictures as can be produced in the State.  She has had the Experience and now she has the facilities to enable her to fulfill this pledge.—Pictures of the various sizes, and put up in all styles, furnished at a few minutes notice.

Persons are invited to call and examine specimens.  A share of the public patronage is solicited.  Operating Rooms over Mr. Elmendorf’s Dentistry Office, in the third story.

The third advertisement ran from October 12, 1852 to September 20, 1853.  Daguerrian Gallery.  Mrs. MacAllaster would respectfully inform the citizens of Penn-Yan & vicinity that she is now prepared (at her old stand) to waite upon all who may favor her with a call and fells confident that she can give them as good a picture as they can obtain at any other establishment.  New York or Rochester not excepted.

She has just received a Large and Handsome variety of Cases and Lockets, and will be ready at all times to supply them with Pictures, Either Single or in Groups.  All who desire Good Pictures will do well to call at her rooms where they can be accommodated at all times, in cloudy as well as clear weather.  I have an excellent light, together with every other facility, for taking the very best pictures, which I will warrant to give perfect satisfaction.  Terms Reasonable.  Rooms over J. Elmendorf’s Dentistry Shop, 3rd story, opposite the Yates Co. Bank.

The fourth advertisement ran from September 24 to December 27, 1853.  Pictures Painted by the Sun.  Mrs. McAllaster continues to take the best Daguerrean Portraits, finished in the most complete and beautiful style, at her rooms, in the third story over Elmendorf’s Dentistry Office.  By long experience at the business, she has acquired a superior knowledge of the Art, and does her work by the most perfect process.  Her facilities are unequalled for giving the best satisfaction in every branch of her business.  In all kinds of weather she will compel the sun to paint the most superb and perfect Likenesses.  They will be put up in cases at a cost according to the taste of the customers.  Her business is largely increased, but she will endeavor to satisfy all who will call, on short notice.

The second announcement appeared on October 11, 1852.  List of Premiums, Awarded at the Yates Co. Fair and Cattle Show, for 1853….Class 25—Discretionary Premiums…          Mrs. McAllister, for her magnificent collection of Daguerreotypes and Daguerreotype cases exhibited, was awarded $1 and diploma.

The fifth advertisement ran on May 16 & 23, 1854. Removal Pictures Painted by the Sun.  Mrs. McAllaster continues to take the best Daguerrean Portraits, finished in the most complete and beautiful style, at her Rooms, third story, over the Yates Co. Whig Office, opposite the American Hotel—entrance between Stanford & Kinners’ Boot and Shoe, and T. F. Sharpe & Co.’s Dry Good Stores.  By long experience at the business, she has acquired a superior knowledge of the Art, and does her work by the most perfect process.  Her facilities are unequalled for giving the best satisfaction in every branch of her business.  In all kinds of weather she will compel the sun to paint the most superb and perfect Likenesses.  They will be put up in cases at a cost according to the taste of the customers.  Her business is largely increased, but she will endeavor to satisfy all who will call, on short notice.

The sixth advertisement ran from January 17 to March 14, 1855.  Daguerreotypes For 75 Cts.  Mrs. W. D. McAllaster would respectfully announce to the citizens of Penn Yan and vicinity, that she has again taken possession of her Daguerrean Rooms Opposite The American Hotel and immediately over the Whig office, where she will take Daguerreotypes of the common medium size, put up in common cases.  For Seventy-Five Cents, For One Month Only!

Having acquired a superior knowledge of my profession, and just returned from New York with an extensive variety of the best material used in the Daguerrean business, I take this method of inducing my old friends and patrons to give me a call, and to inform them that I am again permanently located in Penn Yan.

Having spared no pains or expense in refitting my rooms to make them convenient and pleasant, I trust that all who wish to examine my work will give me a call.

Parents now is your time to get the Daguerreotypes of your children, and remember it is but for a short time that such low prices will continue, and you should avail yourselves of this opportunity before it is too late, for such inducements may never again be offered in Penn Yan.

The attention of artists is also invited to her stock in trade.  She has just received a new and beautiful lot of Cases, which she offers very low for cash.  Also every variety of articles used in the business for sale at New York prices.  Artists will do well to call before purchasing elsewhere.  Remember the place, opposite the American Hotel.

Seventh advertisement ran from June 20, 1855 to January 2, 1856.  Daguerrean Hall!  Opposite the American Hotel.  The subscriber having just returned from the city, is now prepared to furnish her numerous patrons and friends with all the most recent improvements in her beautiful art, among which she calls particular attention to Cynocular Stroscope & Crayon Daguerreotypes.  Which have lately been so prized in the City, and to her Styroscoped Pictures and Cases, which enlarge the picture to life size, and gives such relief, fullness and life-like appearance as to impress us with the actual presence of the person, rather than that we are looking at their picture.  Also, several new styles of Fancy and Magic back grounds, which give a fine relief and effect to the picture, and does away with the monotony presented by the time-honored drab.

Advancement is peculiarly the motto of the age, as well as of the beautiful art she has chosen as her profession; therefore, an admiring public are continually calling for something new and novel in the Art, and she intends, if diligent researches, perseverance, industry, time and money, added to several years practice and experience, will accomplish it, to be all ready to present to her many patrons and friends.

Every Improvement Known In The Art.  The Improvements and Fixtures of her Room are now fully complete; the Sky-Light one of the best, and so adjusted as to admit all the side light required to remove the heavy shading and give that softness to the tone so remarkable to her pictures.  The Cameras, are second to none in the State, the Chemicals used by her are of her own manufacture and warranted perfectly pure, and her facilities are such that Pictures can be taken in a remarkably short space of time in any weather, and warranted to give satisfaction and to remain indelibly stamped upon the plate for any term of years.

Particular attention paid to taking Children, Groups, and to filling very small Rings and Lockets, and also copying from other Daguerreotypes, Pictures on Oil Paintings, enlarging or diminishing the size.  She will also remove her Apparatus for the purpose of taking pictures of the sick or dead, on reasonable terms.

The Stock Department will also contain a complete assortment, carefully selected.  Fancy and Plain Cases of all styles and sizes, ranging from the lowest to the highest prices, so that all may be suited.

Also, single and family Frames of all styles and sizes.—Plates, Cases, Chemicals, Instruments, and everything pertaining to the art, constantly on hand and for sale at the lowest cash prices.  Careful instruction given in the art.  Apparatus furnished on reasonable terms.

Thankful for former vary liberal patronage, a continuance of the same is respectfully solicited.  Citizens and Strangers are requested to call, and for proof of the above examine specimens, and also refer to the patrons of Mrs. W. D. M’Allaster.

The eighth advertisement ran from December 26, 1855 to January 23, 1856.  Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Photographs And Crystalotypes.  Mrs. McAllaster, having returned from the City would take this method of informing her friends, customers, and the public generally, that she can be found at her Old Stand, opposite the American Hotel where she will be happy to wait on all who may favor her with their patronage.

She has, at Great Expense and trouble, thoroughly versed herself not only in taking Ambrotypes and Daguerreotypes, but also of the variety of Glass and Paper Pictures, such as Crystalotypes, Muygraphs and Photographs and in fact all kinds of Pictures, and her patrons may rest assured that she will keep posted in every improvement in the art.

Particular attention paid to taking Children In Groups, and to filling very small Rings and Lockets; also copying from other Daguerreotypes and oil paintings enlarging or diminishing the size.  She will also remove her Apparatus for the purpose of taking pictures of the Sick or Dead, on reasonable terms.

The Stock Department will also contain a complete assortment, carefully selected.  I would say to artists, call and examine my Stock and Prices before purchasing elsewhere.

The Ninth advertisement ran from January 30 to July 30, 1856.  Ambrotype Patented.  A New Era In Photography.  This beautiful Art, after a long experiment, is at last perfected, and the subscriber, who has the exclusive right to make them in this country, is now enabled to offer to the public A New Style of Picture, far exceeding in beauty and durability anything ever before made.  The exceeding [      ], depth of light and shade, and richness of tone, is wonderful.  They Do Not Reverse The Subject, but present everything in it true position; consequently, Regales, with designs, [letters], figures, &c. Appear Perfectly Natural.

They are without the glare of the Daguerreotype, and hence may be seen in any view.  They will last for ages, unchanged, and possess the rare quality of Imperishability, being hermetically sealed between glass plates, with an indestructible cement which soon hardens, and the two plates become in effect one, with the picture in the centre as durable as glass itself.  This art is particularly adapted to every style of face and complexion and will be found especially favorable to light hair, freckled faces, and light and weak eyes.

The pictures are pronounced by competent judges, to be the greatest achievement in the Photographic Art, having a Relief and Clearness that is truly astonishing.  By this process I am enabled to produce Ambrotypes from the Smallest to Full Size, with all the truth of nature and Permanence of the Finest Plate Glass—the long sought for end in Photographic Portraiture.  The Ambrotype Stereoscope must be seen to be appreciated, the relief being fully as perfect as life.  These pictures offer inducements to those wishing to send them abroad, as they are proof against the action of water, acids, Climate or Atmosphere, and May Be Laid In Water For Months, With Perfect Safety.

Caution!  Pictures not hermetically sealed and stamped patent, and made on single glass, covered with black paint or varnish, are worthless imitations, and it is an imposition on the public to sell them as Ambrotypes.

Citizens and Strangers are invited to call and examine specimens in this art; they are assured of polite attention, and if they wish, A Superior Picture.

Children’s Likenesses by this process are made instantaneously.  Daguerreotypes copied into Ambrotypes and rendered permanent.  Mrs. W. D. McAllaster,  Rooms Directly Opposite the American Hotel.

The tenth advertisement appeared on June 3, 1857.  Attention is invited to the advertisement of House & Benedict, which may be found in this paper.  They are recently from Elmira, where they had established a reputation as first rate artists.  They take all kinds of pictures—Daguerreotypes Ambrotypes, Melanotypes and Cameotypes in superior style.  They have taken the rooms recently occupied by Mrs. McAllaster.

Mrs. W. D. McAllaster is not recorded in other photographic directories.

W. M. Lowry

1857                33 West Washington Street, over pope’s Drug Store, Brookville, Indiana.

W. M. Lowry was recorded in one announcement that appeared on December 25, 1857 in the Indiana American (Brookville, Indiana). Who Would Have Thought That the Excelsior Sky-Light Picture Gallery would have met with such encouraging and unparalleled success? It is even so, from the fact that Lowry always gives the most perfect satisfaction to his customers, by executing Likenesses Superior to any in the city, and just as cheap as the cheapest.

A large, fine, and varied assortment of Frames, Cases. Lockets, Breastpins, &c., &c., on hand at all times.  Instructions given on reasonable terms, and Apparatus and Stock generally furnished at lowest figures.  Bear in mind, if you want a superb Likeness, call on Lowery, No. 33 West Washington Street, over Pop’s Drug Store, second floor.  Examine specimens.  Rooms free.  W. M. Lowry.

W. M. Lowry is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Dr. Lover

1856                Address Unknown, Washington, D. C.

Dr. Lover was recorded in an announcement on September 12, 1856 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C).  Photographs By Gas Light.—Dr. Lover, the well-known artisan, has devised an apparatus for taking photographs by gas light. The main feature being the introduction of a stream of oxygen into the flame of common coal gas which had been previously made to pass through cotton and naptha, with the view of surcharging it with carbon, so as to increase the brilliancy on the admission of the oxygen.

Dr. Lover is not recorded in other photographic directories.