Tag Archives: Mathew B. Brady

Paige & Beach

1848                Concert Hall, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

Paige & Beach (Blanchard P. Paige & Albert Beach) was first recorded in unpublished research A Directory of Nineteenth Century Photographers of Washington, D. C., by Paula Fleming & Laurie Baty.  Paige & Beach proprietors for Plumbe Gallery, Washington, D.C.

They next appeared in an advertisement and article.  The advertisement appeared in the  New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) on July 12, 1848 Henry Clay In His 71St Year.—Published this day, (June 6, 1848.) by E. Anthony, 205 Broadway, a beautiful steel mezzotint engraving of Henry Clay, drawn and engraved from several Daguerreotypes by H. H. Ritchie [Possibly Alexander Hay Ritchie]

This likeness was mainly taken from a fine Daguerreotype now in the possession of the subscriber, executed by Messrs. Paige & Beach, Washington.  The artists is also indebted to Daguerreotypes taken by Messrs. Root, Simons, and W. & F. Langenheim of Philadelphia, and M. B. Brady, M. M. Lawrence and the Plumbe Gallery of New York, to all of whom the subscriber takes this occasion to express his thanks for the liberality with which they placed their valuable pictures at his disposal.

In addition to its merits as an exquisite likeness, this picture stands unrivaled as a work of art.

The title prefixed to this advertisement will distinguish the engraving from any other likeness of Henry Clay published by the subscriber or others.

Price of Proofs on India paper, $1.                                                                                                                      Price of plain paper, 50 cents.                                                                                                                      Price of prints in enameled frames, from $1 upwards.                                                                            For sale by E. Anthony, 205 Broadway.

Daniel Webster.—Also a fine steel engraving of Daniel Webster by Ritchie, from an excellent Daguerreotype by Whipple, of the same size and style with the above.

To any Editor who will give the above advertisement, with this notice, a prominent insertion, a copy of Henry Clay will be forwarded on the receipt of the paper.

The article appeared in the American Telegraph (Washington, D. C.) on July 8, 1851.  A sad case.—about a week ago the records of the Criminal Court should that Albert Beach had been found guilty of obtaining money under false pretenses; and he was yesterday sentenced by Judge Crawford to the Penitentiary for eighteen months.

This man is, we suppose, about thirty-six years old.  He was educated to commercial business in the city of New York, where he afterward held a profitable and responsible position in one of the first establishments.  He subsequently followed the business of daguerreotyping in this city, with apparently very good success; and while so engaged, two or three years ago, married a most estimable and excellent young lady.  To the surprise of many, however, he suddenly sold out his interest in the daguerreotyping establishment, and threw himself out of business for a time; but after a little commenced an auction store, in which his career was brief, as many who had come to know him predicted.  His course was then rapidly downward, and instead of “swelling” at the hotels he turned to lounging at the groggeries; and instead of trying to effect “transactions” at wholesale stores, his aim was simply to “do” some poor fool out of a few dollars.  Caught in one of these tricks, he has at least been sentenced to the felon’s punishment….

The partnership of Paine & Beach is not recorded in published photographic directories.  Paine is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, but Albert Beach is not.

Robert Newell

1857                Address Unknown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                                        1858-1859    926 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.1

Robert Newell was listed in one announcement that appeared on November 7, 1857 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Premiums Awarded at the Twenty ninth Fair of the American Institute…Daguerreotypes, Photographs, Hallotypes, &c.

M. B. Brady, No. 359 Broadway, N. J., for best plain and retouched photographs.………………………………………………………………………………….Small Gold Medal  J. Gurney, No. 349 Broadway, N. Y., for plain and retouched Photographs (a Gold Medal having been before awarded…………………………………………………………..Diploma M. M. Lawrence, No. 381 Broadway, N. Y., for the best Daguerreotypes and Miniatures in Oil …………………………………………………………………………………Large Silver Medal    Meade Brothers, No. 233 Broadway, N. Y., for instantaneous Daguerreotypes.……………………………………………………………………………………….Bronze Medal J. Gurney, No. 349 Broadway, N. Y., for the best life-size Photographs in Oil (a Gold Medal having been before awarded……………………………………………………Diploma              C. D. Fredricks, Nos. 585 and 587 Broadway, N. Y., for life-size Photographs in Oil (a Gold Medal having been before awarded)……………………………………………………Diploma  C. D. Fredericks, Nos. 585 and 587 Broadway, N. Y., for the best Crayon Photographs and Hallotypes………………………………………………………………………Large Silver Medal J. Gurney, No. 349 Broadway, N. Y., for Crayon Photographs and Hallotypes.……………………………………………………………………………………….Bronze Medal J. Gurney, No. 349 Broadway, N. Y., for the best Photographs in Aquerille.…………………………………………………………………………………Small Silver Medal C. D. Fredericks, Nos. 585 and 587 Broadway, N. Y., for Photographs in Aquerille.……………………………………………………………………………………….Bronze Medal S. C. Holmes, No. 289 Broadway, N. Y., for the best Photographic Views.…………………………………………………………………………………Small Silver Medal B. Hafnagel, No. 413 Broadway, N. Y., for photographic Views and copies of Prints.……………………………………………………………………………………….Bronze Medal Phillip E. Bogart & Co., No. 58 Pine street, N. Y., for Photographs by the Solar Camera.…………………………………………………………………………………………….Diploma G. N. Bernard, Syracuse, N. Y., for Photographs on Wood.…………………………………………………………….…………………………Bronze Medal C. C. Harrison, Fifty-third Street, near East River, N. Y., for Photographic Cameras (a Silver Medal having been before awarded……………………………………………………Diploma Robert A. Werner, No. 25 East Broadway, N. Y., for an ingeniously planned Diaphragm.……………………………………………………………………………………………..DiplomaA. Beckers, No. 411 Broadway, N. Y., for a Stereoscopic Panorama.……………………………………………………………………………………………..DiplomaR. Newell & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., for three delicately tinted Portraits.……………………………………………………………………………………………..Diploma J. Gurney, No. 349 Broadway, N. Y., for the best Photographs in Pastel.……………………………………………………………………………………….Bronze Medal C. D. Fredricks, Nos. 585 and 587 Broadway, N. Y., for Photographs in Pastel.……………………………………………………………………………………………..Diploma

Robert Newell is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Philadelphia in 1858-1860.

 

George P. Morse

1859                691 Broadway, New York, New York.

George P. Morse was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on September 9, 1859 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photograph Gallery For Sale—Large, And well located; only up one flight of stairs; five year lease, with or with out specimens and apparatus; is between Brady and Gurney’s, 691 Broadway.  A fine locality for bon ton business.  Inquire of George P. Morse, on the premises.[1]

George P. Morse is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as George D. Morse in 1860 at 691 Broadway.  This is the same address as Silas A. Holmes.

[1] 691 Broadway is Silas A. Holmes address, he also uses the term “bon ton” in his advertisements.

Johnson & Gurney

1852                Rooms at the Odd-Fellows’ Building, Franklin, Louisiana.

Johnson & Gurney were recorded in three announcements and one advertisement in The Planters’ Banner (Franklin, Louisiana).  The first announcement appeared on April 3, 1852. Messrs. Johnson and Gurney daguerreotypist, have taken rooms at the Odd-Fellows’ building, for the purpose of “practicing the daguerrean art in all its minutiae.”  The specimens of their work, which may be seen at the entrance to their rooms, are highly finished and beautiful.  See their card in another column.

The advertisement ran from April 3 to 24, 1852.  Mr. Johnson, The Oldest Daguerreotypist now living, and Mr. Gurney, of the firm Gibbs & Gurney, of Vicksburg and Natchez, Miss., have opened a room in the Odd-Fellows’ Hall, at Franklin, where they will remain a short time, for the purpose of practicing the Daguerrean Art in all its minutiae.

Mr. Johnson is a pioneer in the business, has practiced the Art ever since its introduction into the United States, and is acknowledged by Root, Brady, Plumb and Hill, of New York, and Jacobs, Maguire and Moissenett, of New Orleans, to be the best artist now living in America, as almost all of the above artist have received their instructions direct from him.

We have a beautiful variety of Cases and Lockets of all descriptions, namely—Parodi Cases, Kossuth Cases, Jenny Lind Cases, Catharine Hayes, Eareka Cases, Bridal Cases, Breast Pins, &c.   The Citizens of Franklin and its Vicinity are invited to call and examine our specimens.  Perfect satisfaction given, or no charge made.  N. B.—A rare chance is now offered for obtaining instructions in this beautiful Art, direct from Mr. Johnson.   Charles E. Johnson.  M. J. Gurney.

The second announcement appeared on April 10, 1852.  Messrs. Johnson & Gurney Daguerreotypist, are making admirable pictures at their rooms, in the Odd Fellows’ building.

The third announcement appeared on April 17, 1852.  Messrs. Johnson & Gurney Daguerreotypist, will only remain at their rooms in the Odd Fellows’ building a few days longer.  Those needing pictures had better make an early call.

Johnson & Gurney (Charles E. Johnson & M. J. Gurney) are not recorded as being partners in other photographic directories.  Both are recorded in separately.

DeWitt C. Grenell

N. D.               5½ Tremont Row, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                                            N. D.               205 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                                      N. D.               100 Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                                                        N. D.               Eighth and Chestnut, Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                            N. D.               205 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.                                                                      1849                Rooms in Safford’s New Block, Watertown, New York.                                              1850                236 Grand Street, New York, New York.                                                          1851                557 & 559 Broadway, New York, New York.

DeWitt C. Grenell was recorded in three advertisements.  The first advertisement ran on October 17 to November 14, 1849 in the Northern New York Journal (Watertown, New York).  Daguerreotype, Plumbotype, and Calotype Pictures, “Secure the Shadow ere the Substance Fades.”  DeWitt C. Grenell, Daguerrean Artist, just arrived from New York and Philadelphia, with the largest assortment of Daguerreotype Stock, Apparatus and Specimens, ever exhibited in Watertown.  Having had many years experience in the largest establishments in the United States, viz: Southworth & Hawes, Boston, M. B. Brady, N. York, T. P. & D. C. Collins, McLees & German sic. McCless & Germon Philadelphia, also Plumbe’s National Daguerrean Gallery, Baltimore.  He has taken and furnished in the best manner three large and commodious rooms in Safford’s New Block, opposite the American Hotel.  Having a thorough knowledge of all the late improvements in the art, and a superior Apparatus, he feels confident his portraits will excel anything before offered.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens , among which are several distinguished personages.  Photographs neatly set in Lockets, Pins and Rings.  Family Groups of any desired size, also Children taken instantly.

Daguerreotype Stock constantly on hand at the lowest New York Prices.  Goods will be forwarded to Operators in the country on the shortest notice.  Also, instructions given to any person desiring to learn the mysteries of the art.  Watertown, Sept. 26th, 1849.

The Second advertisement ran on June 8 & 10, 1851 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country.  The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none.  The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

The third advertisement ran on June 9 & 10, 1851 in the New York Daily Tribune.  (New York, New York.)  June 9, 1851, Vol. XI, No. 3165, P. 4.

D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country. The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none. The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

DeWitt C. Grenell is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in 1850 to 1851 in New York City.

Brady & Evans

1857                205 & [359] Broadway, New York, New York.

Brady & Evans.  In trying to piece information together about the partnership I started looking in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry unfortunately the partnership is not mention.  Under the entry for Mathew B. Brady’s there is no mention of Evans, under the entry for Thomas C. Evans John does mention that he probably worked for Brady in the 1850’s, but does not list hard dates for when they might have been active together.  Contrary to John reporting Brady did operate the 205 Broadway address from 1847 until 1858, and the 359 Broadway address from 1853 to 1859, a third New York City Gallery was added in 1858-1859 at 643 Broadway.  John reports in 1858-1859 that Evans is at the 643 Broadway address but does not make the connection that it is the same address as Brady’s.  Since only the two notices below have been found to date that mention Thomas C. Evans it would only be speculation to suggest that Evans was working at the 205 Address, but, knowing that he is working at the new studio and that the 205 address has been closed gives some weight to that suggestion.

The first notice about Brady and Evans were reported in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.) on October 2, 1857 Life-size Photographs.—The art of Photography is advancing rapidly and steadily towards perfection.  The imperial photograph has been generally deemed the finest achievement in the department thus far; but Messrs. Brady & Evans have gone a step further, and have produced full-length photographic portraits the size of life.  These are the first of the kind ever made in the world, and are well worthy of examination, not simply as curiosities, but as works of art.  Two of them are groups of three figures each, and the other is a splendid full-length likeness of the popular prima donna Frezzolini.  The pictures are in size about seven feet by four, and are as accurate likenesses as any of the smaller photographs in the gallery.  By some means or other, moreover, the artists have overcome the leading defect of this art, which consists in exaggerating the size of that portion of the object which happens to be in the foreground.  These pictures are not taken directly from life, but from smaller ones upon glass, magnified.  We understand two of them will probably be sent to the Crystal Palace for exhibition.  They are certainly very remarkable productions.—New York Times.

The second notice appeared in The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana) on October 3, Brady & Evans of New York City are producing photographic portraits of full life size, but are first taken in miniature and then enlarged.