Tag Archives: Baltimore Maryland

M. Turner

1858                213 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.

M. Turner was recorded in one announcement in The Daily Exchange (Baltimore, Maryland) on July 28, 1858.  Sad Case Of Drowning.—On Monday evening last, about 6 o’clock, Mr. M. Turner, a well-known photographic artist of this city, was drowned in the Patapsco river, a short distance below Fort McHenry.  He had been down the river with a number of friends upon a fishing excursion, and whilst on their way back he got into a skiff attached to the sail boat in which the remainder of the party were.  While drawing the skiff up to the sail boat by means of the rope by which it was attached, a sudden surge of the skiff caused him to lose his balance and fall overboard.  One of those on the boat immediately plunged into the stream to give him aid, but the unfortunate man did not rise to the surface, from some unexplained cause, after first sinking, and his companions were compelled to return home without securing the body.  He was aged about fifty-five years, and leaves a wife and several children to morn his untimely end.

M. Turner is listed in other photographic directories with the question, being, was he a photographer the above announcement answers that in the affirmative.   

D. R. Stiltz

N. D.               Address Unknown, Baltimore, Maryland.

1854                Over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pennsylvania Avenue, between 6th and 7th Streets, Washington, District of Columbia.

1856                159 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

1858                82 South Sharp, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

1859                244 Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

D. R. Stiltz was recorded in nine advertisements in the Daily Evening Star (Washington, D. C.). The first advertisement appeared in June 14, 1854.  Wake Up, Washingtonians!  For Now Is The Time To Get Splendid Daguerreotypes for only 25 Cent, and taken at no other place than J. J. Woodbridge’s New York Picture Gallery, under the control of Prof. Stiltz, late of Whitehurst’s Baltimore Gallery, and one who will give every satisfaction.  Beautiful electorene pictures are also taken at the same place over Gilman’s Drug Store, Pa. av., between 6th and 7th streets.

The second advertisement appeared on June 20, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  Since Professor Stiltz has taken charge of the New York Daguerrean Gallery, over Gilman’s Drug Store, things go on finely; every picture is a perfect gem, and the rooms are crowded daily, for those beautiful electorene pictures, taken by the new French process.  Every picture warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  Now is your chance. J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.

The third ad appeared on June 24, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  We ever continue to please our very numerous friends and acquaintances with perfect likenesses for only 25 cents, taken by the new French process, by which we are enabled to take from three to four hundred pictures daily.  If our friends call at J. J. Woodbridge’s, Pa. av., betw. 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, we will assure perfect satisfaction.  D. R. Stiltz,  J. J. Woodbridge, Prop’r.

The fourth ad appeared on June 27, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The friends and acquaintances of J. J. Woodbridge had better take advantage of this fine weather, and call to have a picture taken by the world renowned new French method, by which we can take a perfect resemblance in this space of ten minutes. D. R. Stiltz.  J. J. Woodbridge, Proprietor.  

The fifth ad appeared on June 29, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great Electorene Daguerrean Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, a French operator just from Paris, and between Prof. Stewart and Stiltz we will guarantee to give every one satisfaction, at the old stand.  J. J. Woodbridge, Pa. avenue, between 6th and 7th sts., over Gilman’s Drug Store.

The sixth ad appeared on July 1, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The New York Picture Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking the Electorene Pictures by the new French process, and by it we can take your picture in a few seconds, while you can sit in one of the coolest rooms in the rooms in the city until it is finished.  Profs Stewart and Stiltz guarantees to suit all who may give us a call.  We can take 400 on the 4th of July.  The only place where you can get them is on Pennsylvania avenue, between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of Prof. Woodbridge.

The seventh advertisement appeared on July 8, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  Young America In Its Full Bloom.—Profs. Stewart and Stiltz are still taking those beautiful Electorine Daguerreotypes by the new French process.  Come one, come all, we guarantee to suite those who may give us a call, on Pennsylvania avenue, between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store.

We have two rooms to rent on the second floor, at the old gallery of Prof. J. J. Woodbridge.          

The eighth ad appeared on July 10, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great New York Picture Gallery has fallen into the hands of Prof. Stewart, who is taking those beautiful Electorine Pictures by the new French process.  I have in my employ Prof.  Stiltz, who is not only one of the best operators in the United States, who for a long time been operating in one of the finest Gallery’s in Baltimore for Prof. Woodbridge.   My Gallery is on Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge.                          

The ninth ad appeared on July 15, 1854.  25 Cent Daguerreotypes.  The Great New York Picture Gallery is flourishing rapidly.  After the departure of Hayer, it has fallen into the hands of Prof Stewart, who is taking those beautiful pictures by the new French process.  I have in my employ Prof.  Stiltz, who is not only one of the best daguerrean artist in the United States but in the world, and we guaranteed to suit all who may favor us with a call in Pennsylvania avenue between 6th and 7th streets, over Gilman’s Drug Store, at the old stand of J. J. Woodbridge.              

D. R. Stiltz is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, Maryland from 1856 to 1859.Ross Kelbaugh in Directory Of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900 list Stiltz in Baltimore until 1864 and in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1875.


[1] Directory Of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900.

Eldridge Stanton

1856-1857       Pratt’s Block, over Kerr’s Hardware Store, Chatham, Ontario, Canada.[1]

1859                Address Unknown, Moundsville, Virginia.

1859                Address Unknown, Barnesville, Ohio. (?)

1859                Rooms at the Monroe House, Woodsfield, Ohio.

1859                Rooms at Davis’ Hotel, Woodsfield, Ohio.

Eldridge Stanton was recorded in five announcements and one advertisement in The Spirit of Democracy (Woodsfield, Ohio).  The first announcement appeared on May 18, 1859.  We are informed that all the handsome ladies about town intend to have their ambrotypes taken by Mr. Stanton.—Pretty much everybody else intends to do the same thing.  His terms are cheaper, and his pictures better, if we may judge from his reputation, than those of any of his predecessors in this place.

The advertisement ran from May 18 to July 13, 1859.  Mr. Stanton Is Taking Pictures For Fifty Cents, At The Monroe House Woodsfield Ohio.

The second announcement appeared on May 18, 1859.  Mr. E. Stanton, Photographer.  This gentleman, who has been here for some time, engaged in taking pictures for our citizens took his departure yesterday, bound for Barnesville, Belmont co., Ohio, where he will remain a few weeks before his departure for Canada, his place of residence.  While here he made many warm friends, and we were sorry to give him the parting hand, as we found him to be a worthy friend and fellow, and passed many a pleasant evening with him.  We commend him to those among he may chance to sojourn for a time—not only as a gentleman, but as an artist of the first water.  He has been a practical chemist for many years, and was the first to introduce the photograph (paper picture) into Western Virginia.  We can attest the fact of his skill as an artist from having the most life-like picture of ourselves taken by him, that we ever had taken in our life, although we have tried many artist.  He knows the use of the camera thoroughly.—Moundsville Sentinel.

The third announce appeared on May 25, 1859.  War!  War!  Before you start for the seat of War, give Mr. Stanton a call at Davis’ Hotel, and get your likeness taken to leave with your friends.

The fourth announcement appeared on July 6, 1859.  Interesting To All.—Mr. Stanton will be absent from town till Thursday the 7th Inst., when he will return and close up operating here by the 14th.  His success heretofore is sufficient evidence of his skill, we would advise all desiring those excellent Melainotypes, to give him an early call as the last day will undoubtedly be crowded.

The fifth announcement appeared on July 20, 1859.  Going to Remain.  Mr. Stanton had determined to depart from here on Friday, but such has been the rush of business at his rooms that he has concluded to remain until after court.  He is doing more than double the amount of business that any artist has done before him.  He makes the best pictures, by one half, and the cheapest by seventy-five per cent, that have ever been taken in this place.  That’s so.

Eldridge Stanton is not recorded in other photographic directories during the daguerrean period.  Born in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada on March 7, 1835, died Toronto in 1912.  Stanton was active in Baltimore, Maryland from 1867-1870, and in Detroit, Michigan in 1870.[1]


[1] A Biographical Index of Daguerreotypists in Canada 1839-1871 by Graham W. Garrett.

William S. Shaw


1859                188 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

William S. Shaw was recorded in one advertisement that ran on December 29 & 30, 1859 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Duke’s Southern Photographic Temple Of Art, 188 Main st., cor. Above the Post-Office. Plain Photographs executed for $1 only; Duplicates $9 per doz.  Ivorytypes $10 and up.  Photographs in Indian Ink, pastel, Water Colors, and Oil, from miniatures to life size, on the most reasonable terms.

Mr. Wm. S. Shaw, late of London, who had the honor of being selected by the Protestant Episcopal Missionary Board to photograph the Bishops, Clerical and Lay Delegates of the Episcopal Church of America that met here in convention in October, Is now engaged at the Southern Photographic Temple of Art, and the public may rest assured they will be supplied with first class work in all branches of the art, equal to that of any other establishment in the Union—as Mr. Shaw is well known , and acknowledged one of the first photographers of this Country. Advertisement ran on December 29 & 30, 1859.

William S. Shaw is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, Maryland in 1858, and 1858-59, and possibly in Richmond, Virginia in 1860.  

Ross J. Kelbaugh  records in Directory Of Maryland Photographers1839-1900, two listings.  The first entry “Shaw” is from The Photographic And Fine Arts Journal. November 1857, page 331.  Friend Snelling, — I promised to give you a full account of the Exhibition of Photographs and Ambrotypes, at the Maryland Institute Fair this year. Well there is plenty of material to go upon. First, Mr. P. L. Perkins has a grand display, better than last year, and the arrangement of his pictures are more tasteful.  He has life sized photographs painted in oil, some eight or ten; cabinet pictures also.  Mr. Shaw who has been operating at. this establishment, is a good workman and fully understands his business…

The second entry is “Shaw, W., photographer” S. Holliday near Fayette (1858-1859). 

Are they the same person I don’t know, more research is needed to make that determination.

Charles W. Purcell

1849-1850       128 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]                                                        1851                   Rooms in Sharpe & Yandee’s Building, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Charles W. Purcell was mentioned in an announcement that appeared on October 9, 1851 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  “Here Life Seems Speaking From A Hundred Frames.”—The new and beautiful Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. S. Rea are completed, and are now open for the reception of visitors.  The quality of Mr. Rea’s pictures has always been greatly admired, but since he has introduced the improvement of his new sky-light, and side-lights, he is enabled to give a much better finish to Daguerreotypes, and to produce a more perfect picture than heretofore.  By his new arrangement of light, the difficulty heretofore experienced in taking the likenesses of children, aged persons, and those with light-colored or weak eyes, has been removed, and an impression is taken on the plate in a very short space of time.  We have seen several of his pictures taken by the new light, and for beautiful gradation of light and shade, clearness in the image, and the softness of tone, we have never seen them equaled.

The Metropolitan Gallery consists of two large rooms, in Sharpe & Yandee’s building.  One is used for operating, and the other as the gallery and reception room.  The latter is tastefully and splendidly furnished, the pictures being arranged on each side of the room, and also in the frame-work of a circular moveable case, placed on a pedestal in the centre of the room.  His beautiful assortment of fine gold lockets and breastpins for miniatures, occupy a portion of this case.

Mr. Rea has secured the services of Mr. Charles W. Purcell, of Baltimore, an experienced operator, and he pledges himself that not a picture shall leave his establishment that does not give entire satisfaction.

Charles W. Purcell is recorded in other photographic directories but the above information helps to clarify his timeline.

[1] Baltimore activity dates and address from Directory of Maryland Photographers 1939-1900, p. 43.  By Ross J. Kelbaugh..

William King & Brother

1859                2 North Liberty Street, Baltimore, Maryland.

William King & Brother were recorded in an advertisement that ran from December 6 to 31, 1859 in The Daily Exchange (Baltimore, Maryland).  Christmas!  Christmas!!  Christmas!!!  Presents For The Holidays.  Stereoscopic Views of the most noted scenery, places, buildings, monuments, statuary, &c., of this and foreign countries, together with descriptive, sentimental and comic figures and groups, as true as nature, one of the most pleasing and instructive presents for the season.

Also, a fine selection of Photographs and plain and colored prints.  Wm. King & Bro., Artist and Photographer’s Depot, No. 2 N. Liberty Street.

William King & Brother are not listed in Directory of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900 by Ross J. Kelbaugh until 1863.  Possibly William H., King, Jr. and Alfred H King active in New York city 1849-1857.

Kerfoot & King

1845                Rooms 197½ & 218 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.                        1845                Rooms 163 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.

Kerfoot & King (B. F. King) were recorded in an advertisement and an announcement in the American Republican and Baltimore Daily Clipper (Baltimore, Maryland).  The advertisement ran from February 5 to September 17, 1845.  Photographic Likenesses.  Taken on an improved principle by Kerfoot & King.  A favorable opportunity is now offered to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Baltimore, to obtain Miniature Portraits in the most perfect style of execution, which for life-like beauty, distinctness and accuracy, are acknowledged to be unsurpassed.  Children taken at all ages, in from four to ten seconds.  Adults in from fifteen seconds to one minute.  Families taken in groups; also invalids and deceased persons taken at their residence on the shortest notice.  Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather and satisfaction guaranteed in all cases.  Original Paintings are likewise correctly copied.

Rooms 197½ and 218 south side of Baltimore Street between Charles and Light streets, where persons are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens and judge for themselves.  Miniatures colored in the most beautiful manner.

The announcement appeared on April 29, 1845.  City Intelligence…Mr. Editor, Knowing you to be a gentleman of particular observation and a lover of the fine arts, and also that your calling leads you to observe and note what combines novelty, interest and merit, the pure test of the march of improvement and discovery, I will not presume, that, in your peregrination over the surface of our fair city, you have failed to notice the attractive show of Daguerrean likenesses, taken by the Messrs. King & Kerfoot, at their gallery of paintings, no. 163 Baltimore St.  Any one, having a leisure moment, would be ample repaid for even a passing glance at their numerous specimens: for I take it upon me to say, that Plumbe, or Anthony and Edwards, though they be masters of this art, are unable more perfectly “to hold the mirror up to Nature:” nor do I believe, that the general outline and features of the face can be more vividly and truthfully portrayed.  But these gentlemen have silenced the only remaining doubt as to the rank they are destined to occupy among the description of artists: for they have taken, as any one may see at the foot of the stairs, the identical “Only a few more left”—the genuine razor-strop man—basket, strops, and his speaking card.  Look and see if it can  be beaten.   A Visitor.

Kerfoot is not recorded in other photographic directories.  B. F. King is recorded, but the partnership and the 1845 date is new information.

Johnson

1847    Address Unknown, Baltimore, Maryland.

Reported in an announcement on  October 14, 1847 in the McGrawville Express (McGrawville, New York).  Deaths In Mexico.—We have before us, this morning, accounts of four isolated deaths in Mexico, three by wounds received in battle, and one by assassination.  The three who died from their wounds, were Lieut. Twiggs, of Virginia and Lieut. Murry Winder, of Maryland, both wounded in the attack on Major  Lally’s command, and Lieut. McElvin, of Ohio, who was wounded in a fight near Santa Fe.  The fourth was an unfortunate Daguerreotype artist from Baltimore, named Johnson, who went out alone with a rifle, near Cerro Gordo, and, falling in with a party of guerillas, was killed by them.—N. Y. Com. Adv.

Reported in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, Maryland in June of 1847.

Hape & Kuhn

1856                Rooms at the Odd Fellows’ Hall, Charles Town, Virginia.                                                1856-1857     Over 207½ West Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]

Hape & Kuhn (Samuel & Frank) were recorded in an advertisement that ran from September 6 to 20, 1856 in the Spirit of Jefferson (Charles Town, Virginia).  Ambrotypes! Or Imperishable Pictures On Glass.  Hape & Kuhn, Ambrotypist Artist of Baltimore, would respectfully announce to the citizens of Charlestown, that they have taken rooms at the Odd Fellows’ Hall, where they are prepared to furnish in the highest style of the art, the now popular and incomparable Ambrotype.

These pictures are made on plate glass and protected by a coating of varnish on both sides, rendering them impervious to the action of water or acids of any kind.  They do not reverse the subject, but represent everything in its true position; and being without the glare of the Daguerreotype, may be seen in any light.  The Ambrotype possesses many beauties not discernable in the Daguerreotype.  Call and examine specimens and see for yourselves.

Hape & Kuhn are recorded in both Directory of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900 and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, but not in Virginia.

[1] Directory Of Maryland Photographers 1839-1900 by Ross J. Kelbaugh.

DeWitt C. Grenell

N. D.               5½ Tremont Row, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                                            N. D.               205 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                                      N. D.               100 Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                                                        N. D.               Eighth and Chestnut, Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                            N. D.               205 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.                                                                      1849                Rooms in Safford’s New Block, Watertown, New York.                                              1850                236 Grand Street, New York, New York.                                                          1851                557 & 559 Broadway, New York, New York.

DeWitt C. Grenell was recorded in three advertisements.  The first advertisement ran on October 17 to November 14, 1849 in the Northern New York Journal (Watertown, New York).  Daguerreotype, Plumbotype, and Calotype Pictures, “Secure the Shadow ere the Substance Fades.”  DeWitt C. Grenell, Daguerrean Artist, just arrived from New York and Philadelphia, with the largest assortment of Daguerreotype Stock, Apparatus and Specimens, ever exhibited in Watertown.  Having had many years experience in the largest establishments in the United States, viz: Southworth & Hawes, Boston, M. B. Brady, N. York, T. P. & D. C. Collins, McLees & German sic. McCless & Germon Philadelphia, also Plumbe’s National Daguerrean Gallery, Baltimore.  He has taken and furnished in the best manner three large and commodious rooms in Safford’s New Block, opposite the American Hotel.  Having a thorough knowledge of all the late improvements in the art, and a superior Apparatus, he feels confident his portraits will excel anything before offered.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens , among which are several distinguished personages.  Photographs neatly set in Lockets, Pins and Rings.  Family Groups of any desired size, also Children taken instantly.

Daguerreotype Stock constantly on hand at the lowest New York Prices.  Goods will be forwarded to Operators in the country on the shortest notice.  Also, instructions given to any person desiring to learn the mysteries of the art.  Watertown, Sept. 26th, 1849.

The Second advertisement ran on June 8 & 10, 1851 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country.  The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none.  The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

The third advertisement ran on June 9 & 10, 1851 in the New York Daily Tribune.  (New York, New York.)  June 9, 1851, Vol. XI, No. 3165, P. 4.

D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country. The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none. The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

DeWitt C. Grenell is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in 1850 to 1851 in New York City.