Tag Archives: New York City

E. L. Walker

1856                205 or 359 Broadway, New York, New York.

1856                585 Broadway, New York, New York.

E. L. Walker was mentioned in three advertisements.  The first appeared in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) on December 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes And Melainotypes.—The most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker (formerly of Brady’s Gallery), now at the magnificent Gallery of C. D. Fredericks, Photographist, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The second advertisement appeared on December 12, 1856 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Ambrotypes And Melainotypes.—The Most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker, formerly of Brady’s gallery, now at the magnificent gallery of C. D. Fredricks, Photographist, 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The third advertisement appeared on December 23,1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Ambrotypes and Melainotypes.—The most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker (formerly of Brady’s Gallery), now at the magnificent Gallery of C. D. Fredericks, Photographist, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Photographs.—Penabert of Paris, Photographist.  Finished in oil, aquarelle, and pastel, by the talented and inimitable corps of Parisian artists, introduced to this country by C. D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Presents For The Holidays.—There is nothing so acceptable for a Holiday present as a beautiful Photograph, Daguerreotype, or Ambrotype, which should be secured as early as possible at Fredericks Magnificent Gallery, No. 585 Broadway, opposite the Metropolitan Hotel.

Advertisement ran on December 23 & 26, 1856.

E. L. Walker is not recorded in other photographic directories.  He was also not listed in the New York City Directories for the years 1855/1856; 1856/1857; 1857/1858.

Von Sneidenburgh

1855                289 Broadway, New York, New York.

Von Sneidenburgh was recorded in one advertisement on May 3, 1855 in The New York Herald  (New York, New York).  New York Picture Company.—Daguerreotypes, 25 and 50 cents; photographs, $1 to $5.—A club of twenty artists employed taking 600 daily, by a principle of economy, system, and speed.  Professors O’Neil and Von Sneidenburgh, of Ireland and Germany, engaged by this company, 289 Broadway.

Von Sneidenburgh is not recorded in other photographic directories.  The 289 Broadway address is Silas A. Holmes gallery, he has been known to advertise that he employs twenty to twenty-five artist, and that he takes hundreds of images daily.

Voigtlander

1849                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

Voigtlander appeared in one announcement on May 21, 1849 in the New York Daily Tribune  (New York, New York).  Voigtlander’s Magic Views.—A large and really brilliant audience, containing some three hundred ladies and children, visited the exhibition of these splendid views on Saturday evening, and were enthusiastic in the expression of their delight. The changes of one picture into another, and the life-like truth and breath of atmospheric effects of these views cannot be believed until they are seen.  The superb series of Astronomical Views, Chromatropes, Kaleidscope, &c. &c. are gorgeous and beautiful in the extreme. 

Voigtlander is not recorded in other photographic directories.  It is unknown if Voiglander was a daguerreotypist, but the similarities with John Adams Whipple in Boston and his magic lantern show will need further examination.

A. P. Vlasto

1856                423 Broadway, New York, New York.

A. P. Vlasto was recorded in one advertisement and one announcement.  The advertisement appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on March 30, 1856.  Vlasto’s Photograph, Ambrotype and Daguerreotype gallery, 423 Broadway, three doors above Canal street.—Pictures of the finest class taken in every style.  Prices moderate.  The public are respectfully invited to examine the specimens of superior photographs, &c.  A. P. Vlasto.

The announcement appeared on June 26, 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  An Artist Taking Poison.—Mr. A. P. Vlasto, a daguerreian artist doing business at No. 423 Broadway, was on Wednesday morning found lying on the floor of his gallery, insensible and quite stupid, as supposed from the effects of a dose of poison which, doubtless, he had purchased and taken the evening previous.  When the discovery was made, a physician was called in at once and applied the usual remedies in such cases, but there are scarcely any hopes of recovery.  The cause which induced Mr. Vlasto to take the poison was not ascertained; but if death ensues further particulars respecting the matter will be learned.  He it is said, had no pecuniary embarrassments.

A.P. Vlasto is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Van Loan & Chase

1846-1847       Pennsylvania Avenue, next door to the U. S. Hotel, Washington, D. C.

Van Loan & Chase were recorded in two Advertisements and four announcements, one advertisement and two announcements in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) and one advertisement and two announcements in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  The first advertisement ran from December 19, 1846 to February 8, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance free.  Next door to the United States Hotel.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m., till 5 o’clock, p. m.               

The first announcement appeared in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) on December 31, 1846.  We would call the attention of citizens and strangers to the daguerreotype establishment of Messrs. Van Loan & Chase, next door to the United States Hotel.

The second advertisement ran from April 30 to June 1, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance Fee—next door to the U. S. Hotel.

Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m. till 5 o’clock p. m.. Washington, 1847.  april 14.

The second announcement appeared on May 26, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  A Chinese Painting.  To the Editor of the Union.  Sir:  I request a small space in your valuable paper whilst I employ it in inviting the attention of the regular artists, the amateur, and the curious, to the inspection of an extraordinary and beautifully executed painting—the genuine production of a Chinaman by the name of Sunqua.  The picture, five feet in length and two-and-a-half in breadth, may be seen at the Daguerreotype rooms of Mr. Van Loan, next door to the United States Hotel, Washington City. This picture represents the town of Canton in the Celestial Empire….

The third announcement appeared on June 9, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.) Washington As It Is.  June, 1847, Pennsylvania Avenue.  No. II.

Crossing Third street, westwardly, westwardly, on the North side of Pennsylvania avenue…Next Door westward of the United States Hotel is a spacious and lofty building belonging to John Donoho, at present partly occupied by Van Loan & Chase’s admirable Daguerrean rooms.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 28, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  We are indebted to Messrs. Brooke, Shillington, & Co., of this city, for a “View of the Battle of Buena Vista,” published by H. R. Robinson….We are also presented with a fine lithographic portrait of Col. Charles May, from a daguerreotype of Van Loan & Co., of this city.  This is also published by Mr. Robinson of New York….

Van Loan & Chase are not recorded in other photographic directories.  While their first names are not recorded in the announcements or advertisements other photographic directories may shed light into who they may be.  The advertisement reads “Van Loan & Chase, From New York & Philadelphia.”  Based on the order in the advertisement Van Loan would be from New York and Chase from Philadelphia.  To date the only Van Loan working in New York City would be Matthew D. Van Loan while Samuel Van Loan is active in Philadelphia, there is no record of him being active in New York.  Further research on a genealogy site revealed the following.  He was reared in [Catskill, N. Y.] and educated in the common schools. In 1841 he went to New York City and opened a daguerreotype studio, being the first man in the United States to make a business of producing portraits by the new process. He continued taking pictures for ten years in New York, and from there went to Philadelphia and later to Washington, engaging in the same business. Subsequently and up to the time of his death, in 1856, he was employed in the custom-house in San Francisco.   While Chase is a common name, it is possibly he is Theodore L. Chase who was active in Philadelphia in 1846-1847. 

Mr. Tucker

1855                262 Ninth street, three doors from First Avenue, New York, New York.

Mr. Tucker was recorded in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 20, 1855.  An Immense Business For $100.—A Young Man with the above amount, will be taken as an equal partner by an ambrotypist artist, who intends travelling and wants assistance.  This is a new art that will supersede daguerreotyping.  Immense profits can be realized, as there is scarcely any opposition.  Call or address a note to Mr. Tucker, 262 Ninth street, three doors from First avenue.

Mr. Tucker is not recorded in other photographic directories without more information.

J. F. Tracy

1845                233 Broadway, opposite the Park fountain, New York, New York.

J. F. Tracy was recorded in one announcement and two advertisements.  The announcement appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on April 14, 1845.  The daguerreotype—We had thought that the perfection of this art had been attained, but we find there are still improvements.  Among those we have seen recently were some specimens at Mr. Tracy’s rooms, No. 233 Broadway.  He has taken some portraits which, for life-like beauty and effect, cannot be excelled.  He has, likewise, engaged the services of Mr. Burgess, who formerly occupied rooms at the corner of John and Broadway, and those who wish a picture in his style, which is acknowledged to be superior, will please call soon, as Mr. B. leaves the city in a few days.

The first advertisement ran from April 14 to May 27, 1845 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Daguerreotype Portraits.  J. F. Tracy has taken Rooms at No. 233 Broadway, up stairs, second floor, where he is executing some of the most beautiful specimens of the Daguerrian Art in this city.  The prices are according to the style and finish, from One To Three Dollars.

Those in want of perfect Pictures are requested to call and examine his specimens.  Mr. T. is happy to announce that he has engaged the professional services of N. G. Bingers [sic.], for a short time, and those who wish Pictures in his peculiar beautiful style would do well to call soon.

Plates, Cases, Chemicals, &c., always on hand, and instructions given in the Art on moderate terms.                                                                                                            

The second advertisement appeared on June 13, 1845 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Tracy’s Daguerrean Rooms, 233 Broadway, opposite the Park Fountain.  Portraits from $1 to $5, including case—correct Likenesses, and no other delivered.  Instructions in the art—Plates, Chemicals, &c., &c.

J. F. Tracy does not recorded in other photographic directories.  Nathan G. Burgess association with Tracy was previously unknown.

Benjamin C. Townsend

1843                42 Beaver Street, New York, New York.

Benjamin C. Townsend of the partnership of Welton & Townsend Joseph C. Welton & Benjamin C. Townsend)[1] were recorded in one advertisement that ran from April 20 to 26, 1843 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Daguerreotype Plates.  “Scovills” first quality plates, pronounced by the first operators in this country, to be superior to any imported plates, for sale by their agents, Welton & Townsend, 42 Beaver street. 

Benjamin C. Townsend is not recorded in other photographic directories.  According to the 1842/1843 New York City directory their occupation was buttons at 42 Beaver Street, the following directory 1843/1844 their occupation was still listed as buttons but they had moved to 5 William. 


[1] 1842/1843 & 1843/1844 New York City Directory.

Mrs. Townsend

1843                235 West 19th Street, Near 9th Avenue, New York, New York.

Mrs. Townsend was recorded in one advertisement that ran from March 14 to 16, 1843 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Daguerrian Miniatures Of every sizes—copies of Pictures, Statues, Bust, &c., &c. (in all weather) by Mrs. Townsend, No. 235 West 19th street, near 9th avenue.

N. B.  Perfect likenesses may be had for breastpins, Lockets, Bracelets, Rings, &c.

Mrs. Townsend is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Thompson

1856                313 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]

Thompson was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on  January 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Thompson, 313 Broadway — This gallery I believe is pretty well known. There is little fault to be found with the pictures, they are sharp, well-developed and clear, three great requisites. The ambrotypes are as good as can be expected from the newness of the process. On the whole I think the public in general will listen to the name of Thompson with different feelings than Mr. Toodle.

Thompson is not listed in other photographic directories.  This is probably Josiah W. Thompson who is listed in 1856 as being at 315 Broadway. 


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.