Tag Archives: New York City

George Penabert

1856-1857       168 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]                                            1856-1857       585 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                                1857                   587 Broadway, New York, New York.

George Penabert is recorded in one article and six advertisements.  The article appeared on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  Fredericks, Penabert & Germon, Chestnut St.—The distinguishing feature of this gallery is its oil colored photographs, which are only equaled by some I have seen in Brady’s gallery New York. The positive photographs show much artistic skill, and are notable for great depth of tone, softness of contour, and for even balance of light and shade. The rooms are very prettily furnished, and their appearance very effective.

The first advertisement appeared on August 26 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).   The Copartnership heretofore existing between Messrs. Gurney & Fredericks having been dissolved by mutual consent.  Mr. Charles D. Fredericks would respectfully announce to his former patrons and friends that he has removed the Photographic department, of which he was the introducer in this country, to his new, large and elegant rooms, at No. 585 Broadway, opposite the Metropolitan Hotel.  The several European artists, which Mr. Fredericks introduced from his Parisian establishment, will continue to assist him in the various styles of coloring, viz: Oil, Paste and Water.  Those who have examined their productions acknowledge them to be superior to those of any other artist in this country.  The advantage which the undersigned has by his connection with his Paris establishment, will enable him to introduce immediately upon their discovery in France the various improvements in the Photographic, Daguerreotype, and Ambrotype branches of the art.  The Daguerreian Department will be under the supervision of an accomplished and scientific operator.  The rooms are more spacious, and elegantly arranged than any in New York, and the reception room being situated on the first floor, obviates the necessity of ascending to lofty flights.  In conclusion the proprietor pledges himself to produce pictures which, for clearness delicacy of touch and harmony in coloring shall suit every taste.  These pictures will be of every style and size, and he trusts that those who so long and kindly have extended to him their patronage, will continue to support his endeavors to maintain art in its most refined state.

Charles D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway.                                                                                                      Fredericks, Penabert & German, Philadelphia.                                                                                           Fredericks, Penabert & Leblanc, Paris.

The second advertisement appeared on December 11, 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Photographs.—Penabert of Paris, Photographist; finished in oil, aquarelle and pastel, by the talented and inimitable corps of Parisian artists introduced to this country by C. D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The third advertisement appeared on December 12, 1856 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photographs.—Penabert of Paris, Photographist; finished in oil, aquarelle and pastel, by the talented and inimitable corps of Parisian artists introduced to this country by C. D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The fourth advertisement ran on December 23 & 26, 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Ambrotypes and Melainotypes.—The most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker (formerly of Brady’s Gallery), now at the magnificent Gallery of C. D. Fredericks, Photographist, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Photographs.—Penabert of Paris, Photographist.  Finished in oil, aquarelle, and pastel, by the talented and inimitable corps of Parisian artists, introduced to this country by C. D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Presents For The Holidays.—There is nothing so acceptable for a Holiday present as a beautiful Photograph, Daguerreotype, or Ambrotype, which should be secured as early as possible at Fredericks Magnificent Gallery, No. 585 Broadway, opposite the Metropolitan Hotel.

The fifth advertisement appeared on October 17, 1857 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) .  Card.—Mr. George Penabert, having returned from Paris would be happy to see his friends at Fredricks’s Photographic Temple of Art, 585 and 587 Broadway.

The sixth advertisement appeared on October 17, 1857 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Card.—Mr. George Penabert, having returned from Paris, would be happy to see his friends at Fredricks’s Photographic Temple of Art, 585 and 587 Broadway.

George Penabert is recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 list him as Penabert.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.  Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Sylvester W. & Washington L. Pearsall

1859                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

Sylvester W. & Washington L. Pearsall were recorded in an announcement on February 5, 1859 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  Patents week ending February 1, 1859.  Sylvester W. Pearsall and Washington L. Pearsall, Of New York, New York.—For photographic vise. No. 22,822.

Sylvester W. and Washington L. Pearsall are recorded in American Photographic Patents The Daguerreotype & Wet Plate Era 1840-1880.

Charles W. Peale

1842                Broadway, opposite the City Hall and Park, New York, New York.

Charles W. Peale was recorded in Seven advertisements and two announcements, all but the last entry was recorded from the New York Tribune (New York, New York).  The last entry an announcement is from the New York Daily Tribune.  The first advertisement ran from March 1 to 14, 1842.  New York Museum, Formerly Peale’s, Broadway opposite the City Hall and Park.

The whole collection has recently undergone a new arrangement and many valuable articles added to it.  The Portrait Gallery has been greatly increased and enlarged, as well as the Lecture Room.

Among the Miscellaneous Curiosities may be named the Egyptian Mummy from the City of Thebes, at least 3000 years old, Javanese and other Idols, Sephulcral Vessels containing Ashes of the Dead, Curious Coral (Neptune’s Punch Bowl,) Sea Lions, Siamese Twins, in Wax, &c.

Daguerreotype Likenesses taken from 9 to 4 every day, in a few seconds of time and neatly by Messrs. Morand & Peale.

At 4 o’clock every afternoon some highly interesting experiments in Mesmerism or Animal Magnetism take place.  The subject is a blind lady of intelligence and the operator is Rubens Peale, manager of the museum.

Philosophical Experiments take place every evening in the lecture Room at half past 7; and every Saturday after noon at 3 o’clock.

Fancy Glass Working by Mr. Marshall.

Yearly Tickets for a single person $3; gentleman and lady $5, and for a family $10.  Day visitors admitted the same evening without further charge.

Admission, as usual, 25 cents; Children half price.

The second advertisement ran from March 26 to April 1, 1842.  Peale’s New-York Museum.—day and Evening Exhibitions commenced on Monday. 28th of March, Mr. Harrington, the justly celebrated Ventriloquist and Magician, and Mr. Everard, the laughter-loving Comic Singer, are both engaged for a for a short period…..

Daguerreotype Likenesses taken in the most scientific manner and at moderate prices….

The third advertisement ran from April 5 to 9, 1842.  Daguerreotype Likenesses taken in the most scientific manner and at moderate prices….

The first announcement ran on April 7, 1842.  We would refer those of our readers who understand the Daguerreotype business to the advertisement of C. W. Peale, in another column.

The fourth advertisement ran from April 7 to 9, 1842.  Daguerreotype.—Any person who has a complete apparatus and understands the above business, can find employment at C. W. Peal’s Curiosity Shop; 465 Broadway.  For sale, Specimens of Geology, illustrating the lectures of Prof. Lyell.  Also Geological Cabinets.

The fifth advertisement ran from April 8 to 14, 1842.  Those Persons attending Prof. Lyell’s on Geology are respectfully informed that they can be supplied at C. W. Peale’s “Old Curiosity Shop,” No. 468½ Broadway…Daguerreotype Portraits at $3 each…

The sixth advertisement ran from April 11 to 21, 1842.  Peale’s New-York Museum.—Mr. Delarue, the great Mimie… Daguerreotype Likenesses taken in the most scientific manner and at moderate prices….

The seventh advertisement ran from April 12 to 21, 1842.  Peale’s ‘Old Curiosity Shop,’ No. 468½ Broadway…Daguerreotype Portraits taken from 9 A. M. till 5 P. M. at the moderate price of $3, with a neat morocco case.  Daguerreotype Portraits traded for Clothing, Fancy Articles, Curiosities, Printing, Advertising, &c.  Persons taught and furnished with a apparatus, &c. capable to execute Portraits by the above process, on very moderate terms….

The second announcement appeared in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York)  on April 22, 1842.  Peale’s New-York Museum.—…Daguerreotype Likenesses taken in the most scientific Manner and at moderate prices.  Admittance to the whole 25 cents; children half price.

Charles W. Peale is not listed in other photographic directories it is unknown if he and Morand both took daguerreotypes or was it just Morand.  Looking at the 1842 New York City Directory Augustus Morand, Jr. is listed in the residence section as a daguerreotypist without a business address.

Elijah H. Payne

1843                Rooms at Brush & Roger’s Hotel, Huntington, New York                          1843                Rooms over Dr. Dean’s Dispensary, Sag Harbor, New York.                                1844                Rooms in P. P. King’s New Building, Main Street, Sag Harbor, New York.      1845                Rooms, P. P. King’s Building, Main Street, Sag Harbor, New York.                      1846-1848     Rooms, Exchange Building, Bank-street, New London, Connecticut.

Elijah H. Payne was recorded in one announcement and a total of eight advertisements, one advertisement in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York) and seven advertisements in The Corrector.  The announcement ran on September 22, 1843.  Daguerreotype Portraits.—It is surprising with what accuracy and correctness every feature of the face is delineated by this new process.  Indeed, we could hardly believe the fact, until we visited the rooms of Mr. Elijah H. Payne, at the Suffolk Hotel, a day or two since, where we saw the Portraits of several friends, executed with a brilliancy and richness which we had never seen surpassed.  And so lifelike were they, that a failure to recognize them at once was impossible.  There is also a peculiar softness and delicacy pervading the whole picture, which gives them a very beautiful appearance.  Mr. P. will remain in the village but a very few days, and as his terms are very reasonable, he will no doubt have the pleasure of receiving the patronage of our citizens generally.

The advertisement ran from September 22 to 29, 1843 in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York).   Portraits And Miniatures.  True to the Life! for only $3, case included.  E. H. Payne would respectfully invite the Ladies and Gentlemen of Huntington and its vicinity to call and examine specimens of Miniatures, now exhibiting at his rooms.  Brush & Roger’s Hotel.

All persons desirous of procuring exact likenesses of themselves or friends, can have an opportunity of so doing, and in a style which, for durability, neatness of execution, and correct delineation of feature, is unsurpassed by any other method.  They will also be found to possess that strength, brilliancy and richness, which has heretofore been wanting in Daguerreotype pictures.

Those who have heretofore urged, as an objection to the Daguerreotype Photographs, the want of color, will have to cease, as the subscriber is now enabled to color them like life, for only $5.00, cases included; those who wish family groups of two, three or four, can have them taken on equally reasonable terms.

Those who have daguerreotype miniatures, taken heretofore, that are vague and indistinct, can have them taken over and placed in the same cases, at a very small expense.  Mr. F. [sic.] will make but a temporary stay in this place; any person wishing to obtain a correct likeness will not delay calling immediately.  Elijah H. Payne.

N. B. Instructions given, and all the necessary apparatus furnished (if required), on moderate terms. Any person fond of traveling, or wishing to visit the South, during the winter months, will find this a pleasing and lucrative business.  Huntington, Sept. 22.

The second advertisement (the first) in The Corrector (Sag Harbor, New York) ran from October 14 to November 1, 1843.  A Card.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.  E. H. Payne, would inform his friends and the public, That he has taken a room over Dr. Dean’s Dispensary, Where he will be happy to see those who wish to procure correct likenesses of themselves or friends.  Please call and examine specimens.  Sag Harbor, Oct. 14, 1853.45

The third advertisement ran from May 29 to July 27 1844.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  E. H. Payne, Respectfully announces that he has taken rooms in P. P. King’s new building.  Main street, where he is prepared to take Likenesses in the most approved style (in all kinds of weather) from 9A.M. to 4 P.M., either with or without colors, and warranted equal to any taken in New York or elsewhere.

Seaman who are about leaving home will find this a favorable opportunity for procuring an imperishable and life-like miniature at a very trifling expense—only $3,00 for plain, and from $3,50 to $5,00 for colored ones, neatly set in a Locket, Case or Frame.

Please call and examine specimens.

The fourth advertisement ran from July 27 to August 7, 1844.  A Card.  E. H. Payne, would inform those of his friends who have expressed a desire to have their Likenesses taken by the Daguerreotype process, that he will remain in Sag Harbor, only a few days longer, and he would respectfully invite all who wish accurate and beautiful miniatures of themselves of friends, to call immediately at his rooms in main street;—you may never have so good an opportunity of obtaining a life-like miniature, and at a cost so trifling.  When the hand of death shall have snatched away some loved objects, it will be to late to seek for such transcripts of their cherished features.  Delay not, then, or you may spend years of unavailing sorrow, when it is too late to repair the loss,

The fifth advertisement ran from July 16 to 26, 1845.  Payne’s Daguerreotype Miniature Rooms, P. P. King’s Building, Main Street.  Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather, warranted durable and possessing all the beauties and perfections of nature.

The sixth advertisement ran from July 30 to August 9, 1845.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Only Two Weeks Longer.  E. H. Payne would respectfully inform the inhabitants of this village and its vicinity, that his rooms will be open until the 15th of August, in P. P. Kings building, Main St., where he would be happy to see those who wish to procure Likenesses or examine specimens.

The seventh advertisement ran from August 8, 1846 to April 12 1848.  E. H. Payne’s Daguerreotype Rooms, Exchange Building, Bank-street, N London, Conn.  Likenesses taken by a new and improved process, in one third the time required by ordinary operators, and set in Cases, Frames, Lockets, Bracelets or Rings.

Operators and others, who wish to acquire this new and much admired system of taking pictures will be faithfully instructed, and furnished on as reasonable terms as can be obtained in any city.

Operators and others, who wish to acquire this new and much admired system of taking pictures will be faithfully instructed, and furnished on as reasonable terms as can be obtained in any city.

The eighth advertisement ran from June 23, 1847 to July 31, 1847.  Daguerreotype Likeness.  T. H. Parker would respectfully inform the citizens of Sag Harbor and vicinity, that having availed himself of all the latest improvements, and engaged the services of Mr. Payne, he flatters himself that his likenesses cannot be surpassed, and which he insures not to fade.  Miniatures taken in one third the time generally required.

Likenesses of sick or deceased persons taken at their residences, at the lowest city prices, and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.

Ladies and gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens.

Elijah H. Payne is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list an E. H. Payne as being active in New London, Connecticut ca. 1846, it is unknown if they are the same person.

J. A. Pattenson

1854                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

J. A. Pattenson was listed in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on June 10, 1854.  To The ladies—Wanted, One or Two Ladies with a capital on one hundred and fifty dollars, to learn the stereoscope daguerrean art.  A lady having this amount of capital, and wishing to get in a good and honorable business, good inducements will be made by addressing J. A. Pattenson, Broadway Post Office, with the name and residence.

J. A. Patterson is not listed in other photographic directories.

William B. Parsons

1851                293 Broadway, New York, New York.

William B. Parsons was recorded in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on December 22, 1851.

Card.—Daguerreotypes.—The Subscriber wishes to inform his friends and the public that he is not located at 383 Broadway, as was anticipated, but will be happy to see them at the old stand, 293, where they can obtain pictures equal, if not superior, to any produced from the hands of that celebrated operator,  James P. Perry.

Respectfully, Wm. B. Parsons, 293 Broadway, (Cook’s Gallery)

William B. Parsons is not listed in other photographic directories.

Mr. Paret

1859            279 Bowery, Near First Street, New York, New York.

Paret  was recorded in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on  October 4, 1859.  Paret’s Daguerreotypes—Large Size, For 50 Cents; a true and durable picture, warranted.  Gallery, 279 Bowery, near First street, N. Y.

Paret is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as William A Paret, 297 Bowery.  After looking at modern google address it appears that the 279 Bowery address is probably a typo and that 297 Bowery is closer to First Street.

Paine, M. S.

1855-1856       233 Grand Street, New York, New York.

M S. Paine (of the firm Martin & Paine) was recorded in two advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York) and one article in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal.  The first advertisement appeared on July 10, 1855.  To Daguerreotypists.—Wanted, A Superior daguerrean operator to take an interest in that old established daguerrean gallery, 233 Grand street, corner of Bowery.  Inquire at M. S. Paine writing and bookkeeping, on the same floor, day or evening.

The second advertisement appeared on July 15, 1855.  $10.—Bookkeeping, Time Unlimited—Writing, $2, twelve lessons, at Paine’s, 233 Grand street, corner of the Bowery.  For sale an old established daguerrean gallery, or an operator wanted to take an interest in the same.  Apply at the Writing Academy, 233 Grand street, corner of the Bowery.

The article appeared on January 1, 1856 entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.  Martin & Paine—These gentlemen join two professions in one, book-keeping and daguerreotyping.  Some pretty fair photographs.

Both Martin and Payne are listed as partners in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry. M. S. Paine is not recorded.  At this time it is unknown if Paine was a daguerreotypist or just a partner in the firm.

Mr. Page

1851                84 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York.

Mr. Page was recorded in an announcement in the Jefferson Republican (Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania) on November 27, 1851.  Terrible catastrophe at New York.  Nearly Fifty Children Killed, and Forty or Fifty Wounded.  One of the most lamentable occurrences that we have ever been called on to record, took place at Ward School No. 26, in Greenwich Avenue, opposite Charles street, on Thursday last, the 20th inst., when nearly fifty children lost their lives, and many more were so severely injured, that in all probability they will not recover….—Mr. Page, a daguerrean artist, at No. 84 Eighth avenue, has proffered his services to take without compensation the likenesses of any of the children who were killed or who are likely to die from their injuries.  [From the N. Y. Herald]

Mr. Page is not recorded in other photographic directories with the exact activity dates or address.

A. Page

1841                Clarendon House, 304 Broadway, corner Duane Street, Room 22, fourth Story,                             New York, New York.

A. Page was recorded in one advertisement which ran from  October 4 to 7, 1841 in the New York Tribune.  Photographic Likenesses, (Price very moderate,) By the Daguerreotype Process; Taken By A. Page.  Fourth Story of the Clarendon House, 304 Broadway, Corner Duane st., New-York, Room No. 22.   Likenesses taken in a few seconds in any kind of weather.

A. Page was recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active at 204 Broadway.