Tag Archives: New York City

S. D. Jones

1856                Address Unknown, New York, New York.[1]

S. D. Jones was recorded on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York). In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America. Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

S. D. Jones — Many of the daguerreotypes are deserving of great praise. Others again the contrary.

S. D. Jones does not appear in other photographic directories.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Nathaniel W. Jones

1849                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

Nathaniel W. Jones was recorded in one announcement that appeared on May 17, 1848 in the New York Herald (New York, New York).  Court of General Sessions.  Before the Recorder, and Aldermen Hatfield and Britton….Trial for Grand Larceny.—George W. Butler was put upon trial, charged with grand larceny, in having, on or about the 20th of December last, stolen a number of articles belonging to a daguerreotype apparatus, the property of Nathaniel W. Jones, and worth over $100.  The prosecution fell through, as it was shown that the articles were entrusted to the defendant, by Mr. Jones, who authorized Butler to sell them for him.  The prisoner was, therefore, pronounced not guilty, and discharged from custody.

Nathaniel W. Jones does not appear in other photographic directories.

H. P. Jackson

1845-1846       122 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                           1846-1847       43 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, New York.

H. P. Jackson was recorded three times. The first time was posted two days ago on (August 20, 2019) under Jackson & Gould reporting on a court case (Jackson & Gould vs Insley), second an advertisement and third an announcement.

The advertisement ran from June 13, 1846 to May 21, 1847 in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat (Brooklyn, New York.  Jackson’s N. York & Brooklyn daguerrian Gallery, Removed From 122 Broadway, N. Y. To Number 43 Fulton street, Brooklyn.

The thousands that have patronized this Gallery in New York, afford the best evidence that his portraits cannot be surpassed, if equaled, by any establishment in the United States.  The recent valuable discoveries made by Mr. Jackson in the art enable him to make his portraits permanent and durable, being coated with a surface of pure transparent gold,) while those taken at other establishments have been found to fade.  The ladies and Gentlemen of Brooklyn, together with his old customers in New York, are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens.

H. P. Likenesses of sick or deceased persons taken at residences, at the shortest notice.         

The announcement appeared on November 2, 1846 in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat (Brooklyn, New York).   Local Intelligence: &c….Deferred from Saturday…The office of Wm. Jenkins, Sheriff of Kings county, in the second story of No. 43 Fulton street, was entered on Thursday evening and the thieves found nothing more attractive than a weapon known as a “dummy,” which they carried off with them.  The daguerreotype rooms of Mr. Jackson, on the same floor, were likewise forced open, and a number of pictures stolen, showing that the thieving gentry have cultivated minds and some taste in the fine arts….

H. P. Jackson is only recorded with the 122 Broadway address in 1846-1847 in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Jackson & Weeks

1856                Address Unknown, New York, New York.[1]

Jackson & Weeks were recorded in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on January 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Jackson & Weeks — Some specimens good, some bad, some miserable. Very little attention paid to order and cleanliness.

Jackson & Weeks are recorded in other photographic directories, but are included here because of the first-hand account of their work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Jackson & Waters

1856                Address Unknown, New York, New York.[1]

Jackson & Waters were recorded in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on January 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Jackson & Waters — The general style of daguerreotypes; pretty fair. There is much need of improvement, however.

Jackson & Waters are recorded in other photographic directories, but are included here because of the first-hand account of their work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Jackson & Gould

1845                122 Broadway, New York, New York.

Jackson & Gould (probably H. P. Jackson) were recorded on July 26, 1845 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Court Intelligence.  Marine Court, July 25.—Before Judge Waterbury.—Libel.—Jackson and Gould vs. H. C. [sic.] Insley.—This was an action of libel.  It appeared that the plaintiffs commenced the business of taking Daguerreotype likenesses on 30th June last, and took a room in 122 Broadway.  Defendant, who had been in the business some five or six months, occupied rooms Nos. 10 and 11 on an upper floor of the same building.  Plaintiffs posted up bills on the rise of each step, referring to the old “established Daguerreotype room No. 9,” and also posted on the door the following notice:  “Old established Daguerreotype; no connection with the younger beginners in 4th story.”  It was also shown, that plaintiffs were in the habit of intercepting persons said to be on their way to defendant’s rooms, and induced them to employ themselves.  In answer to these notices, defendant posted the following:  “The so-called ‘old establishment,’ room No. 9, at the head of the stairs, was opened June 30th, 1845, for the base and dishonorable purpose of intercepting persons while on their way to my gallery, Nos. 10 and 11.”  Also the following:  “Caution—As a couple of young beginners have opened at the head of second stairs, for the purpose of intercepting persons on their way to my gallery, this notice is deemed necessary.”  Plaintiffs now seek to recover damages for the posting of the latter notices, alleging them to be libelous.  Defendant justifies, on the ground that plaintiffs had attempted to intercept his customers, by their having posted up the original notices, which rendered it necessary on his part to disabuse the minds of the public, by posting up the notices referred to.  The jury rendered a verdict for plaintiff, 6 cents damages and 6 cents cost, which throws their own cost upon plaintiffs.

Jackson & Gould are not listed in other photographic directories.  This is probably H. P. Jackson who is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York in 1846 at 122 Broadway.

E. Huylar

1855                165 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York

E. Huylar was recorded in an advertisement on September 2, 1855 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photograph’s—Plain or Colored, by Huylar, 165 Eighth avenue, having fitted up this gallery in connection with our daguerreotype business, we would be happy to have our friends give us a call.  E. Huylar, first operator; Professors Leine and Hunt assistants.

E. Huylar is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Edward P. Huylers is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1852 to 1860 and is probably the same person.

William F. Hunter

1854-1856                   252 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]

William F. Hunter was recorded in two advertisements, one announcement and one article in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on July 29, 1854.  Daguerreotype Gallery For Sale.—This Gallery is in a fine location, and well fitted up, with a sky light and every convenience.  Any person who purchases this gallery will be taught the business.  Further particulars can be learned of Wm. F. Hunter, 252 Broadway, opposite City Hall.

The announcement appeared on November 6, 1854.  At A Meeting Of The Sale Makers’ Guard, held on the return of the annual excursion on Friday evening, at the drill room, Centre market, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted—

Resolved, that the thanks of the company be tendered to the following gentlemen for the prizes and good wishes so respectfully given to us on our third annual excursion to…Wm. F. Hunter, order for daguerreotypes;…William F, Hunter, order for daguerreotypes and frame;…

The second advertisement appeared on  June 14, 1855.  Photograph Operator Wanted.—One Who understands the business perfectly can get a fine situation at Hunter’s gallery, 252 Broadway.

The article ran on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  The article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Hunter’s—I was pleased to observe that the proprietor of this gallery is still hunting after the best method for daguerreotyping.  May the hunter be successful.  “The games afoot, follow your spirit,” &c.

William F. Hunter is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, but is recorded here because of the first-hand account of his work.  Also the fact that the he is selling the gallery on July 29, 1854 indicates that he may have been at this location for some time.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Hunt

1856                Corner of Broome Street, New York, New York.[1]

Hunt was recorded  on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Hunt’s cor. Broome — I cannot say much for these pictures, the most, that they are passable. Some however would seem to have come from the artist’s hand.

Hunt is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry with the note attached that it is not Cornelius or Caleb Hunt and is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Hunt

1856                Bowery, New York, New York.[1]

Hunt was recorded  on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Hunt’s, Bowery—This artist seems thoroughly to understand that when a silver plate is coated with dry iodine, exposed to an accelerator and then transferred to the camera, that a shadow of a person placed before it will be impressed upon the plate. May such knowledge meet with its reward.

Hunt is not recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.  Cornelius D. Hunt also on Bowery, is also recorded in this article so the possibility of this being him is slim.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.  Possibly Caleb Hunt but john does not list him at this address.