Tag Archives: New York City

James Landy

1850-N.D.      289 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]                                                                                 N. D.                 233 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]                                                                      1859                145 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

James Landy was recorded in one announcement that appeared on December 28, 1859 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Mr. James Landy, Chemist and Photographic Artist, of long experience in the principal Galleries of New York, has just arrived to fulfill an engagement for one year with C. R. Rees, of 145 Main street.  We suppose with this addition the Steam Gallery will be able to grind out one hundred portraits more daily.

James Landy is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City in 1850 with Silas A. Holmes (for a number of years) and Meade Brothers (dates unknown). The next entry for Landry is 1863 in Cincinnati, Ohio.  It is possible that Landry first met Rees in 1852 when the company was known as Rees & Co. 1852-1854. (Charles R. Rees & Silas A. Holmes.)  Charles R. Rees left the company by March 31, 1854 to open another studio at 385 Broadway.  Silas A. Homes was active at the 289 Broadway address from 1848 to 1859 when Reade Street was enlarged.  More research needs to be done to get a clear and accurate understanding of the relationship between Rees and Holmes.  I currently have large files on both photographers, but I feel more research is needed to get a better understanding of the partnership.

[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Martin Kostza

1854                233 Broadway, New York, New York.

Martin Kostza was recorded in six announcements.  The first appeared on  January 23, 1854 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Martin Kostza Through A Camera.—The discarded patriot has been engaged by the proprietors of a daguerreotype saloon in this city.  They intend to teach him their art gratis, and when he shall have become perfected in it they will give him a set of apparatus, with which he can travel through the country.  We would recommend him to set up his camera in Washington, and give a group representing all the people whom he has raised to fame—Marcy, the President, Commander Ingraham, and all the members of Congress who voted for the medal.  As these gentlemen are each indebted to him for a greater or less amount of glory they cannot refuse him a sitting; and as the people would like to see all the heroes in one grand group, the pockets of the artist might be suddenly replenished.  We trust that Kostza will not fail to act upon this idea.

The second announcement appeared on January 24, 1854 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Martin Koszta.—This Gentleman is now in our establishment.  We have started a subscription for him.  Any sums a charitable community may forward to us we shall  be happy to present him with.  Meade Brother’s, Daguerreotype Galleries, 233 Broadway.

The third announcement appeared on January 26, 1854 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  The Illustrious Koszta.—Martin Koszta, the illustrious, whose name has become familiar as household words on both sides of the Atlantic, and who was the innocent cause of procuring immortality for a naval commander and a Secretary of State, has at length settled down in New York, and is learning the Daguerreotype business.  Koszta is poor, and is compelled to do something for himself, since republics are so ungrateful.  Thus he is anxious to secure the shadow ere the substance perish.  A kind hearted Daguerreotypist has consented to teach him the art gratis, and when he shall have learned it, he will be presented with a set of apparatus with which he can travel through the country.

The fourth announcement appeared on January 26, 1854 in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York).  Koszta, who has latterly been reduced to the brink of starvation, has been taken in by a N. York daguerreotype firm, who intend to teach him the business, furnish him with a set of picture making apparatus and start him on his own hook.

The fifth announcement appeared on February 7, 1854 in The Schenectady Cabinet (Schenectady, New York.  Martin Koszta, the Journal of Commerce says, is engaged in learning the daguerreotype business at Meade Brothers’, in Broadway.  As he was in a destitute condition, these gentlemen have volunteered to assist him, and as soon as qualified, he will probably become an itinerant artist.  His fame will be his capital, which is pretty much all the capital his new business requires.

The sixth announcement appeared on February 8, 1854 in Northern New York Journal (Watertown, New York).  Martin Koszta is now engaged in learning the daguerreotype business at Meade Brothers’, in Broadway.  As he was in a destitute condition, these gentlemen have volunteered to assist him, and as soon as qualified, he will probably become an itinerant artist.  His fame will be his capital, which is pretty much all the capital his new business requires.  He is one of the “distinguished individuals” arriving in this city that has escaped a public reception.—Jour. Of Com.

Martin Koszta is not listed in other photographic directories.

Knickerbocker Dollar Daguerrean Gallery

1848                102 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                      1849                106 Broadway, New York, New York.

Knickerbocker Dollar Daguerrean Gallery or the Knickerbocker Gallery were recorded in two advertisements in the New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on May 8, 1848.  Wanted—A Smart, Intelligent, Well Bred Boy, from 14 to 16, to learn the Daguerreotype business and make himself generally useful.  None need apply but those who are willing to give a month or six weeks for the tuition, before they will receive any salary.  Call at the Knickerbocker Dollar Daguerrean Gallery, 102 Broadway, from 2 to 4 P. M.

The second advertisement appeared on December 18, 1849.  For A Holiday Present—Call And Get Yourself Daguerreotyped at the Knickerbocker Gallery, No. 106 Broadway, corner of Pine st., for one dollar; the same size and in the same manner, as many charge $3, and none less than $1.50, for at other places.  N. B.  Warranted satisfactory or no charge for trouble.

Knickerbocker Dollar Daguerrean Gallery or the Knickerbocker Gallery is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as Knickerbocker Gallery.  John also states that George Magwire is listed as operating Knickerbocker Gallery in 1850-1851.

Knapp

1856                Bowery, New York, New York.[1]

Knapp was recorded on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Knapp’s, Bowery. No specimens on which to form a judgment.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

Knapp is unknown and not recorded in other photographic directories as being active on Bowery in 1855-1856 .  William R. Knapp was listed in an advertisement in the New York Daily Tribune on March 22,1854 as being formerly at 103 Bowery.  Its possible that someone is still using Knapp’s name to attract business.  similar cases are Plumbe’s Galleries and Root’s (Samuel A.)

Knapp & Field

1856                477 Broadway, New York, New York.

Knapp & Field (William R. Knapp & James B. Field) were recorded in two advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on October 31, 1856.  Knapp’s Colored Improved Durable Ambrotypes and daguerreotypes, 50 cents, including case, twice the size others give for the money, at the only Knapp’s gallery in the city, 477 Broadway, near Wallack’s theatre.  Everybody gets them.  Knapp & Fields.

The second advertisement appeared on December 13.  Knapp’s only Gallery of Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes and Melainotypes, 477 Broadway.  J. B. Fields, Proprietor.

Both William R. Knapp and James B. Fields are recorded in other photographic directories but not as part of a partnership.

Kimball & Iles

1856                347 Broadway, New York, New York.

Kimball & Iles (Myron H. Kimball & [George] Iles) appeared in four advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement ran on September 17, 1856.  20 Cent Ambrotypes, with a Case.—Cheapest ever before offered in the world.  Messrs. Kimball & Iles will open their large and commodious ambrotype and daguerreotype gallery, 347 Broadway, corner of Leonard street, on Thursday, the 18th inst., when will be offered to the public beautiful and imperishable likenesses for only twenty cents, each with case.  Mezzographs, photographs, ambrotypes, daguerreotypes and microtypes executed in the first style of the art, at less than half the price asked in any other establishment in America.

The second advertisement ran on September 24, 1856.  Twenty Cent Likenesses, with Case, at Kimball & Iles’ cheap picture factory, 347 Broadway, four hundred taken daily.

The third advertisement ran on October 7, 1856.  20 Cent Likenesses, with Case.—A Beautiful ambrotype likeness, with a case, for only twenty cents.  N. B.—The only establishment in the world where twenty cent portraits can be had.  Kimball & Elis, 347 Broadway.

The fourth advertisement appeared on October 10, 1856.  20 Cent Ambrotype Likenesses, with a case, at Kimball & Iles’, 347 Broadway.  One thousand taken daily.

The partnership of Kimball & Iles is mentioned in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry under Myron H. Kimball, without a hard date, John speculates that George Iles is the other partner, even though George is not listed as a daguerrean until 1858-1859 at 285 Hudson Street.  Myron H. Kimball and George Iles are both recorded in other photographic directories as being active in New York city.  Myron H. Kimball continues to advertise without Iles at the 374 Broadway address.

Mr. Kain

1856                Chatham Street, New York, New York.[1]

Mr. Kain was recorded on  January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Kain, Chatham street—The photographs in this gallery, as a general thing look pretty fair. We saw nothing however to prove this gentleman an artist.

Mr. Kain is listed in other photographic directories, but is included her because of the first hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.  John records Mr. Kain as Henry A. Kane, 418 Grand Street in the partnership of Young & Kane in 1857.

 

S. D. Jones

1856                Address Unknown, New York, New York.[1]

S. D. Jones was recorded on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York). In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America. Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

S. D. Jones — Many of the daguerreotypes are deserving of great praise. Others again the contrary.

S. D. Jones does not appear in other photographic directories.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Nathaniel W. Jones

1849                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

Nathaniel W. Jones was recorded in one announcement that appeared on May 17, 1848 in the New York Herald (New York, New York).  Court of General Sessions.  Before the Recorder, and Aldermen Hatfield and Britton….Trial for Grand Larceny.—George W. Butler was put upon trial, charged with grand larceny, in having, on or about the 20th of December last, stolen a number of articles belonging to a daguerreotype apparatus, the property of Nathaniel W. Jones, and worth over $100.  The prosecution fell through, as it was shown that the articles were entrusted to the defendant, by Mr. Jones, who authorized Butler to sell them for him.  The prisoner was, therefore, pronounced not guilty, and discharged from custody.

Nathaniel W. Jones does not appear in other photographic directories.

H. P. Jackson

1845-1846       122 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                           1846-1847       43 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, New York.

H. P. Jackson was recorded three times. The first time was posted two days ago on (August 20, 2019) under Jackson & Gould reporting on a court case (Jackson & Gould vs Insley), second an advertisement and third an announcement.

The advertisement ran from June 13, 1846 to May 21, 1847 in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat (Brooklyn, New York.  Jackson’s N. York & Brooklyn daguerrian Gallery, Removed From 122 Broadway, N. Y. To Number 43 Fulton street, Brooklyn.

The thousands that have patronized this Gallery in New York, afford the best evidence that his portraits cannot be surpassed, if equaled, by any establishment in the United States.  The recent valuable discoveries made by Mr. Jackson in the art enable him to make his portraits permanent and durable, being coated with a surface of pure transparent gold,) while those taken at other establishments have been found to fade.  The ladies and Gentlemen of Brooklyn, together with his old customers in New York, are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens.

H. P. Likenesses of sick or deceased persons taken at residences, at the shortest notice.         

The announcement appeared on November 2, 1846 in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat (Brooklyn, New York).   Local Intelligence: &c….Deferred from Saturday…The office of Wm. Jenkins, Sheriff of Kings county, in the second story of No. 43 Fulton street, was entered on Thursday evening and the thieves found nothing more attractive than a weapon known as a “dummy,” which they carried off with them.  The daguerreotype rooms of Mr. Jackson, on the same floor, were likewise forced open, and a number of pictures stolen, showing that the thieving gentry have cultivated minds and some taste in the fine arts….

H. P. Jackson is only recorded with the 122 Broadway address in 1846-1847 in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.