Tag Archives: New York City

Albert St. James

1857    337 Broadway, New York, New York.

Albert St. James of the firm Foulley & St. James was recorded in one entry in the 1857/1858 New York City Directory (New York, New York) and two advertisements in The New York Herald.  He is recorded in the 1857/1858 NYC directory under Foulley & St. James as Photograph Stock, 337 Broadway, under his mane he is recorded as St. James, Albert, Chemicals 337 Broadway, H-194 Fourth.  His wife’s entry reads.  St. James, Augusta, Widow, H-194 Fourth.  Which corresponds with the information in the second advertisement.

The first advertisement appeared on September 2, 1857.  Photographic Album Of American Views—published under the superintendence of G. Cousin, French artist.  Weekly subscription, $1.  Four views. 9 inches long and 7 inches wide, every week.  For particulars apply to Foulley & St. James, 337 Broadway.  N. B.—Orders received for views of every description.  Reproduction of engravings and engines.

1857 October 16.  The New York Herald.  (New York, New York.)  October 16, 1857, Whole No. 7715, P. 6.

Mr. A. Foulley Respectfully Informs His friends, the customers of the late partnership and the public generally, that he will continue the business at the old stand, where will be found a complete assortment of the articles which compose a photographic stock, especially pass-partout and fancy frames in every style.  Please call at 337 Broadway, N. Y.  A Foulley.

Albert St. James is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry without a first name, and a typo of the business address.  

Alexander Rodgers

1847                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

Alexander Rodgers was recorded in two announcements (same announcement in two different newspapers).  The first appeared on April 15, 1847 in the Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.)  Mr. Alexander Rodgers, a daguerreotypist, fell dead in the streets of New York on Monday.  It is supposed that his death was superinduced by inhalation from the mercury bath, which he is compelled to use in the practice of his art.

The second appeared on April 16, 1847 in the Richmond Whig (Richmond, Virginia).  Mr. Alexander Rodgers, a daguerreotypist, fell dead in the streets of New York on Monday.  It is supposed that his death was superinduced by inhalation from the mercury bath, which he is compelled to use in the practice of his art.

Alexander Rodgers is not recorded in other photographic directories.

E. Punderson

1845                Address Unknown, Factory Island, Saco, Maine.

1846                Address Unknown, Saco, Maine.

1846                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

1846                Rooms Directly Opposite the Post Office, Saco, Maine.

1847                Rooms Over Nathaniel Churchill’s Store, Exeter, New Hampshire.

E. Punderson was recorded in four advertisements.  The first advertisement ran on December 23 & 30, 1845 in the Maine Democrat (Saco, Maine).  Wish you Merry Christmas!  All persons wishing to present their friends with a valuable Christmas or New Year’s Gift-one which will be valued far beyond its cost—one which time instead of impairing will only render more valuable—and one which as often as seen cannot fail to call to mind the giver, can obtain such by calling at Punderson’s Daguerrian Rooms, Factory Island, where by favoring him with the Light Of Their Countenance for a few seconds, he will furnish them with a perfect and well executed Likeness, for the trifling of [$2.50] which will be by far the most beautiful and valuable gift of any which can be obtained for a similar cost.

A very handsome assortment of Gold and Gilt Lockets just received which will be sold at a very small advance from cost.

The second advertisement appeared on April 14, 1846 in the Maine Democrat.  Perfect likenesses, By the Daguerreotype Process, For Only $2.50.  E. Punderson would respectfully announce to the citizens of Saco and vicinity, that he intends remaining in this place For One Week Longer Only.  Those wishing correct and beautifully executed likenesses of themselves or friends, will probably never have a better opportunity than the present.

It would seem wholly unnecessary to urge upon any reflecting mind the importance of securing a likeness of every member of their family.  ‘Tis true that whilst surrounded by the object of our love, a likeness may seem of but little value; but let death enter the family circle and remove from the number a beloved parent, brother or child, ‘tis than that their likeness becomes valuable.—How valuable, those only who possess such a memento of a dearly loved but departed friend can well realize.

Hours of operating from 9 A. M. to 4½ P. M.  Pictures taken without regard to weather.  Rooms open evenings for the exhibition of pictures. 

The third advertisement ran from July 28 to September 22, 1846 in the Maine Democrat.  Punderson’s Daguerrean Rooms Re-Opened.  E. Punderson, having returned from N. York, where he has been for the purpose of perfecting himself in the recent improvements made in the art, again offers his services to the citizens of Saco and vicinity, and pledges himself that his pictures shall not be surpassed by those of any operator in the country.

He would respectfully invite those wishing correct and well-executed likenesses, to call at his rooms, Directly opposite the Post Office, where perfect satisfaction will be given or no charge,  The liberal patronage bestowed upon him during his long stay in this place, is of itself sufficient proof of the high estimation in which his pictures are held, and no pains will be spared to secure a continuance of the same.  It appears to be the general impression that pictures taken in cloudy weather, are not as good as those taken in a clear day.  This is incorrect; the only difference being that in a cloudy day it is necessary to sit a few seconds longer; but the effect is the same.

Pictures set in frames, cases, lockets, pins or rings.  Hours of operating from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M.

The fourth advertisement ran on March 8 & 15, 1847 in the Exeter News-Letter and Rockingham Adviser (Exeter, New Hampshire).  With Or Without Colors.  How often do we hear the wish expressed for the miniature of an absent or a deceased friend?  And indeed who has not at one time or other vainly endeavored (for want of one of these little remembrances) to recall the features that once reflected all our dreams of love and beauty?  The smiling lip and laughing eye—the manly brow and thoughtful gaze of some dear companion, parent or friend, and sighed to think that they were lost to us forever?  Who does not love, whilst pondering o’er the sunshine and shadows of the past to be able to gaze on the countenance of some dear and early loved, but mourned and buried friend?

It would seem hardly necessary to urge upon any reflection mind the importance of securing likenesses of themselves and family.  It is true, that whilst surrounded by the objects of our love, a likeness may seem of but little or no consequence, but let death enter that circle and remove one after another, it is then their likeness becomes valuable—how valuable those only who have been so fortunate as to secure this memento of a departed friend can well realize.

Formerly the time spent in obtaining a likeness and the expense attending it, together with the uncertainty of finally procuring one which would be satisfactory were serious objections and deterred many from sitting for their pictures.  But this wonderful discovery a picture may be obtained in a few seconds which for beauty and accuracy of delineation cannot be surpassed by any painting, it being no fancy sketch of the Artist, but the ‘bona fide’ shadow itself, and that too at an expense so trifling that almost every person can obtain a likeness not only of himself but of every member of his family.

The subscriber having been under the instruction of the first operators in the city of New York, and having been for a long time practically engaged in the business, sparing neither pains nor expense in availing himself of all the recent improvements in the art, flatters himself that his pictures for accuracy and beauty of execution cannot be surpassed by those of any operator; and he would respectfully invite all, whether they contemplate sitting for their pictures or not, to call at his Rooms, over Nathaniel Churchill’s Store, and examine his specimens.  They will thus be enabled to judge for themselves.  As he intends remaining in this place for a short time only, those wishing their pictures will do well to give him an early call.

Portraits and Miniatures copied with perfect accuracy.  Pictures set in Frames, Cases, Lockets, Bracelets, &c.  No person will be expected to take a picture unless perfectly satisfied with the execution.  Likenesses taken without regard to weather.

Hours of operating, from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M.  Rooms open Evenings for the exhibition of Pictures.  E. Punderson.

E. Punderson is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in Exeter, New Hampshire in 1847.

John M. Parker

1860.               Address Unknown, New York, New York.

John M. Parker was recorded in one article that appeared on May 25, 1860 in The New York Times (New York, New York).  Law Report.  General Sessions.  The Court of General Sessions, Judge Russell presiding, commenced to try cases yesterday, at 11 A. M., and did not adjourn till some minutes after 6 P. M.  Yet only three cases were tried, and but one disposed of. 

John M. Parker, alias King, was charged with the manufacture of counterfeit bills on the Exchange Bank of Hartford, Conn.  He was a young man of respectable appearance, and a daguerreotypist by profession.  The principal evidence against him, perhaps, was a large box in his apartment in Fifty-second-street, containing about twenty bottles of chemicals, such as are used in the photographing process; several sheets of paper, resembling that on which bank bills are printed, but of inferior quality; and a newspaper, on which test had been made of the color and force of the stamp, in red designed for the denomination of the bills.  The bills exhibited in Court were evidently photographs, and were not good specimens of the craft of the artist.

A Man named Thomas Newell was detected in Fifty-first-street, on March 29, attempting to pass some of these bills.  He was a co-mate of Parker’s, residing in the same house, and his arrest led to that of Parker.  He will probably be tried to-day.  The defence yesterday set up for Parker was, that he was a daguerreotypist and photographer by profession, and that in taking photographic impressions of these bills he was only practicing, just as a young artist would sketch anywhere and everywhere, to give him facility and skill.  The jury, however, took another view of his photographing propensities and found him guilty of the offence charged.  Where-upon Judge Russell thought that a residence of five years in the State Prison would be beneficial to him, and he goes there, and for that time, accordingly.

John M. Parker is not recorded in other photographic directories, he is also not listed in the New York City Directories.

Pacific Chemical Laboratory

1852                Vanderbilt and Charlton avenue, Brooklyn, New York.

Pacific Chemical Laboratory appeared in one advertisement on December 16, 1852 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Pacific Chemical Laboratory, Pacific street, between Vanderbilt and Charlton avenue, Brooklyn.—Office No.  11 Wall street, third floor, room No. 16.—A. Fancike & Kraft, manufacturers of pure chemicals.  Reagents daguerreotype apparatus, acids, ethers, ammonia, metallic oxides, and other fine chemicals, &c….

Pacific Chemical Laboratory is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Norton & Carden

1854                369 Broadway, New York, New York.

Norton & Carden were recorded in four advertisements, the first three advertisements are from The New York Herald (New York, New York), and one advertisement from The Photographic And Fine Art Journal (New York, New York), followed by three entries from the New York City Directories for 1853/1854; 1854/1855 and 1855/1856 1854.  The first advertisement appeared on June 5, 1854.

Stop! Stop! Stop!—It is the Fashion for all

To go to the daguerrean called International.

Kept by Norton & Carden, two artist of merit,

Who into your portraits throw nature and spirit.

So, quickly step into their gallery of art,

And they warrant a fine picture ere you depart.

Norton & Carden, 369 Broadway, next door to Taylor’s saloon.

The second on June 6, 1854.

Daguerreotypes—Daguerreotypes

Talk of your Browns, your Jenkins or others

Who take portraits of mothers, sisters or brothers,

A [  ?  ] is display’d which ne’er was thought on

In those which are taken by Carden and Norton;

They are all pronounced good, in fact they are fine,

So don’t forget its in Broadway, number three six nine.

The third on June 7, 1854.

Daguerreotypes-Daguerreotypes—“I Say, my friend, where are you going?”  “Why I am going as fast as I can to Norton & Carden’s international daguerrean gallery, to have my portrait taken; they are always good.”  “Are they?  Then I’ll go too.”  Norton & Carden, 369 Broadway, next to Taylor’s saloon.

The fourth advertisement appeared in The Photographic And Fine Art Journal on July 1854. 

Norton & Cardon—Have opened a Daguerrean Gallery at No. 369 Broadway…

1853.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1853-1854.

Carden, Robert A., daguerreotypes, 293 Broadway, h-[293] Broadway.

Carden & Co., daguerreotypes, 293 Broadway.

Norton, Elijah F.—not listed.

Norton, William H.—not listed.

1854.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1854-1855.

Carden, Robert A., daguerreotypes, 369 Broadway, residence not listed.

Norton & Carden, daguerreians, 369 Broadway.

Norton, Elijah F. not listed.

Norton, William H., actor, 369 Broadway, residence not listed.  

1855.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)  1855-1856.

Carden, Robert A.—not listed.

Norton, Elijah F.—not listed

Orton, William H.—not listed.

Norton & Carden is recorded in Craig’s Daguerrean Registry, but it is misleading the information provided is not consistent as to the identity of Norton, under Robert A. Carden Norton he is identified as W. H. and under Elijah F. Norton, John states that he is possibly the same Norton in the partnership.  W. H. Norton is not listed as being active in New York City, John does list a W. H. Norton in Boston in 1860.  In A Directory Of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900 he is recorded in Boston as a piano maker in 1859 and a photographer in 1860 at 49 Tremont.

Morand & Cockroft

1842-1843       73 Chambers Street, New York, New York.

Morand & Cockcroft (Augustus Morand & S. Cockcroft) in five advertisements in The Evening Post (New York, New York) and one listing in the New York City Directory, 1843.  The first advertisement ran on  August 20 & 27, 1842.  Photographic Likenesses;  By an improved Daguerreotype process, are taken at the Van Loan Photographic Establishment, upper story of granite buildings, corner of Broadway and Chambers st. N. Y.  (entrance No. 73 Champers street,)  By S. Cockcroft and A. Morand, Jr.

Likenesses taken from 8 A. M. till sundown, in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy or rainy.

N. B. Apparatus, with all the modern improvements, furnished at the above establishment.  au20.

The second advertisement ran on August 24 to September 14, 1842.Photographic Likenesses;  By an improved Daguerreotype Process, are taken at the Van Loan Photographic Establishment, Upper story of the building corner of Broadway and Chambers st. N. Y.  Entrance No. 73 Champers street.  By S. Cockcroft and A. Morand, Jr.

Likenesses taken from 7 A. M. till sundown, in any kind of weather—clear, cloudy, or rainy.

N. B. Apparatus, with all the modern improvements, furnished at the above establishment. 

The third advertisement ran from August 24 to 26, 1842.  Instruction In Daguerreotype given by Morand & Cockcroft, No. 73 Chambers street, N. Y.

The fourth advertisement ran from September 8 to 10, 1842.  Instruction In Daguerreotype given by Morand & Cockcroft, No. 73 Chambers street, N. Y.

The fifth advertisement ran from September 17 to 26, 1842.  Daguerreotype Miniatures Are taken by Morand & Cockcroft, at Adams’ granite building, corner Broadway and Chambers street, in any dress, one every day, except Sunday.  Entrance 73 Chambers street.

Daguerreotype Plates—A new lot, just received and for sale by Morland, 73 Chambers st., cor. Broadway. 

1843.  New York City Directory.  (New York, New York.)   1843/1844, P. 244.

Morand & Cockroft, daguerreotype, 73 Chambers.

Morand & Cockroft are recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1843-1844.  In looking through the NY City Directories, S. Cockroft does not appear in the 1841/1842; 1842/1843; 1843/1844 or the 1844/1845 directories.  A Samuel Cockeroft does appear as a Lawyer.  First in 1841/42 & 1842/43  at 68 Ann; in 1843/44 at 4 Wall and in 1844/45 at 140 Nassau.  It is unknown if they are the same person.

John Lewis

1851                142 Chatham, New York, New York[1]

1855                Chatham Street, New York, New York.

John Lewis was recorded in the 1851/1852 New York City Directory.  Daguerreotypes—142 Chatham—H-28 Eldridge.  Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was not listed in the 1852/1853 directory—Published by John Doggett; also not listed in the following directories 1853/1854—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1854/1855—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1855/1856—Published by John Fowler Trow; and the 1856/1857—Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was also recorded in one announcement that appeared on October 5, 1855 in the Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D. C.)  Distressing Occurrence—At New York, on Tuesday, Coroner Kidder was called to hold an inquest upon the body of the wife of Mr. John Lewis, who came to her death under the following circumstances:  Mr. Lewis her husband, had for some time been ill with fever , and occasionally delirious.  On Monday, during one of these spells, he became unmanageable, and persisted in jumping out of the window of his room, which was on  the third floor.  No one but his wife happened to be present at the time, his mother, who resides with them, being down stairs.  His wife, who was a small delicate woman, tried every means in her power to keep him quite, but he, becoming perfectly frantic, made tor the rear window.  She seized him and endeavored to draw him back, when he suddenly leaped through the sash and both man and woman were dashed upon the pavement below, a distance of about twenty-five feet.  Mrs. Lewis struck her head upon the door-step and was instantly killed.  Mr. Lewis was seriously injured, and now lies at the city hospital in a precarious condition.  He is a daguerreotypist, doing business in Chatham street.

John Lewis is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City from 1851 to 1853.


[1] 1851/1852 New York City Directory.

Theodore Lessey

1859                534 Broadway, New York, New York.

Theodore Lessey were recorded in two advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on September 3, 1859.  America In The Stereoscope.  A series of American Scenery, Photographed And Published By The London Stereoscopic Company.  Theodore Lessey, 534 Broadway, Manager of the United States Depot.

The second appeared on September 5, 1859.  American Scenery.—The London Stereoscopic Company.  The finest views of American Scenery are those photographed and published by the London Stereoscopic Company, who supply their depot in New York by every steamer with all kinds of stereoscopic groups and views, plain, colored and illuminated.  Stereoscopes of every variety, and at prices ranging from 50c. upwards.  Manager, Theo.  Lessey, 534 Broadway, New York.

Theodore Lessey is not record in other photographic directories.

Professor Laine

1855                165 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York.

Professor Laine was mentioned in an advertisement that appeared on September 2, 1855 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photograph’s—Plain or Colored, by Huylar, 165 Eighth avenue, having fitted up this gallery in connection with our daguerreotype business, we would be happy to have our friends give us a call.  E. Huylar, first operator; Professors Leine and Hunt assistants.

Professor Laine is not recorded in other photographic directories.  In a search of the New York City Directories for 1854/1855; 1855/1856 and the 1856/1857 no additional information was found to help identify who Professor Laine was.