Tag Archives: New York City

McClave & Merritt

1854                385 Broadway, New York, New York.

McClave & Merritt (James McClave, Jr. & John D. Merritt) were recorded in nine advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first appeared on September 12, 1854.

Rees & Co., 25 Cent Daguerreotype Company, 385 Broadway.—This company, established under the above name, will be conducted hereafter under the [head] of McClave & Merritt, the original partners from [the commencement.]  The business will be conducted the same as usual, the whole company remaining with the exception of C. Rees, whose interest in this gallery has been purchased by the two remaining partners.  McClave & Merritt.

The second advertisement appeared on September 16, 1854.  Rees & Co., the Original Twenty-five [cent] Daguerreotypist, 385 Broadway.—this company [  ?  ] known by the above name, will hereafter be [conducted] under the head of McClave & Merritt, [the original] partners from its commencement.  They having [  ?  ] the interest of Mr. Rees.

The third advertisement appeared on September 23, 1854.  Rees & Co., the Original 25 Cent Daguerreotypist, 385 Broadway, are now taking 600 pictures daily, and will soon be enabled to take 1,000, by the aid of their new machinery and enlarged rooms, by the original partners from the commencement.  McClave & Merritt.

The fourth advertisement appeared on September 26, 1854.  The 25 cent Daguerreotype Company, 385 Broadway, so long known by the name of Rees & Co., [and] hereafter be carried on under the head of McClave & Merritt, the original partners from its commencement.  [600] hundred pictures taken daily with entire satisfaction.  McClave & Merritt, 385 Broadway.

The fifth advertisement appeared on September 28, 1854.  The original 25 cent Daguerreotype Company, 385 Broadway, so long known by the name of Rees & Co., [and] hereafter be carried on under the head of McClave & Merritt, the original partners from its commencement, who will soon be enabled to take one thousand pictures daily.

The sixth advertisement appeared on October 12, 1854.  A Daguerreotype in Case for 25 Cents.—Rees & Co., as formerly known, now McClave & Merritt, having their new and novel machine, which was exhibited at Crystal Palace, now in full operation, will in future take pictures, in case, complete, for 25 cents.

The seventh advertisement appeared  on October 13, 1854.  A Daguerreotype in Case for 25 cents, at McClave & Merritt’s, (formerly Rees & Co.,) 385  Broadway.

The eighth advertisement appeared on October 19, 1854.  Immense Success.—A Daguerreotype in Case for twenty-five cents.  McClave & Merritt, formerly Rees & Co., 385 Broadway, are now enabled, by the help of their new and novel machine, to give a daguerreotype, in a neat morocco case, all complete for 25 cents.

The ninth advertisement appeared on October 31, 1854.  A Daguerreotype in Case for 25 Cents, at McClave & Merritt’s, formerly Rees & Co., 385 Broadway, between White and Walker streets.

McClave & Merritt are listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry but, John does not mention that they were partners, or the connection to Rees & Co.

William Loyd

1856                522 Broadway, New York, New York.

William Loyd was recorded in five advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York) in association with Langenheim Brothers.  The first advertisement appeared on April 7, 1856.  W. Loyd’s Improved Stereoscope, with F. Langenheim’s new series of American views— Niagara Falls, Genesee Valley, The Pottsville Coal Region, and other new views. A large assortment just received, by Benj. Pike & Sons, 518 Broadway.

The second advertisement appeared on August 6, 1856.  Loyd’s Patent Improved Stereoscope, with Langenheim’s new series of American views, upon glass, and colored to nature.  Publication office 522 Broadway, opposite the St. Nicholas.  William Loyd, sole proprietor of Langenheim’s stereoscopic views.

The third advertisement ran from September 3 to 6, 1856.  Langenheim’s Stereoscopic Views upon glass.—Just received, a fresh supply of new and interesting scenery.  Dealers supplied at the publication office and photographic studio of William Loyd and F. Langenheim, 522 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel.

The fourth advertisement appeared on December 13, 1856.  Loyd’s Improved Stereoscope Case with Langenheim’s views upon glass.  Sold by Pike & Sons; B. Pike, Jr., and Appleton & Co.  Dealers furnished with the above.  Terms cash.  William Loyd.  188 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, and 522 Broadway.

The fifth ad appeared on December 26, 1857.  The American Stereoscopic Company’s New series of views on glass and colored to nature are sold by Benjamin Pike & Sons, Benj. Pike, Jr., Wiley & Halstead, Broadway; F. J. Emmerich, 111 Fulton street.  Dealers supplied by Langenheim, Loyd & Co., Philadelphia.

William Loyd also spelled Lloyd is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Register as William Lloyd, but does not include the Langenheim connection.

George M. or W. Loud

1856                233 Grand Street, New York, New York.[1]                                                                      1858                132 Bowery, New York, New York.

George M. or W. Loud was recorded in one advertisement and one article. The article appeared on  January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Professor Loud — This artist is determined not to lose customers by being silent. A small label is attached to each of his pictures stating the peculiar value of each. His ivory stereoscopic pictures are pretty fair, as also some of his ambrotypes. Professor Loud seems to doubt the correctness of the term ambrotype by the following label; “Glass picture, by some called Ambrotype.” Professor Loud is also a poet, as the following will show :

Ambrotype — Of the sweet forms we cherish                                                                                                Secure this kind of picture                                                                                                                                 E’re the substance perish.

The advertisement appeared on June 13, 1858 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photographic Artist Read.—Louds’ Improved white varnish will preserve your negatives, melainotypes and ambrotypes.  Call and get a bottle to try.  Price only 38 cents for six ounce bottle.  The cheapest and best in the market.  Louds, 132 Bowery.

George M. or W. Loud is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

Jules E. Loiseau

1856                423 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]

Jules E. Loiseau was recorded on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal  (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

J. E. Loiseau—A French artist. The gallery contains some very fair photographs.

J. E. Loiseau is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included because of the first- hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Maurice W. Lockwood

1854-1855       Corner Eighth Avenue and Fourteenth Street, New York, New York.              1856                   186 West 18th Street, New York, New York.[1]                                                              1856-1857       145 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York.                                                                          1858                   185 8th Avenue, New York, New York.

Maurice W. Lockwood was listed in seven advertisements and one notice in The New York Herald (New York, New York) (to date) also he was mentioned in one article.  The first advertisement appeared on June 2, 1854.  Splendid Daguerreotypes, Double the Size of those taken elsewhere, including a fine case and preserver, for only 50 cents, at Lockwood’s, corner of Eighth Avenue and Fourteenth street.

The second ad appeared on January 24, 1855.  Daguerrean Gallery For Sale, Cheap For cash, doing a good business.  For particulars apply to M. W. Lockwood, corner of Eighth avenue and Fourteenth street.

The notice appeared on April 2, 1855.  Charge Of Taking Daguerreotypes On Sunday.  M. W. Lockwood, a daguerreotypist, doing business at the corner of Eighth avenue and Fourteenth street, was arrested yesterday by Captain Ackerman, of the Ninth ward police, charged with having taken daguerreotype likenesses on Sunday, contrary to a city ordinance.  The accused was arrested on the complaint of officer Winars, who, it is alleged, entered Lockwood’s place and got his likeness taken, as also did his brother and several others who were present.  The artist, along with his show case, which was standing on the sidewalk, was conveyed before Justice Davison, at the Jefferson Market Police Court, where a fine of one dollar was imposed upon the offender.

The article appeared on January 1, 1856 in Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Lockwood, 18th street — I cannot say much for this gallery. The artist must be young in the art, and therein his excuse.

The third advertisement appeared on April 28, 1856.  Extra Large Ambrotypes, In Gilt Cases, for only fifty cents, warranted equal to any sold elsewhere for $2, at M. E. Lockwood’s gallery, 186 Eighteenth street, one door west of Eighth avenue.

The fourth advertisement appeared on August 15, 1856.  To Ambrotypists.—Something Entirely New and original.—Lockwood’s heileoprints, on paper, far surpassing anything ever yet produced in the picture line.  Beware of imposters, as I have no agents canvassing the city, but will teach the art at M. E. Lockwood’s gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.  Call and see specimens.  The only place in the world where a large sized ambrotype can be had for 25 cents, including case.  Gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.

The fifth ad appeared on September 30, 1856.  Large Size Ambrotypes, In Cases, only 25c.—The same size, and warranted equal to those others make for one dollar, at M. E. Lockwood’s, Gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.

The sixth ad appeared on April 10, 1857.  Lockwood’s Ambrotypes—Large size, beautifully colored, including case, only twenty-five cents of the same size and warranted equal to any made elsewhere for one dollar.  Gallery No. 145 Eighth avenue.

The seventh advertisement appeared on November 19, 1858.  Beautifully Colored Ambrotypes in genuine Union Cases for 50 cents, warranted equal to any sold elsewhere for $2, at Lockwood’s, No. 185 8th-av.

Maurice W. Lockwood is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  He is recorded here because of the additional information.  M. E. Lockwood maybe the same person.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

M. E. Lockwood

1856-1857       145 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York.

M. E. Lockwood was recorded in four advertisements that appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York). The first advertisement ran on April 28, 1856.  Extra Large Ambrotypes, In Gilt Cases, for only fifty cents, warranted equal to any sold elsewhere for $2, at M. E. Lockwood’s gallery, 186 Eighteenth street, one door west of Eighth avenue.

The second advertisement appeared on August 15, 1856.  To Ambrotypists.—Something Entirely New and original.—Lockwood’s heileoprints, on paper, far surpassing anything ever yet produced in the picture line.  Beware of imposters, as I have no agents canvassing the city, but will teach the art at M. E. Lockwood’s gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.  Call and see specimens.  The only place in the world where a large sized ambrotype can be had for 25 cents, including case.  Gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.

The third advertisement appeared on September 30, 1856.  Large Size Ambrotypes, In Cases, only 25c.—The same size, and warranted equal to those others make for one dollar, at M. E. Lockwood’s, Gallery, 145 Eighth avenue.

The fourth advertisement appeared on May 25, 1857.  Stop that Croaking.—Lockwood Defies competition, but invites comparison.  Ten Cent ambrotypes—ambrotypes ten cents.  Large size, including frame, only ten cents, at M. E. Lockwood’s gallery, 145 Eighth avenue; three thousand daily.  Fancy cases less than others charge for common ones.  N. B.—No connection with any other gallery.  Likenesses of deceased persons and invalids taken at their residences.  No. 145 Eighth avenue, one door north of seventeenth street.

M. E. Lockwood is not recorded in other photographic directories. There is a strong possibility that this is Maurice W. Lockwood.

Loozinski L. Lewis

1856                663 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]

Loozinski L. Lewis was recorded on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal  (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

L. L. Lewis, Broadway — I admired these pictures especially for their regularity. They are sharp and clear ; the eyes are well defined and show some animation. I was much pleased with the arrangements.

Loozinski L. Lewis is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Professor Leine

1855                165 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York.

Professor Leine was recorded in an advertisement for Edward P. Huylar on September 2, 1855 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Photograph’s—Plain or Colored, by Huylar, 165 Eighth avenue, having fitted up this gallery in connection with our daguerreotype business, we would be happy to have our friends give us a call.  E. Huylar, first operator; Professors Leine and Hunt assistants.

Professor Leine is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Edward P. Huylar is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as Edward P. Huylers.

Legal & Bouland

1850                86 William Street, New York, New York.

Legal & Bouland (Eugene Legal & Fred B. Bouland) were recorded in one advertisement that ran on September 19 & 20, 1850 in the New York Herald (New York, New York).  Daguerreotype Plates.—For sale Cheap, A small consignment of Daguerreotype Plates.Legal & Bouland, 86 William street, up stairs.

Legal & Bouland are not listed in other photographic directories.  Both Eugene Legal and Fred B. Bouland are listed in the 1850 New York City resident directory as Importers, 86 William Street.

F. C. Lawrence

1851                12 Wall Street, New York, New York.                                                                        1851                8 Wall Street, New York, New York.

F. C. Lawrence was recorded in three advertisements. The first Advertisement ran from January 21 to 29, 1851 in The New York Herald (New York, New York). Daguerreotype Plates At auction.  F. C. Lawrence & Co., No. 12 Wall street, will sell, on Thursday, 30th inst., at four o’clock P. M., precisely, a large lot of very fine French Daguerreotype Plates, to close a consignment.  The will be sold in lots of one hundred plates.  Terms, under $250, cash; above that amount four months approved endorsed paper.  catalogues now ready.  Goods may be examined two days before the sale.

The second advertisement appeared on January 30, 1851 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Attention Daguerreotypist!—Great Auction Sale of several 1,000 Star Plates, No. 40.  Also, valuable Carved Wood Daguerreotype Frames to fit up a gallery, and a large lot of French Passepartouts, by F. C. Lawrence & Co. 8 Wall-st., this day.  The goods are ready for examination.  Such an opportunity rarely occurs.

The third advertisement appeared on January 30, 1851 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Attention Daguerreotypist.—Great Auction Sale of several 1,000 Star Plates No. 40.  Also valuable Carved Wood Daguerreotype Frames to fit up a Gallery, and a large lot of French Passepartouts, by F. C. Lawrence & Co. 8 Wall-st.  This Day.  The goods are ready for examination.  Such an opportunity rarely occurs.

F. C. Lawrence is not listed in other photographic directories. He is also not listed in the 1850-1851 or 1851-1852 New York City directory.