Parker & Douglas

1849-1850       Address Unknown, Sag Harbor, New York.

Parker & Douglas (Thomas Hazard Parker & Douglas) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from May 12, 1849 to July 27, 1850 in The Corrector (Sag Harbor, New York).  Daguerreotype Likenesses Taken at Parker & Douglas’s Daguerrean Rooms, with a large and improved apparatus, and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  Ladies and gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine their specimens.

Parker & Douglas (Thomas Hazard Parker & Douglas) are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Parker & Bellows

1850-1851       Address Unknown, Sag Harbor, New York.

Parker & Bellows (Thomas Hazard Parker & Henry S. Bellows) were recorded in two advertisements in The Corrector (Sag Harbor, New York).  The first advertisement ran from July 31, 1850 to July 23, 1851.  Daguerreotype Likenesses Taken at Parker & Bellows’s Daguerrean Rooms, with a large and improved apparatus, and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.  Ladies and gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine their specimens.

The second advertisement ran from July 23 to September 17, 1851. All relations heretofore existing between T. Hazard Parker and Henry S. Bellows, in the Daguerrean business, are this day dissolved, by mutual consent.

All bills connected with the business, will be settled by T. Hazard Parker.  Sag Harbor, July 23, 1851.  T. H. Parker, H. S. Bellows.

Thomas Hazard Parker & Henry S. Bellows are not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. Park

1859                Address and Location Unknown.

J. Park was recorded in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 19, 1859. Wanted.—An Ambrotypist Wishes A Situation; has had eight years experience at the business, five years ambrotyping, three years daguerreotyping.  Address for two days, J. Park, Herald office.

J. Park is not listed in other photographic directories. At this time it is unknown if he found employment or not. In addition it is unknown where he was located or who he worked for since 1851.

Isaac Parish

1858                Morse’s Building, corner Pike & Main Streets, Port Jervis, New York.                      1858                Address Unknown, location Unknown, New Jersey.                                                      1858-1859     Opposite St. John’s Store, Port Jervis, New York.                                                    1859                 Address Unknown, Monticello, New York.

Isaac Parish was recorded in five advertisements and one announcement in the Tri-State Union  (Port Jervis, New York).  The first is for Parish & Edson (posted yesterday) the advertisement ran from February 11 to March 25, 1858.  Ambrotypes and Albatypes.  Parish & Edson, the celebrated New York Artists, would respectfully inform the inhabitants of this place and vicinity, that they have taken and fitted up rooms for their business, and are now prepared to make pictures surpassed by none.

Large Size, Beautiful Colored, 50 Cents.  Faded Pictures restored.  All kinds of Pictures copied in the highest style of the art.  They are the inventors of the Albatus Lumin process, by which pictures can be taken equally as well in stormy as clear weather.  No one need stay away on account of clouds.  Entire satisfaction given or no charge.

They can be found for two weeks only, at Morse’s Building, Cor. Pike & Main Sts.                     N. B. The morning light is most suitable for taking pictures of children.

The second advertisement ran from April 1 to June 17, 1858.  Ambrotypes and Albatypes.  Mr. Parish, formerly of the firm of Parish & Edson, flattered by the liberal patronage received, has determined to locate permanently in this place, and has leased for this purpose the rooms occupied by them for the last two months in Morse’s building, corner Pike and Main sts., where he is prepared to take pictures surpassed by none, and at prices placing them in the reach of all.

Pictures beautifully colored and encased for 50 Cents!

Also constantly on hand an elegant variety of Fancy & Plain Cases to suit tastes the most fastidious.

Mr. Parish has ever used the best and most expensive chemicals manufactured in this country and Europe, hence those clear and brilliant pictures to be obtained only at his gallery.  Included in these is the chemical for the instantaneous production of Children’s Pictures, in which Mr. P. is unsurpassed.  Also on hand for this purpose, a full supply of patience.

This gallery is constructed on the most scientific principles, combining the sky and side light, by which are produced those soft and mellow tints and that elegant contrast of light and shade for which his pictures are so justly celebrated.

Thankful to his patrons for past favors, he hopes ever to merit a continuance of their patronage. Isaac Parish.  Morse’s Building, cor. Pike and Main sts., Port Jervis.

The third advertisement ran from June 24 to July 15, 1858.  The Up-Town Gallery.  Something New!  Albatypes and Ambrotypes!  Mr. Parish, who for the last season has received such liberal patronage from the people of this place and vicinity, would call the attention of his patrons to his new and elegant style of Picture, the Albatype, made only by him.  Those who have seen it pronounce it the finest product of the Photographic Art, combining as it does the beauty of the most elegant ivory painting, with the accuracy of the finest Ambrotype, it never fails to please, and can be seen at any angle; possessing at the same time the most brilliant tone, unsurpassed by the finest specimens of the Daguerrean Art.  The accuracy with which it can be copied makes it valuable above all other pictures, and its showing light as well as dark drapery, no less an advantage.  The disagreeable blending of white caps and light hair with the back-ground of the Ambrotype, is in this done away, presenting instead the most delightful contrast—standing out in bold relief, seemingly raised from the plate.  Their durability too is unsurpassed.

Ambrotypes and Albatypes inserted in Lockets, Breastpins, &c., on Mica Melainotypes and Nielograph material.  Constantly on hand, a fine assortment of Fancy Union, Shell and Composition cases.  Beautiful Union Cases for Family Groups.  Prices low—within the reach of all.

Do Not mistake the place—Parish’s Gallery, opposite St. John’s Brick Store, in Morse’s Building, Upper-Town.

The fourth advertisement ran from November 18, 1858 to May 12, 1859.  Notice!  Notice!!  Re-Opening of the Up Town Gallery.  Mr. Parish, after a successful summer tour through Sussex and adjacent counties of New Jersey, has returned to Port Jervis, with increased facilities for Picture taking.

Thankful for the appreciation the people have shown of his work, he hopes by the aid of a new and enlarged apparatus, Together with an entire new stock of Chemicals and all the latest improvements in the Art, to merit a continuance of their patronage.

Pictures taken at the low price of 50 cents, and beautifully colored.  Pictures taken in any weather, cloudy as well as clear.  Particular attention given to taking children’s pictures, in which Mr. P. is peculiarly successful.  Persons are invited to call and examine his work, Cases, &c.  Gallery opposite St. John’s store, up town, Port Jervis.

The fifth advertisement ran from May 19 to June 30, 1859.  Up Town Gallery.  Mr. M. Perish[1], Would respectfully inform his numerous friends and patrons of this place and vicinity, that he will remain But Three Weeks Longer in this place, and as this will be the last chance to obtain a perfect picture, he invites all who have not supplied themselves with pictures of his taking, to lose no time in doing so.

Pictures of Mr. Parish’s taking are warranted Not To Fade, and none to be found minus, those important organs, the eyes.

Mr. Parish has a new mode of copying pictures, showing a decided improvement on the original picture.  Pictures copied and enlarged to ten times their original size.  Pictures inserted in Lockets, Breastpins and Rings, of the smallest dimensions.  Remember this is The Last Chance to obtain Pictures of Mr. Parish’s taking.  Gallery, opposite St. John & Everit’s Store.   Port Jervis.

The announcement ran on July 28, 1859.  Mr. Isaac Parish, late of this village, in connection with Mr. Haynes of Newton, has located at Monticello in the ambrotype business.

Isaac Parish is not recorded in other photographic directories.

[1] Probably a typo, should be I. Parish.

Parish & Edson

1858                Morse’s Building, corner Pike & Main Streets, Port Jervis, New York.

The partnership of Parish & Edson (Isaac Parish & Edson) was recorded in one advertisement that ran from February 11 to March 25, 1858 in the Tri-State Union (Port Jervis, New York).  Ambrotypes and Albatypes.  Parish & Edson, the celebrated New York Artists, would respectfully inform the inhabitants of this place and vicinity, that they have taken and fitted up rooms for their business, and are now prepared to make pictures surpassed by none.

Large Size, Beautiful Colored, 50 Cents.  Faded Pictures restored.  All kinds of Pictures copied in the highest style of the art.  They are the inventors of the Albatus Lumin process, by which pictures can be taken equally as well in stormy as clear weather.  No one need stay away on account of clouds.  Entire satisfaction given or no charge.

They can be found for two weeks only, at Morse’s Building, Cor. Pike & Main Sts.  N. B. The morning light is most suitable for taking pictures of children.

Isaac Parish & Edson are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Paret

1859            279 Bowery, Near First Street, New York, New York.

Paret  was recorded in one advertisement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on  October 4, 1859.  Paret’s Daguerreotypes—Large Size, For 50 Cents; a true and durable picture, warranted.  Gallery, 279 Bowery, near First street, N. Y.

Paret is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as William A Paret, 297 Bowery.  After looking at modern google address it appears that the 279 Bowery address is probably a typo and that 297 Bowery is closer to First Street.

John Pardoe

1858                Address Unknown, Oneonta, New York.

1859 January 21.  The Freeman’s Journal.  (Cooperstown, New York.)  January 21, 1859, Vol. LI, No. 24, Whole No. 2,624, P. 4.

List of Premiums Awarded by the Otsego Co. at [ ? ] in 1858….Discretionary Permits….

Bolles & Smith, patent Camera-Box, dip and cash $3.                                                                          Bolles & Smith, Photographs and Ambrotypes, cash $1.                                                              J. Pardoe, oil paintings and photographs in oil, cash $2.

John Pardoe is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active as a daguerreian in Oneonta in 1859.  He is also listed in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary Of Artist in America 1584-1860.  John Pardoe, Portrait painter of NYC, who exhibited at the American Institute in 1848.  NYCD 1848-1849, as a painter.  This is possibly the same person.  The question is did he take the photographs or did he just paint them?

Mr. Pardee

1848-1849       Clinton Hotel, Lansingburgh, New York.

Mr. Pardee was listed in five announcements, the first three are from the Lansingburgh Democrat and Rensselaer County Gazette; the next two are from the Lansingburgh Democrat    (Lansingburgh, New York).  The first appeared on July 27, 1848.  Mr. Pardee, has taken rooms at the Clinton Hotel, and opened his Daguerreotype Gallery for the inspection of our citizens.  We have examined pictures of some of our citizens taken at his room, especially one of an infant 5 months old, which for beautiful accuracy, we have never seen surpassed.  He charges only one dollar for a miniature, which is but half the common price.  We hope he will do a good business.  Give him a call.

The second appeared on August 10, 1848.  Mr. Pardee, at the Clinton Hotel, takes splendid Daguerreotype Pictures.  His prices are so low, only $1 for a miniature and case, that a large number of our citizens are availing themselves of this opportunity for “catching the shadow, ere it fades.”  We would assure the public that he is [ ? ] of superior [ ? ].

The third announcement appeared on December 7, 1848.  Pardee’s Daguerreotypes.  Mr. Pardee still continues at the Clinton Hotel practicing the Daguerrian art, and producing likeness, faithful and in its highest perfection.  He takes them cheap, and the opportunity of securing a perfect facsimile of the “human face divine” of those friends you love, should not be neglected.—He may be found at any time in his room, at which place numerous specimens of “faces familiar” may be seen, and their correctness and beauty acknowledged.

The fourth announcement appeared on March 28, 1849.  Pardee still maintains his well earned reputation of being one of the best artists in the Daguerrian line.  He rooms at the Clinton Hotel, where the visitors can examine specimens of his skill.  One dollar is all it cost to “secure the shadow ere it fades.”  He takes pictures in all kinds of weather.

The fifth announcement appeared on June 28, 1849.  Reader, a word for your private ear.  If you have not yet paid Pardee a visit, and had your daguerreotype taken, you had better do so immediately.  In these Cholera times there is no knowing what may happen, and delays are dangerous.  That’s all.

This is probably Phineas Pardee, Jr.  who is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Lansingburgh in 1850-1851.

Mr. Palmer

1853                215 Washington Street, Boston, Massachusetts.

Mr. Palmer was recorded in one advertisement that ran in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript (Boston, Massachusetts) on February 26, 1853.  Daguerreotype Portrait Painting.  Photographic Portraits are taken with all the recent improvements adopted in the process in France, England and America, by Palmer & Co., 215 Washington street Boston.

Photographic Portrait Painting (sun painting) now takes its place by the side of pencil drawing.  By painting with instruments an outline of mathematical precision is obtained which can scarcely be expected with the hand; and by judicious employment of chemicals and the careful use of color, the finest tone and finish imparted to the picture.   Landscapes and Portraits are taken with equal exactness and fidelity—valuable pieces of sculpture are copied in high relief—and minute Portraits are executed for lockets, broaches, pins and rings.  Unless we are prepared to quarrel with the sun and dispute the laws of nature, we must admit that the trust and most perfect portrait may be obtained by the Daguerreotype.  For specimens see case at the door, 215 Washington St.

Mr. Palmer is not listed in other photographic directories nor was he listed in the Boston City Directory; residence section from 1851-1854.

Randolph Palmer

1841                Studio east corner of the Exchange Building, over Mr. Haight’s Jewelry Store,                               Auburn, New York.

Randolph Palmer was recorded in three advertisements and two announcement in the Auburn Journal and Advertiser (Auburn, New York).  The first advertisement was recorded on January 6, 1841.  Portrait Painting.  R. Palmer would say to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Auburn and its vicinity, that he would be happy to wait upon them in the line of his profession, at his room, Chedell’s Buildings.

As to his ability as an artist, he would leave it with connoisseurs to decide.  His portraits are always ready for inspection: let them speak for themselves.  Call and examine them.  Auburn, February 18, 1840.

The first announcement appeared on January 20, 1841.  The Daguerreotype.  By reference to the advertisement of Mr. R. Palmer in other columns, our readers will notice that he has recently fitted up his establishment so as to enable him to take likenesses, by the new and curious system of Daguerreotype.  It was our intention to have given at this time a sort of bird’s eye view of the course adopted in carrying out the rules of this new discovery;—but we shall be compelled to defer it till our next. Such of our citizens as desire a perfect miniature, will do well to give Mr. P. a call at his “glass house,” east end of Exchange Buildings—and those who desire a Portrait, will there see specimens of his skill with the pencil and brush, as large, as natural, and apparently as animated as life itself.

The second advertisement ran from January 20 to March 24, 1841.  Portraits, Miniatures, And Photographic Likenesses in the Daguerreotype Process R. Palmer, has removed his studio to the east corner of Exchange Buildings, (directly over Mr. Haight’s Jewelry Store,) within the Glass House, where he will always be found ready, and happy, to wait upon all who may desire to hand down to posterity their Phiz upon canvass, Ivory, or Silver

He is perfectly willing to be criticized upon his own productions, but thinks it unfair for critics to find fault with the Pictures which Nature paints.

The Daguerreotype paints along with the colors which the sun produces, by reflecting light upon the sitter,—the sitting for the Daguerreotype vary from 3 to 8 minutes, according to light.  The best time for taking likenesses is in a clear day from 8 A. M., to 3 P. M.—It is not necessary to have the sun shine upon the sitter.

The second announcement appeared on February 10, 1841.  Daguerreotypes.  Likenesses of this description are now taken with the greatest accuracy by Mr. Palmer, at his “glass house” at the east end of the Exchange Buildings.

“The pictures as pictures (says the N. Y. Courier, in speaking of Daguerreotypes) are superior to any other specimens of the art that we have seen, and as likenesses of the originals, there is no sort of mistake.  No one who would be flattered need sit, but the man or woman who seek a similitude of their own face and features, as exact as it is in the mirror into which they look, had better apply here.  It is not a resemblance but an absolute identity of look and appearance, that is the result.”

Mr. P. has also recently succeeded in taking by the above power some beautiful landscape views.

The third advertisement appeared on March 31, 1841.  Portrait Painting.  R. Palmer has removed his room to 89 (Beach’s Block) Genesee st., where he will be happy to attend to all business in the line of his profession.—As to his ability as an artist, he would leave it with connoisseurs to decide.  His portraits are always ready for inspection: let them speak for themselves.

The Ladies and Gentlemen of Auburn and vicinity are respectfully invited to give him a call. Auburn, March, 1841.

Randolph Palmer is not recorded in other photographic directories.  He is recorded in The New-York Historical Society’s Dictionary Of Artists In America 1584-1860 as a portrait painter working in Auburn, New York from 1839 to 1843 and also working in Albany and Seneca Falls.