Charles Graver

1857-1858       Address Unknown, Plaquemine, Louisiana.

Charles Graver was recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Southern Sentinel (Plaquemine, Louisiana).  The announcement appeared on December 12, 1857. 

Ambrotyping.—It will be seen by the card of Mr. Graver that he has arrived in our town, and proposes introducing our citizens to his beautiful art of Crystalographing and Ambrotyping.  Those who have not yet taken advantage of this beautiful art to perpetuate their own or the features of those whom they love, should not lose the present opportunity.  Mr. G. guarantees that his pictures cannot be surpassed; and he speaks with confidence which gives surety that he is a perfect master of his art.  See his card.

The advertisement ran from December 12, 1857 to January 13, 1858.  Crystalographs and Ambrotypes!  Charles Graver Has the honor to inform the citizens of Plaquemine and vicinity that he has arrived for the purpose of submitting to their respectful notice his peculiar style of taking those beautiful, mellow toned and everlasting images called Crystalographs and Ambrotypes!

The Crystalograph is a positive Photographic image, taken on glass.  It possesses a boldness of relief, a softness, a commingling of light and shade, a distinctness and delicacy of tone, which eclipses every other kind of sun drawn picture.

Any lady or gentleman having in their possession pictures taken in New Orleans, the Northern States or elsewhere, are urgently requested to bring them up to the Gallery for comparison, and if I cannot produce a picture which, for striking resemblance, elegance of position, pure natural flesh color, nice gradation of light and shade and harmony of tone, infinitely surpassing the specimen brought, no charge will be made.

All lovers of the beautiful in the Fine Arts are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens, whether they wish pictures or not.

Black silk or plaid dresses preferable to all others.

When a family is taken a large deduction will be made.      

Crystalograph copies taken from Daguerreotypes, and improved on the original.

Equally fine pictures taken in cloudy as in fine weather.

Other operators’ pictures taken over at a very low figure.

Prices varying from $2.50 to $5.00.

Parties anxious to secure pictures which cannot be excelled by Any in the United States or in Europe, are requested to call immediately, as the operator’s stay is very limited.    

Charles Graver is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Grant & Nixon

1846                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

Grant & Nixon were recorded in one announcement that appeared on August 27, in the  Washington County Journal (Union Village, New York).  Premium Daguerreotype Miniatures.  We take much pleasure in commending the Miniature Gallery of Messrs. Grant & Nixon to the attention of our citizens and the public generally.  They are located in the same building with ourself and in the room directly opposite our office, where they are daily producing some of the finest Pictures and most exact Likenesses we have ever seen.  Their Pictures are beautifully drawn out and possess a clearness, richness, life-like accuracy and brilliancy of finish we have rarely seen equaled and never surpassed! They have likenesses of several eminent public men and a great variety of splendid specimens in the Photographic Art.  Of course you will not take our word for all this, but call and see for yourselves—when, we are quite sure you will not fail to let the Operators give you a sitting of 20 or 30 seconds, just to see what a few glances of the sun beams can do.

Grant & Nixon do not appear in other photographic directories.

Gove & Widney

1851                Water Street, over the Insurance Office, Evansville, Indiana.

Gove & Widney (Gove & J. H. Widney) were mentioned in two advertisements in The Evansville Daily Journal  (Evansville, Indiana).  The first advertisement ran from August 27 to October 11, 1851.  Daguerrian Gallery.  J. H. Widney would respectfully inform the citizens of Evansville and vicinity, that he has taken the rooms formerly occupied by Gove & Widney, over the Insurance Office Water street, where he has located for the purpose of conducting his profession, and would invite citizens and visitors to call at his rooms and examine his specimens, where he will be happy to furnish those who may wish their likenesses in cases of large or small size, single or in groups, in Breastpins or Lockets, on the most reasonable terms, and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.

N. B.—Instructions given in the art, on reasonable terms.  Likenesses taken in all kinds of Weather.  [aug16.]

The second advertisement ran from November 8, 1851 to June 15, 1852.  Dobyns & Co.’S Daguerreotype Galleries.

No. 489 Main Street, Louisville, Ky.

No. 1 Fowlke’s Row, Memphis, Tenn.

Nos. 6 & 23 Camp Street, New Orleans.

Corner 4th and Chestnut sts, St. Louis, Mo.

J. T. Yearout & L. S. Lipman, of the above firm would respectfully inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of Evansville and the public generally, that they have taken Rooms on Water st., over Insurance office, and that they are permanently located at Evansville, in the Daguerrean Rooms formerly occupied by Gove & Widney, where one of them may be found at all hours of the day, ready and prepared to take Likenesses of all sizes and descriptions, to exhibit specimens of their work, sell stock, give instruction in the art and wait upon all who may favor them with a call.

N. B.—All work done by them will be warranted to give perfect satisfaction or no charge made.

Constantly on hand a full supply of Daguerreotype Stock for sale.

The above rooms are now furnished and open.  All are invited to call and examine for themselves.                                                                         

Gove & Widney are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Gove and Stone

1850                7 Main Street, Taunton, Massachusetts.

Gove and Stone (possibly William S. Gove & Gardner W. Stone) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from August 16 to August 22, 1850. In the Taunton Democrat (Taunton, Massachusetts). 

Colored Daguerreotypes.  Messrs. Gove & Stone from Boston.  Respectfully inform the inhabitants of Taunton and vicinity, that they have taken the new sky light Daguerreotype Rooms formerly occupied by H. S. Dunshee & Brother No. 7 Main St., where they will be happy to wait upon all who may be in want of good likenesses of themselves or friends, being provided with a superior German Camera and every other facility for making good pictures, and having been for a long time practically engaged in the business, sparing neither pains nor expense in availing themselves of every improvement they feel confident that they can furnish as good pictures as can be produced in the art.  Miniatures taken in any weather single or in groups, plain or colored, and neatly set in Lockets, Bracelets, in Pins, or Cases, and warranted to give satisfaction.

Likenesses of sick or deceased persons taken. 

Painted or Daguerreotype Likenesses accurately copied.

They would respectfully invite all, whether they wish to sit for their Pictures or not, to call and examine their specimens, that they may be enabled to judge for themselves.

Advertisement ran from August 16 to August 22, 1850.

Gove & Stone are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Goodhue & Son

1854                77 Westminster Street, Providence, Rhode Island.

Goodhue & Son were recorded in one advertisement that appeared on August 17, 1854 in the  Herald of the Times (Newport, Rhode Island).  Daguerreotype Pins, a fine assortment this day received and for sale at the lowest prices, by Goodhue & Son, Opticians and Jewelers at Spectacle Depot, No. 77 Westminster St., Providence. 

Goodhue & Son are not recorded in other photographic directories. 

A. T. Goodell

ND                  251 Broadway, New York, New York.

1845                Corner Thames & Mary Streets, Newport, Rhode Island.

ND-1849         North William and Chatham Streets, New York, New York.

1853-1854       Corner of J and Third, Streets, Sacramento, California.[1]

A. T. Goodell was recorded in one advertisement in the Herald of the Times (Newport, Rhode) and one article in the St. Louis and Canadian Photographer (St, Louis, Missouri).  The advertisement that ran from May 29 to July 31, 1845.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  A, T. Goodell, Late of Plumbe’s, Broadway , New York, Would respectfully inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of Newport and vicinity, that he has engaged Rooms at the corner of Thames & Mary streets, for the purpose of taking pictures by the Daguerreotype process, where may be had miniatures, single or in groups, which for beauty of color, tone and effect, can be at all ties commend themselves; and if not superior, are equal to any that have been heretofore taken, upon as favorable terms at least.  They are also inserted in breast pins, lockets, &c., at various prices.

Painted or Daguerreotype Likenesses accurately copied.

The ladies and Gentlemen of Newport are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens, if they intend sitting or not.

Taken in clear or cloudy weather.

Instructions carefully given—terms moderate.

The article appeared in the St. Louis and Canadian Photographer (St. Louis, Missouri) on March 1896, P. 114.  Our First Photographers

In reading of the recent death of the veteran photographer, M. B. Brady, in which it was claimed he was the father of photography in this country, I feel it is only justice to correct some of the statements, so I consulted Dr. A. T. Goodell, who began his career as a photographer in 1843 in this city, and obtained some facts which may interest your numerous readers.

In the year 1840‑41, a short time after Daguerre had invented the process of taking pictures bearing his name‑‑the daguerreotype‑‑John Plumbe, Jr., William H. Butler, S. Draper, James R. Chilton, and Samuel F. B. Morse, the inventor of telegraphy, opened a place at 7 Bowery to experiment in taking pictures by the Daguerre process.  They used only a side light.  It occurred to John Plumbe, Jr., that a skylight would bring about better results, and he leased the upper floors of 251 Broadway, corner of Murray street, where the Postal Telegraph building now stands, and opened Plumbe’s National Gallery, employing twelve operators and Mrs. Thomas, an artist, taking 400‑500 pictures a day at from $3 to $8 each.  At that time M. B. Brady was manufacturing daguerreotype cases at 187 Broadway.

Plumbe’s phenomenal success with the top light led many others to embark in the business, among which were Anthony, Edward & Clark, 247 Broadway, J. Gurney, 189 Broadway, and A. Bogardus, 217 Greenwich street.  J.M. Scoville started in the manufacturing of stock for galleries, and Brady still made cases, but in about 1845 or 1846 he opened a gallery at his factory, 187 Broadway.

Thus it appears that Plumbe was the first photographer in this country.

He opened galleries in all the principal cities in the United States, in London, and Paris, and made a fortune.  Dr. Goodell, who was Plumbe’s head operator, opened his own place at North William and Chatham streets, selling it out to go to California in 1849, around Cape Horn, and when he became stranded, after various ups and downs, his training with Plumbe enabled him to take charge of R. H. Vance’s gallery in Sacramento, the price for one daguerreotype being a half ounce of gold dust, worth about $8.  From the old Daguerre process, so successfully improved and enlarged by Plumbe and his operators, all of whom became prominent, grew the albumen process on glass, the collodion process, then dry plates, and so on.

Plumbe opened two galleries in Washington, one of which was in the Capitol building, and took the pictures of all the prominent men of the day.  [W. M. Chapman, in N. Y. Sun.

A. T. Goodell is recorded in other photographic directories, but the information above helps to clarify his early years.  Goodell is not listed in the New York City Directories between 1839/1840 to 1849/1850.   


[1] Pioneer Photographers Of The Far West A Biographical Dictionary, 1840-1865.

David Goff

1851                Rooms in the old Masonic Hall, Abbeville, South Carolina.

1851                Rooms at Dr. Connor’s, Cokesbury, South Carolina.

David Goff was recorded in one announcement and four advertisements, the announcement and the first three advertisements appeared in The Abbeville Banner (Abbeville, South Carolina), the fourth advertisement appeared on August 5, 1854 in the Independent Press (Abbeville, South Carolina).  The announcement appeared on April 26, 1851.  The attention of our citizens is called to the advertisement of David Goff, Esq., in another column.  We are pleased to learn from good authority, that he has made such proficiency in the art, as to rank him among the first artist in the country.

The first advertisement ran from April 26 to May 17, 1851.  Daguerreotypes.  David Goff respectfully informs the citizens of the village and the public generally that he will be in the village sometime during next week, and that he is now fully prepared to take Likenesses in all the perfection of the art.

Rooms in the old Masonic Hall.  The public are invited to call and examine his specimens.         

The second advertisement ran from May 10 to 17, 1851. Daguerreotypes.  David Goff respectfully informs the citizens and the public generally that he has arrived in the Village, and is now fully prepared to take Likenesses in all the perfection of the art.

Rooms in the old Masonic Hall.  The public are invited to call and examine his specimens.         

The third advertisement was recorded on June 21 & July 9, 1851.  David Goff, Daguerreotypist.  Cokesbury.  Has taken Rooms on Dr. Connor’s premises, and is prepared to take Daguerreotype Likenesses in all the perfection of the Art.

The citizens are invited to call and examine his specimens.

The fourth advertisement first appeared on August 5, 1854 in the Independent Press (Abbeville, South Carolina).  Town Lot for Sale.  State of South Carolina, Abbeville District.  In Equity.  John H. Wilson, Adm’r of Ann Goff, vs. Samuel Goff and David Goff} Bill to sell Real Estate.

By Order of the Court of Equity, I will sell the Goff House and Lot, described in the Bill, on sale day in September next, at Abbeville, C. H., on a credit till the first of January next.  The purchaser will give bond with surety to secure the purcase (Sic.) money.

Said lot containe (Sic.) one and a quarter acres, more or less, and is situated on the public street, adjoining lots and lands of Charles Dendy.—Costs to be paid in cash.  H. A. Jones, C. E. A. D.

Commissioner’s Office, August 3, 1854.

David Goff is recorded in other photographic directories.  The fourth advertisement might identify S. Goff as Samuel who is mentioned in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Partners with the Sun South Carolina Photographers 1840-1940 by Harvey S. Teal.

Goddard & Metcalf

1849-1850       Over J. C. Molton’s Hat Store, Woonsocket, Rhode Island.

Goddard & Metcalf (Emerson Goddard & Charles H. Metcalf) were recorded in one advertisement that was recorded on March 23, 1850 in the General Advertiser (Providence, Rhode Island).  Goddard & Metcalf, Daguerrean Artists, Woonsocket, Rhode Island.  Having made arrangements for continuing together in the Daguerrean Business, would say to the public that they are prepared to execute Likenesses in the highest perfection of the art, having every convenience and facility which observation and experience can suggest.  We have the best light for all kinds of shading, being a sky-light in connection with a North side light.  We gild by the best process, and warrant our pictures permanent.  Particular attention is called to the easy and natural expression of the eye in our Daguerreotypes. We have all the best and latest styles of settings for Daguerreotypes. 

Satisfaction Given. Instruction given for $25, and Apparatus at cost.

Ladies and gentlemen are invited to call and examine our specimens, settings, &c.

Gallery over J. C. Molton’s Hat Store, and near Harris’ High Bridge, Woonsocket.  Emerson Goddard.  Chas. H. Metcalf.  au.26.

Goddard & Metcalf are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Unfortunately no newspapers were available to reference between December 18, 1847 and March 23, 1850 and the next available issue was on January 25, 1851.  In fact only fourteen issues were available to look at in the General Advertiser between 1847-1858.  The date on the advertisement was August 26, [1849].  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does record Emerson J. Goddard active in Providence in 1849; 1855-1859.  There is no listing for Charles H. Metcalf.

Mr. Giroux

1854                Mechanics’ Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana.

1856                142 Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Mr. Giroux was recorded in three announcements and two advertisements in the partnership of Giroux & Hirsch.   The first announcement was recorded on December 27, 1854 in the New Orleans Daily Crescent (New Orleans, Louisiana).  Destructive Fire—The Mechanics Institute in Ruins.—Last evening about 6 o’clock, a fire broke out in the rear part of the basement of the Mechanics’ Institute, on the Philippa street front of University Square, and in little more than a hour’s time the splendid edifice was reduced to a pile of smoking ruins; nothing being left standing but the front and portions of the side walls…

The Repository of Arts and Sciences, kept in one of the rooms by Mr. Brocket, lost every thing—valued at about $3000.  Mr. Truehols, the portrait and picture painter, occupying another room, lost every thing.  One picture alone, of large size, which he had nearly finished entitled “The Crucifixion,” he valued at [$3000].  Mr. Giroux, the photographist, occupying the from=nt room of the floor, opposite the library, lost every thing.  He had just finished fitting up at an expenditure of $2500.  Mr. Gomes who kept a cabinet making and repairing shop on the ground floor, under Mr. Giroux’s room, also lost his all—about $1000 worth…

The second announcement (same as the first) appeared on December 27, 1854 Times-Picayune.  (New Orleans, Louisiana).  Burning of the Mechanics’ Institute.  We regret to state that this noble building, one of the city’s proudest ornaments, was destroyed by fire last evening…   

Mr. Giroux, who had just established rooms for practicing the art of photography, lost about $2,500.

The third announcement (same as the first) appeared on January 5, 1855 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Burning of the Mechanics’ Institute, at New Orleans.  [From the New Orleans Picayune, Dec. 27.]  We regret to state that this noble building, one of the city’s proudest ornaments, was destroyed by fire last evening…Mr. Giroux, who had just established rooms for practicing the art of photography, lost about $2,500.

The first advertisement was appeared on April 23,1856 in the Semi-Weekly Creole (New Orleans, Louisiana).  Heliographic Gallery.  Portraits Drawn in a few Seconds by the Attraction of the Light.  Giroux & Hirsch. No. 142 Canal street, between Bourbon and Dauphin streets.

Messrs. Giroux & Hirsch, Heliographs, Informs the public that their Saloon and Studio are now opened, at 142 Canal street, where visitors will be gladly received.

They avail themselves of this opportunity to call the attention of amateurs to their improvement, in New Orleans to Heliographic Portraits, and present, to be compared with what has been done heretofore in the line, the proof Portraits exhibited in their gallery.

Messrs. G. & H. announce, besides, that with a view to the popularity of their art, the prices of their Portraits, whether black or colored, will be very moderate.  mh5.

The second advertisement (same as the first) was recorded July 1 to September 12, 1856 in the   New Orleans Daily Creole (New Orleans, Louisiana).  Heliographic Gallery.  Portraits Drawn in a few Seconds by the Attraction of the Light.  Giroux & Hirsch. No. 142 Canal street, between Bourbon and Dauphin streets.

Messrs. Giroux & Hirsch, Heliographs, Informs the public that their Saloon and Studio are now opened, at 142 Canal street, where visitors will be gladly received.

They avail themselves of this opportunity to call the attention of amateurs to their improvement, in New Orleans to Heliographic Portraits, and present, to be compared with what has been done heretofore in the line, the proof Portraits exhibited in their gallery.

Messrs. G. & H. announce, besides, that with a view to the popularity of their art, the prices of their Portraits, whether black or colored, will be very moderate.  mh5.

Mr. Giroux is recorded in other directories as being in the partnership only.  First names are not known at this time.  There is an advertisement for Leon Giroux, 142 Canal Street for Fancy Shoes the same address as the partnership.  It is unknown if this is the same person.  No additional advertisements have been located at this time for Hirsch.  Hirsch is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as a “painter of photographs” which led me into looking at The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists In America 1564-1860.  There is one listing for Siegfried Hirsch, miniature and portrait painted who was active in New York City as a miniature painter from 1851-1855; then he went to Charleston, South Carolina; and by 1857 he was back in New York City. It is also unknown if he is the same person.

M. G. Gilpatrics

1859                New Building, Over Jewelry Store and Clothing Store, Groton Junction, Massachusetts.

M. G. Gilpatrics was recorded in one advertisement that ran from September 29 to December 29,  1859 in the  Railroad Mercury (Groton, Massachusetts).  New Ambrotype Rooms, In the New Building, over the Jewelry Store and Clothing Store, opposite the Depots, Groton Junction, Ms. M. G. Gilpatrics.  Ambrotype And Melaneotypes Rooms.  Particular attention paid to copying and taking likenesses of sick and deceased persons.

M. G. Gilpatrics is not recorded in other photographic directories.