All posts by pioneeramericanphotographers

Mr. Long

1840                Hall of The Augusta House, Augusta, Maine.

Mr. Long was recorded in one announcement that appeared on June 13, 1840 in the Gospel Banner (Augusta, Maine).  The Daguerreotype.  Mr. Long, a competent lecturer, is in this place, and delivered a lecture and gave an exhibition on the Daguerreotype art at the Hall of the Augusta House on Monday last.  In consequence of a misunderstanding amongst our citizens, the day not being supposed to be sufficiently pleasant for the exhibition, the attendance was small.  He proposes to repeat the lecture and exhibition at the same place, this (Saturday) P. M. at 2 o’clock.  Tickets 25 cents each.  Those who were present on Monday are invited to be present again at that time gratuitously.

We have had some conversation with Mr. Long and are satisfied that his lecture must be highly interesting and valuable, as exhibiting many important facts in natural Philosophy.  The pictures taken are to the very life.  Nothing can be so perfect.  Even images impressed upon the plate, which are, in the distance, to small to be minutely examined by the naked eye, will, by an application of the microscope, be enlarged and then every minute feature of the original will be distinctly seen .  Nearer objects, of course, appear perfect.  The exhibition is worthy of patronage.

Mr. Long (first name is unknown) is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Maine.

Locke

1847                First building west of the Congregational Church, Litchfield, Connecticut.

Locke of the partnership of Martin & Locke was recorded in one announcement and one advertisement, he was also mentioned in one advertisement, and one advertisement that singles that Locke left the partnership in the Litchfield, Enquirer (Litchfield, Connecticut). The first announcement appeared on June 3, 1847.  Daguerreotypes.—We cordially invite the attention of our readers to the advertisement of Messrs. Martin & Locke, Daguerreotypist, 1st door west of the Congregational Church.  All who desire to obtain elegant and correct miniatures of themselves or their friends, will do well to avail themselves of the opportunity now presented.  A far more exact likeness can now be obtained for $2, than could have been procured for $30 ten years ago.

The first advertisement ran from June 3 to 17, 1847.  Colored Photographic Likenesses.  Messrs. Martin & Locke Will remain in this place for a short time, and will execute Photographic Likenesses by the Daguerreotype process, in a superior stye, possessing all the Colors of Life and guaranteed to give satisfaction.

Having made themselves acquainted with all the latest improvements in the Art, they are prepared (with the use of a different and superior article of Chemicals and gilding, by which, the impression receives a perfectly clear and natural appearance, and is made permanent upon the plate,) to do work which shall compare with any done in the cities.  Our mode of operating being the same as that of the principal Galleries in New York and Boston, and entirely different from those who preceded us. 

They would say to those who have pictures taken by the old method which are either faded out, or unlifelike in color, &c., that they will take them in Exchange For New Ones, or find a new plate and put them up into the cases at reasonable prices.

Groups of from two to six taken with all the distinctness of a single picture.

Likenesses of children taken with much success.  Also, Likenesses taken from Family Portraits which look more natural and lifelike than the Painting.

Ladies and Gentlemen are solicited to call and examine specimens, and sit for their Likenesses, if they choose, by way of experiment.

Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather.  Rooms 1st building west of the Congregational Church.

The second advertisement is for Martin by himself that ran on June 17 & 24, 1847. Martin’s Premium Colored Daguerreotypes.  Rooms in the first building west of the congregational Church. 

The third advertisement mentioned Locke appeared on June 24, 1847.  Colored Photographic Likenesses.  Martin’s Formerly Messrs. Martin & Locke Will remain in this place for a short time, and will execute Photographic Likenesses by the Daguerreotype process, in a superior stye, possessing all the Colors of Life and guaranteed to give satisfaction.

Having made themselves acquainted with all the latest improvements in the Art, they are prepared (with the use of a different and superior article of Chemicals and gilding, by which, the impression receives a perfectly clear and natural appearance, and is made permanent upon the plate,) to do work which shall compare with any done in the cities.  Our mode of operating being the same as that of the principal Galleries in New York and Boston, and entirely different from those who preceded us. 

They would say to those who have pictures taken by the old method which are either faded out, or unlifelike in color, &c., that they will take them in Exchange For New Ones, or find a new plate and put them up into the cases at reasonable prices.

Groups of from two to six taken with all the distinctness of a single picture.

Likenesses of children taken with much success.  Also, Likenesses taken from Family Portraits which look more natural and lifelike than the Painting.

Ladies and Gentlemen are solicited to call and examine specimens, and sit for their Likenesses, if they choose, by way of experiment.

Likenesses taken in all kinds of weather.  Rooms 1st building west of the Congregational Church.

Locke (first name unknown) is not recorded in other photographic directories.

John Lewis

1851                142 Chatham, New York, New York[1]

1855                Chatham Street, New York, New York.

John Lewis was recorded in the 1851/1852 New York City Directory.  Daguerreotypes—142 Chatham—H-28 Eldridge.  Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was not listed in the 1852/1853 directory—Published by John Doggett; also not listed in the following directories 1853/1854—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1854/1855—Published by John Fowler Trow; 1855/1856—Published by John Fowler Trow; and the 1856/1857—Published by John Fowler Trow.

He was also recorded in one announcement that appeared on October 5, 1855 in the Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D. C.)  Distressing Occurrence—At New York, on Tuesday, Coroner Kidder was called to hold an inquest upon the body of the wife of Mr. John Lewis, who came to her death under the following circumstances:  Mr. Lewis her husband, had for some time been ill with fever , and occasionally delirious.  On Monday, during one of these spells, he became unmanageable, and persisted in jumping out of the window of his room, which was on  the third floor.  No one but his wife happened to be present at the time, his mother, who resides with them, being down stairs.  His wife, who was a small delicate woman, tried every means in her power to keep him quite, but he, becoming perfectly frantic, made tor the rear window.  She seized him and endeavored to draw him back, when he suddenly leaped through the sash and both man and woman were dashed upon the pavement below, a distance of about twenty-five feet.  Mrs. Lewis struck her head upon the door-step and was instantly killed.  Mr. Lewis was seriously injured, and now lies at the city hospital in a precarious condition.  He is a daguerreotypist, doing business in Chatham street.

John Lewis is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City from 1851 to 1853.


[1] 1851/1852 New York City Directory.

Theodore Lessey

1859                534 Broadway, New York, New York.

Theodore Lessey were recorded in two advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on September 3, 1859.  America In The Stereoscope.  A series of American Scenery, Photographed And Published By The London Stereoscopic Company.  Theodore Lessey, 534 Broadway, Manager of the United States Depot.

The second appeared on September 5, 1859.  American Scenery.—The London Stereoscopic Company.  The finest views of American Scenery are those photographed and published by the London Stereoscopic Company, who supply their depot in New York by every steamer with all kinds of stereoscopic groups and views, plain, colored and illuminated.  Stereoscopes of every variety, and at prices ranging from 50c. upwards.  Manager, Theo.  Lessey, 534 Broadway, New York.

Theodore Lessey is not record in other photographic directories.

William Leisenring

185-1856         Over Kauffman & Whitmore’s Store, Mount Pleasant, Iowa.

William Leisenring was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on February 14, 1856 in the  Mount Pleasant Observer (Mount Pleasant, Iowa).  Cutting’s Ambrotypes!  Or Pictures In Glass, By William Leisenring, at his old stand on the 3d floor of Kauffman & Whitmore’s store on the west side of the public square.

Having bought the right of Henry county, he is prepared to take the beautiful and Never Changing pictures in glass which are rapidly taking the place of Daguerreotypes they are a positive picture, showing the person without reversing.  They are beautiful in tone, bold and clear in effect.  The Ambrotype is taken on the best plate glass; an indestructible cement is then put upon it and another glass of the same size pressed upon it.  The cement soon hardens, and the two glasses become in effect one, with the picture in the centre [as] though it were in solid glass.  Clear days are the best for children.  Instructions given in the Art either in Daguerreotype or Ambrotype, or both.

Mr. Leisenring will be found at [his] rooms from 8½ o’clock A. M. till 4 P. M.  Wm. Leisenring.  Dec. 27’55.

William Leisenring is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1859-1860 in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.  Also listed in Pioneer Photographers From The Mississippi To The Continental Divide A Biographical Dictionary, 1839-1865.

Leisenring & Eckman

1855                Rooms above Friling & Grant’s Store, Sunbury, Pennsylvania.

Leisenring & Eckman (J. P. Leisenring & J. K. Eckman) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from April 21 to July 7, 1855 in the Sunbury American (Sunbury, Pennsylvania).  Daguerreotypes.  J. P. Leisenring & J. K. Eckman of Danville, respectfully announce to the ladies and gentlemen of Sunbury and vicinity, that they have opened Daguerrean rooms above Friling & Grant’s Store, in Sunbury, where they are ready to accommodate those who may favor them with a call, with beautiful and life-like miniatures.

All who desire miniatures will do well to call early and secure their pictures, as we know not what  day may bring forth.

Then hasten to our rooms, all ye people,

Before you have reason to grieve;

The cost you will find but little,        

And to satisfaction we’ll give.

Leisenring & Eckman are not recorded in other photographic directories as being active as partners.  J. P. Leisenring is recorded in Danville in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 and in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  J. K. Eckman is not recorded.  Using modern roads the distance between Sunbury and Danville, Pennsylvania is 13.7 miles.  

Augustus Le Plongeon

1853                Address Unknown, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Augustus Le Plongeon was recorded in one advertisement that ran from May 7 to June 4 in The Polynesian (Honolulu, Hawaii).  Miniatures and Views on Paper, by the Calotype process.  Augustus Le Plongeon, pupil of the celebrated Artist, William Collie, of England, begs to inform the citizens of Honolulu and vicinity, that he is prepared to take miniatures and views by this new process.  Such miniatures or views can be sent to any part of the world by letter, without injuring.

Mr. Le Plongeon can be found at his residence from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M., at the house lately occupied by Capt. Newell.

Instructions given in the art.  Reference to Mr. A. P. Everett.

Augustus Le Plongeon is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Honolulu, Hawaii. Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list him in San Francisco, California between 1854-1861.

George A. B. Lazell

1847                Address Unknown, Columbus, Ohio.

George A. B. Lazell was recorded in two announcements.  The first appeared on January 4, 1857 in the Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio).  Daguerreotype views of the Flood.  Geo. A. B. Lazell, Esq., of this city, has just shown us nine different daguerreotype views of the flood, taken at and near the Columbus bridge, and at different stages of the destruction of the waters.  They are now being exhibited in the State House, and are attracting much curiosity.  They are splendid views, indeed.

The second appeared on January 13, 1847 in The Daily Chronotype (Boston, Massachusetts

Lazell, Daguerreotypist of Columbus, took nine different views of the flood from Columbus bridge, at the different stages of the destruction by the waters.  The views are in the State House.—Cin. Morning Signal.

George A. B. Lazell is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Lang

1852                Address Unknown, Gardiner, Maine.

Mr. Lang was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on December 23, 1852 in the Eastern Times (Bath, Maine).  Fire In Gardiner.—Mr. Morrill, route agent on the Kennebec and Portland Railroad, informs us that early on Saturday morning, a fire broke out in Gardiner, in the store  (directly over the post office) occupied by Mr. Stone, and owned by Mr. Richards of the firm Richards & Hopkins.  The store and goods were badly damaged.  The post office was saved by great exertions, although every thing was removed from it.  Among these who were burned out, are Mr. Lang, daguerreotype artist; Mr. Brown, barber, and Dr. Whitmore.  Damage about $2000.

Mr. Mr. Lang, is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Gardiner, Maine.  It is possible that this is L. Lang who was active in Portland, Maine from 1849 to 1851.

Mrs. E. E. Lamson

1859                91 Middle Street, Portland, Maine.

Mrs. E. E. Lamson appeared in one advertisement that was recorded on July 16, 1859 in the  Portland Daily Advertiser (Portland, Maine).  Mrs. E. E. Lamson, Artist, From Boston, Would respectfully inform the citizens of Portland and vicinity, that having had several years’ experience in the art of Finishing Photographs in India Ink, Oil and Water-Colors.

Would say to all lovers of art, that she would be happy to receive a share of their patronage, and those desiring instruction in the same, would do well to give her an early call at B. F. Smith’s Rooms, Middle Street, where Specimens can be seen.

Likenesses warranted to be kept unchanged. 

Mrs. E. E. Lamson is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Side note only one issue of this newspaper was available for 1859.