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Miller, McClelland & McEachran

1853                Sixth Avenue, New York, New York.

Miller, McClelland & McEachran appeared in on May 25, 1853 in an announcement in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Communicated.—Mr. Editor, In Paying A Visit to the Crystal Palace a few days since, we excepted an invitation to examine the mammoth daguerrean saloon of Messrs. Miller, McClelland & McEachran, located on the Sixth avenue, immediately opposite the Crystal Palace.  The whole interior, the magnificence, an entire arrangements for the transfer of absolute humanity upon perfect, durable, and life resembling reflections, are such as cannot but inspire every visitor and patron with unhesitating confidence and satisfaction.  The visiting community will not wonder at this, when they are apprised of the fact that the whole operating department is under the immediate supervision of Prof. J. C. Law, whose artistic talent and thorough knowledge of the daguerrean art is not only proverbial among artisans of celebrity, but admitted by the general public.  The above named establishment, with its elegant apartments, important modern improvements and close proximity to the Palace for exhibiting the industry of the world, must command the presence of visitors, whose patronage will be an unavoidable consequence.  We must not omit to say, that the very gentlemanly bearing of all connected with the establishment, besides warranting well executed and perfect pictures, at once entitled them to the cordial support of all classes.  Every facility, we learn, will be in readiness to take the daguerreotypes of distinguished visitors of our own and foreign countries, during the approaching exhibition.  Call, see, and admire.  Visitors.

Miller, McClelland & McEachran James and David Miller are recorded in other photographic directories. McClelland & McEachran are not recorded in other directories as being active in New York.

Charles Miller

1856-1857       Rooms opposite the Post Office, Brattleboro, Vermont.                                        1858-1859       147½ Church Street, Burlington, Vermont.

Charles Miller was recorded in seven advertisements and nine announcements.  The first advertisement ran from December 6, 1856 to March 7, 1857 in the Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, Vermont).  New Ambrotype Rooms.  The Subscriber Would Respectfully Give notice to the people of Brattleboro and vicinity, that he has fitted up Rooms Opposite The Post Office, where he intends practicing the above Art in all its various branches.

The Ambrotype Is vastly superior, in every point of view, to the Daguerreotype; the image being taken on a transparent plate instead of a polished reflector, has the effect of softening and diffusing the light through the whole, making a Beautiful And Harmonious Picture, presenting none of that shifting and mirror-like appearance always identical in the latter.  By this process, also, it requires only about one-third as long exposure in the Camera as the Daguerreotype,—so that likenesses of children can be taken with almost absolute certainty.

All are invited to call and examine specimens.  Although all may not wish Pictures, I would be most happy to receive calls from any one at any time.  Charles Miller.

The second advertisement ran from June 18 to August 20, 1858 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).

Song Of The Sun-Picture.                                                                                                                                  With old and young, with belle and beau,                                                                                                      Miller’s Saloon is all the go;                                                                                                                                    For why?  his picture can’t be beat                                                                                                                    AT ANY “Art Gallery” on Church street.

They are all made with double glass,                                                                                                                And warranted through all time to last;                                                                                                          They will not fade, they will not spot,—                                                                                                        There’s not a poor one in the lot.

His Sphereotype is something new,                                                                                                             For which he has the Patent, too;                                                                                                                        Look in as you go up the street,                                                                                                                      You ne’er saw any thing so neat;

And Photographs, with light and shade,                                                                                                          In all their beauties—there are made                                                                                                                 By process new; and all around                                                                                                                        Say that they are the best to be found.

Ask the first passer-by you meet                                                                                                                        About his Ambrotypes, complete;                                                                                                                    You’ll find their finish, depth and tone                                                                                                      Equaled by few, excelled by none.

His rooms arranged with taste and care                                                                                                    But for one thing, most pleasant are;                                                                                                                With customers they’re crowed tight                                                                                                              From six at morn, till six at night.

Then haste to Miller’s tis the place                                                                                                                    For Brother’s or Sister’s face,                                                                                                                            Uncle’s or Aunt’s, or Ma’s or Pa’s                                                                                                                Cousin’s or dearest “ye ken wha’s.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              On Children of each age and size,                                                                                                                Miller’s entitled to the prize;                                                                                                                              So hurry up the little creatures                                                                                                                        One second, and he’ll “take off” their features.

Hasten, then while you have a day,                                                                                                                    To Miller—suffer no delay;                                                                                                                                    Secure, by Miller’s skill portrayed,                                                                                                                    A Shadow” ere the substance fade.

The first announcement appeared on August 13, 1858 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  Photograph of the Allen Monument.—Mr. Miller, of the firm of Wells, Miller & Co. of this place, has just brought us a beautiful photograph of the Ethan Allen Monument.  It gives a view of the monument, as seen from the entrance to the yard, with its surrounding of tombstones and trees.  The effect is uncommonly fine.  We think it fully equal to the best samples of the photographic art which we have seen from any artist whatever.  The monument itself is a credit to the state, and the representation of it is a credit to the photographer.  Mr. Miller furnishes copies at a very available price.

The second announcement appeared on September 24, 1858 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  The State Fair…Floral Hall…Charles Miller, of 147½ Church street, displayed a large number of his fine Sphereotypes and Photographs, both plain and in India Ink and colors, which attracted much deserved attention and admiration.

The third announcement appeared on September 24, 1858 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  State Fair…Award of Premiums…Floral Hall…Chas. Miller, Burlington, India Ink Photographs,  $5 00.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 24, 1858 in the Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, Vermont).  Eighth Annual Exhibition of the Vermont Agricultural Society.  The Eighth Annual Fair of the Vermont State Agricultural Society was held at Burlington, on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of last week….Premiums Awarded….Floral Hall…

A. F. Styles, St. Albans, Photographs in Water colors, and Ambrotypes 5.00                                  C. L. Howe, Brattleboro, Photographs  5.00                                                                                                    Chas. Miller, Burlington, India Ink Photographs   5.00

The fifth announcement appeared on September 30, 1858 in the Green-Mountain Freeman (Montpelier, Vermont).  List Of Premiums, Vermont State Fair, September 1858.….Floral Hall…

A. C. Styles, St. Albans, Photographs in Water colors, and Ambrotypes 5.00                                  C. L. Howe, Brattleboro, Photographs  5.00                                                                                          Chas. Miller, Burlington, India Ink Photographs  5.00

The third advertisement ran from November 5, 1858 to May 27, 1859 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  Chittenden County Picture Gallery.  Cha’s. Miller, [Successor to T. M. Parker.]  Patent Sphereotype, Patent Ambrotype, Melainotype, Lettergraphs, Photographs, Plain, In Oil or India Ink.  Pictures made as cheap as in any place in Vermont and Far Better.

Please remember the place, 147½ Church Street, Burlington, Vt.,

The sixth announcement appeared on November 12, 1858 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  Likeness.—Miller is getting up some beautiful and lifelike Photographs, colored in oil, about these days.  They are fully equal to city work, as are also his Indian Ink and plain photographs.  If you doubt, drop in at 147½ Church Street and examine specimens.

The fourth advertisement ran from May 27 to June 24, 1859 in the Burlington Free Press  (Burlington, Vermont).  Stereoscopes And Stereoscopic Pictures.  These beautiful and attractive Ornaments for the Parlor or Library Table, may be found at less than City Prices, at the Daguerreian Rooms of the subscriber, on Church Street.

Just Received—a fresh supply of Stereoscopic Pictures, comprising landscapes and objects of interest in Europe, Groups and In-door Scenes, in great variety, both plain and colored.  Charles Miller, Chittenden County Daguerreian Gallery, 147½ Church Street.  Burlington, May 19.

The fifth advertisement was recorded on  June 17,1859 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  June 17, 1859.  A fresh lot of Stereoscope Slides just received at Miller’s.  May 31.

The sixth advertisement ran from June 24 to November 25, 1849 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  A Dozen of nice Photographs for five dollars at Miller’s.  May 31.

The seventh announcement appeared on  September 16, 1859 in the Burlington Free Press  (Burlington, Vermont).  The State Fair…Floral Hall…Charles Miller of Burlington, exhibits Photographs in a great variety—of Miller’s plain Photographs and Sphereotypes, we have often had occasion to speak.  They are hard to beat.  A photograph of J. B. Wheeler, Esq., finished in India Ink, is fully equal to any thing of the kind wherever seen.  Some of the Photographs finished in Oil, exhibited by Mr. Miller, are striking likenesses and pleasing pictures.

The eighth announcement appeared on September 23, 1859 in the Burlington Free Press  (Burlington, Vermont).  The State Fair…Photographs.  The committee assign the highest place of honor to the plain and colored photographs exhibited by Mr. Charles Miller, of Burlington.  They show uncommon excellence.  A specimen or two of sphereotypes are also deserving of an honorable mention.

The ninth announcement appeared on September 24, 1859 in the Vermont Phoenix (Brattleboro, Vermont).  Ninth Annual Fair of the Vermont State Agricultural Society.  In accordance with arrangements effected last year, the ninth annual Fair of the Vermont State Agricultural Society was held at Burlington on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th days of September, inst, on the grounds occupied by the Society in 1856 and again in 1858….Premiums Awarded…Floral Hall…

C. Miller, Burlington, Photographs, 1st premium diploma & 5.00                                                        A. F. Styles, Burlington, Photographs, 2nd premium diploma & 3.00

The seventh advertisement ran from December 3 to 30, 1859 in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  Pictures!  Pictures!  The subscriber has just returned from market with the largest stock of Daguerrian Goods, Cases, Frames &c., ever brought into the Town of Burlington.  It comprises Oval Frames in rich gilt and ornamental mouldings; black and gold ditto; passe partouts and miniature cases of all approved kinds, including several new and beautiful styles, all eminently suitable for framing and encasing Miller’s Unrivalled Photographs and Sphereotypes, which are taken as usual at his Gallery, 147 Church St.

N. B.—Daguerrean Artist supplied with stock and chemicals at wholesale rates, as low as can be bought in the cities. Charles Miller. Burlington

Charles Miller is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Burlington, Vermont in 1859-1860.

Miller Brothers

1854                Corner First and South Seventh, Williamsburg, New York.

Miller Brothers were recorded in three advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on October 26, 1854.  Elegant Daguerreotype Establishment For sale.—The subscriber offers for sale at a great bargain, the most beautiful daguerrean rooms in Williamsburg, located in the most central and public part of the city.  The finishing and embellishment of the rooms will favorably compare with the best Broadway establishments, there being a splendid gallery of the celebrities of Europe and America, all handsomely framed, with everything requisite for caring on the business.  Price $2,000.  Apply to Russell W. Westcott, 72 Eighth avenue, New York.

The second advertisement appeared on November 1, 1854.  For sale—A Daguerrean Gallery, The Best location in Williamsburg, fitted up in fine style, long lease and cheap rent, will be sold for half its value.  Apply on the premises, over the Farmers’ and Citizens’ Bank, corner of First and South Seventh streets, Williamsburg.  Miller Brothers.

The third advertisement appeared on December 19, 1854.  Russell W. Westcott, Auctioneer.—Elegant daguerreotype establishment at auction on Wednesday, Dec. 20, at 11 o’clock, on the corner of First and South Seventh streets, Williamsburg, over the Farmers’ and Citizens’ Bank.  Splendid location.  The rooms are gorgeously furnished—velvet carpets, rosewood chairs, marble top chairs, writing desk, show cases, &c.; with over 250 European and American portraits, including Shakspeare’s Seven Ages, all richly framed, full sized cameras, and everything in fine order for carrying on the business; with five year lease from May next, at a low rent.  The rooms can be examined at any time previous to the sale, which will be peremptory, rain or shine.

Miller Brothers are not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in 1854 on First and South Seventh Streets, Williamsburg.  William H. Miller is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in 1854 over the Farmers’ and Citizens’ Bank, and is likely one of the brothers, but no reference to who the other brother is.  Craig does reference J. & D. (James & David) Miller in 1854-1855 at 687 6th Avenue, New York City.

C. L. Middlebrook

1846                Address Unknown, Norfolk, Virginia.                                                                            1846                Address Unknown, Petersburgh, Virginia.

C. L. Middlebrook was mentioned in an article that appeared on August 4, 1846 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  At Norfolk…We had a grand ball last evening at the hotel, which was crowded to excess. The officers and belles danced with considerable spirit and animation, and seemed to enjoy themselves a good deal.  The band from the fort performed, and were led by W. E. Bloomfield, formerly of the New York brass band…We have here a branch of Plumb’s Daguerreotype establishment, under the management of Mr. C. L. Middlebrook, who does a good business here and at Petersburgh.  The idea is a very good one, too, for those young beaux who loose their hearts, if they cannot get the original, can be supplied with an excellent copy by Mr. M., and thus afford a temporarily relief to the victim of unrequited love in these “diggings.”

C. L. Middlebrook  is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Both Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Photographers In Virginia A Checklist by Louis Ginsberg list a C. S. Middlebrook in Petersburg.  It is possibly they are the same person.

J. S. Meyer

1859                Address Unknown, New York, New York.

J. S. Meyer was recorded in two advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York). The first advertisement appeared on January 10, 1859. A Daguerreotypist And Photographer wishes employment.  Apply at J. S. Meyer’s gallery, 138 Canal st.

The second advertisement appeared on October 12, 1859.  A Good Photographer And Daguerreotypist wishes employment in or out of the city.  Inquire of Mr. J. Meyer, 349 Canal street.

J. S. Meyer is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Metropolitan Daguerrian Rooms

1852                603 Broadway, New York, New York.

Metropolitan Daguerrian Rooms were recorded in five advertisements.   The first advertisement appeared on October 20, 1852 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Metropolitan Daguerrian Rooms, No. 603 Broadway.—The public would do well to call as above, and see the fine Daguerreotypes there taken.  They are pronounced perfection itself.  Daguerreotypes of every kind taken in the first style of art.

The second advertisement appeared on October 20, 1852 The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Metropolitan Daguerrian Rooms, No. 603 Broadway.—The public would do well to call as above, and witness the splendid Daguerreotypes in oil there taken.  For accuracy of portraiture they are perfection itself.  The most skillful operators in the profession are constantly employed, and you may depend upon having a good picture.

The third advertisement appeared on October 23,  1852 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Sunbeam Painting.—Call in and see the superb specimens at the Metropolitan daguerrean rooms, No. 603 Broadway.  Those who are fit to call as above, are assured of the certainty of obtaining a good picture,  The daguerreotypes in oil, taken at this place, are much admired, having all the boldness as well as softness of an oil painting, or canvas.

The fourth advertisement appeared on November 2, 1852 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Daguerreotypes in Oil, of the highest finish and surface.  Pictures on Ivory in water colors, for lockets and broaches, of all sizes.  Also, daguerreotypes on silver, colored in every style of art, may be obtained at the Metropolitan Gallery, 603 Broadway, between Prince and Houston streets.  N. B.—Studios on the first floor.

The fifth advertisement appeared on  November 10, 1852 in The New York Herald (New York, New York). Daguerreotypes of Deceased Persons taken at short notice.—An artist of great experience will attend the arrangements of attitude, light, shade, and cast of draperies, securing perfection for the painter and draftsman.  Daguerreotypes in oil or otherwise, to suit applicants at the Metropolitan Gallery.  633 Broadway, near Houston street.

Metropolitan Daguerrian Rooms are not listed in other photographic directories.

Mr. Metcalf

1852-1854       Rooms 77 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

Mr. Metcalf was mentioned in an advertisement and announcement in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  The advertisement ran on April 2 and 3, 1852.  More New Pictures At Whitehurst’s.—Mr. Metcalf has just returned from Washington, where he has been engaged the past week in obtaining likenesses of prominent individuals, expressly for exhibition in this Gallery.  Among them are those of Gen. Winfield Scott, of the U. S. A., Gen. Gonzalez de la Vega, of Mexico, Col. Benj. McCulloch, of Texas Rangers, Hon. Lewis Cass, of Michigan, Hon. Judge Butler, of S. C., Hon. Judge McLane, of Ohio, Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, Ole Bull, Violinist, Miss Julia Dean, Actress, Miss Grace Greenwood, Authoress.  The public are respectfully invited to call and examine these specimens.  J. H. Whitehurst.

The announcement appeared on June 13, 1854.  Daguerreotyping.—Mr. Daniel Bendann, an operator at Whitehurst’s Daguerrean Gallery in this city, has shown us some very beautiful specimens of his art, in some views, taken by himself, of the handsome residence of Mr. Stewart, on Brook Avenue.  The beautiful Mansion, embowered in a grove; the family group gathered upon the porch; the horses and carriage seen, at a little distance, in the shade of the trees, all are the very counterpart of life.  Mr. Bendann deserves great credit for this work.  He is a young artist, who has been for several years associated with the accomplished Mr. Metcalf, the principal operator in Whitehurst’s gallery.  He bids fair to be an ornament to his profession.

Mr. Metcalf is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Richmond, Virginia  in 1853 without a business address.

Mr. Mershon

1851                Address Unknown, Wilkinson, Mississippi.                                                                  1851                Address Unknown, Woodville, Mississippi.

Mr. Mershon is mentioned in an advertisement that ran from September 16 to 23, 1851 The Woodville Republican (Woodville, Mississippi).  Daguerreotype Pictures.  Mr. Wm. L. Jewell, assisted by Mr. Mershon, respectfully informs the citizens of Wilkinson and surrounding counties that they will start out on a travelling tour on Monday, 14th September, for a short time, in this part of the State, for the purpose of affording all those who may wish to obtain pictures of the above character an opportunity of so doing.  They use one of the best instruments in the United States, the new method, and latest improvements.  Mr. Jewell, having practiced under the best artist, and followed the business for the last three years, he pledges himself to render entire satisfaction.

Persons within a distance of fifty miles, wishing to have portraits of their families taken, by addressing a few lines to that effect to him at Woodville will be waited upon as soon as possible.

He will open his rooms in Woodville about the 1st of October.

Mr. Mershon is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Merry

1850                Rooms over Mr. Lutz’s Drug Store, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.                            1850                Rooms in M’Faddin’s Brick Building, nearly opposite Sheller’s Store,                                                  Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Mr. Merry was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements.  The first announcement appeared on April 18, 1850 in The Star of the North (Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania).  Pictures.—We invite attention to the advertisement of Mr. Merry in another column.  Every body should get a correct likeness of his friends, and while you are at it, return your own fac-smile to them.  These tokens are the most valuable of gifts.  If you are yet young it may be well to suggest that your likeness at this particular time will be quite as good looking as you could expect it to be hereafter, Mr. Merry can attend to you, and has a good apparatus.  His room is over Mr. Lutz’s Drug Store.

The first advertisement ran from April 18 to May 2, 1850 in The Star of the North (Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania).  Daguerrian Gallery.  Mr. Merry would respectfully inform the public that he has taken Rooms over the Drug Store of Mr. Lutz, where he is prepared to take Daguerreotype Likenesses, In the latest Boston style, with or without colors, well put up in the best quality of Morocco cases, and warranted not to fade or change by age.

Ladies and gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens’.  Children who are old enough to keep still 2 to 5 seconds, can be taken as well as older persons.  Call soon or you will be too late, and remember that he takes as good pictures in clear, as in cloudy Weather.

The second advertisement ran from June 5 to July 17, 1850 in the Lewisburg Chronicle (Lewisburg, Pennsylvania).  Daguerrian Gallery.  Mr. Merry would respectfully inform the public, that he has taken rooms in M’Faddin’s brick building, nearly opposite Sheller’s Store, where he is prepared to take Daguerreotype Likenesses in the latest and most approved style.  Mr. Merry pledges himself to make his work equal to that of the best City artists.

He has all the latest improvements, some of which he has added to the art, and among these is a Wheel Buff, of peculiar construction, by which he is enabled to obtain a higher polish, and thereby give a more brilliant and life-like tone to his pictures.

Mr. Merry, by long practice and close attention to the art, is enabled to show the Variegated Eye, be it light or dark, with all the beauty and brilliancy of life itself; and it is in this most essential point, that more artist fail than in any other.

Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens.  Children are taken in from three to five minutes.  And remember, as good Pictures are taken in cloudy as in clear weather, tho’ for small children a clear day is recommended

The announcement appeared on June 19, 1850 in the Lewisburg Chronicle (Lewisburg, Pennsylvania).  Daguerreotypes.  Out of countenance we are this morning, and, for the first time in our life, represented by proxy.  But our phiz was captured by no common artist—no less a personage than his blazing majesty old Sol, under the supervision of his accomplished ‘aid,’ Lieut. Col. Merry, who holds forth in the second story of the new brick building opposite Sheller’s Store.  Our counterfeit presentment’ is before us at the present writing, propped up against the inkstand, looking quite modest for a ‘limb of the law,’ (abashed, no doubt, by the presence of the original,) and presents a sedateness and gravity, befitting the prodigious responsibilities that rest upon the shoulders of a country editor.  Our devil was of the opinion it looked more like us than we do our-self; but he discovered his mistake on calling for ‘copy.’

—We advise all the good people within a day’s journey of Lewisburg, who place any value upon the likeness of themselves or their friends, to call at Mr. Merry’s rooms within the next ten days, and in from three to five seconds their features can be immortalized in superior style.  A better chance is not likely to occur very soon.

Mr. Merry is not recorded in other photographic directories.