Category Archives: Talbotype

George Harrison Hite

1850                247 Broadway, New York, New York.

George Harrison Hite was recorded in two announcements and seven advertisements.  The first announcement ran on June 18, 1850 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Samuel R. Fanshaw & George H. Hite[1], miniature and portrait painters, have associated with W. & F. Langenheim, the celebrated Daguerreotype and Talbotype artist of Philadelphia, and purchased the splendid National Miniature Gallery, established by Edwards, Anthony & Clark, 247 Broadway, corner Murray street, where they will superintend the sittings for Daguerreotypes.  Their Talbotype miniatures and portraits, which are taken upon ivory, ivory-paper, etc., may be seen in the above gallery.  There is but one prevailing opinion, that they possess all the truthfulness of a good Daguerreotype, with all the artistic merit that has characterized the former highly finished miniatures of those artists.  For further evidence; please call and see them.

The first advertisement ran on June 27 & 28, 1850 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes and Daguerreotypes.—The subscribers having purchased the National Miniature Gallery, 247 Broadway, (late E. White’s) are prepared to take Talbotype Portraits of all sizes, up to the size of life.  The fidelity of likeness, and the beautiful finish of these pictures, gain them greater popularity every day.  Daguerreotypes taken in the most approved style.  The public are respectfully invited to examine specimens at our establishment, 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The second advertisement ran from July 3 to 6, 1850 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes and Daguerreotypes.—The subscribers having purchased the National Miniature Gallery, 247 Broadway, (late E. White’s) are prepared to take Talbotype Portraits of all sizes, up to the size of life.  The fidelity of likeness, and the beautiful finish of these pictures, gain them greater popularity every day.  Daguerreotypes taken in the most approved style.  The public are respectfully invited to examine specimens at our establishment, 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The third advertisement appeared on July 10, 1850 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes, or Portraits on Ivory and ivory paper, are daily taken in a superior style, and in any size required up to the size of life, at the National Miniature Gallery.  Daguerreotypes taken in the most artistical style.  The public are invited to examine specimens at 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The fourth advertisement ran from July 14 to 17, 1850.  In The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes, or Portraits on Ivory and ivory paper, are daily taken in a superior style, and in any size required up to the size of life, at the National Miniature Gallery.  Daguerreotypes taken in the most artistical style.  The public are invited to examine specimens at 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The Fifth advertisement ran on July 18 & 19, 1850 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes, or Portraits on Ivory and ivory paper and glass, and daguerreotypes are daily taken by the subscribers, in a superior style, and in any size required up to the size of life. The public are respectfully invited to examine specimens at the National Miniature Gallery, 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The sixth advertisement ran on July 16 & 20, 1850 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Fine Arts—Talbotypes, or Portraits on Ivory, Ivory Paper and Glass, and Daguerreotypes, are daily taken by the subscribers in a superior style, and in any size required up to the size of life.  The public are respectfully invited to examine specimens at the National Miniature Gallery, 247 Broadway.  Hite, Langenheim &  Fanshaw.

The seventh advertisement appeared on August 29, 1850 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  To Artists.—An artists who understands Miniature Portrait Painting in oil and water colors, and who can give proof of his talents, can find employment at the National Miniature Gallery, No. 247 Broadway.  None but competent persons need apply.  Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw.

The second announcement appeared on October 9, 1851 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  The Daguerreotypes At The Fair….The likeness of Mr. Hite, the miniature painter, is exquisite…. (Root Daguerreotype).

[1] The New York Historical Society Dictionary Of Artist in America 1564-1860.  Records both George Harrison Hite and Samuel Raymond Fanshaw as portrait and miniature painter.

 

William H. Harrington

1850-1851       6 Camp Street, New Orleans, Louisiana.

William H. Harrington was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements in The Daily Crescent (New Orleans, Louisiana).  The first announcement ran on March 1, 1850. In speaking of the fine arts, we must not overlook the recent improvement in the Daguerreotype, by which impressions are made on paper instead of on a metallic plate.  At Maguire & Harrington’s, specimens may be seen executed by the new process.  The view of Canal street, during the inundation, presents one of the most beautiful landscapes we have ever seen, equaling in beauty the views of the—“Glorious city in the sea.”

The first advertisement ran from March 2, 1850 to January 21, 1851.  Daguerreotype, Talbotype Hyalotype Gallery.  Maguire & Harrington, having purchased from the assignees of W. F. Talbot, the patent right for the use of his Talbotype process, in the States of Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Texas, begs leave to call the attention of the public to their gallery of specimens in this new department of Photography.

The Talbotype is taken upon paper, ivory, glass, metal, and a variety of other substances, the first possessing the decided advantages of easy transmissibility by mail, can be enclosed in a letter, made to adorn the pages of a book, or preserved in a portfolio.

The Talbotype is eminently susceptible of coloring, so that the picture can be finished to any degree desired by the sitter; every variety of texture and color of the drapery and complexion, color of the eyes and hair, can be faithfully delineated.

The Talbotype represents the sitter without any reverse effect; a mole or scar upon the right check, appears upon the right cheek.  The Talbotype can be duplicated to any extent without the additional trouble of another sitting.  After the first Impression is taken, copies can be furnished at any future time upon simple application by letter or otherwise.

N. B.—M. & H. being furnished with every facility for the prosecution of this superior art, are ready to dispose of rights for the States specified, with thorough instructions. Daguerreotypes they profess to take quicker and better than any other establishment in the world. They guaranty a perfect likeness of a child of six months, in one second, or no charge. mh1.  No. 6 Camp Street.

The second announcement appeared on January 14, 1851.  The Daguerreotype Art.— We refer our readers to the advertisement of Col. T. J. Dobyns, one of the most distinguished daguerrean artist in America, who has taken the extensive establishment, No. 6 Camp street, lately occupied by McGuire & Harrington.  The former patrons of that establishment will find that it has lost nothing by the change; and that is saying a great deal.  We have known Col. Dobyns for many years, and we speak advisedly when we say he has the highest possible claims to the public confidence and patronage.  He is one of those rare men we occasionally meet with, and only occasionally, who, from their strong intellectual endowments, and force of character, will place themselves, in despite of all obstacles, at the head of whatever profession they engage in.  He has carried this art to its highest degree of perfection, and we wish him the success to which his high merits entitle him.

Advertisement ran from January 13 to 25, 1851.  Daguerreotyping—Maguire’s old stand, No. 6 Camp street.—The subscriber, having leased this well known and celebrated establishment, and secured the services of Dr. W. H. Harrington, partner of J. Maguire for the last four years, will continue the business at No. 6 Camp street; where he is prepared to furnish Likenesses, of all sizes, equal to any in the United States.  From long experience and strict attention, he trusts fully to sustain the reputation of this long established Gallery.

Gallery, No. 28 Camp street, will at all times be open for the reception of visitors and stock dealers.  T. J. Dobyns.

Dr. Harrington avails himself of this opportunity to return his thanks to his friends and the public for the liberal patronage heretofore received, and respectfully solicits a continuance of the same, at the above Gallery.

William H. Harrington is recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry identifies him as William C. Harrington.

A. Q. Brauns

1850                247 Broadway, New York, New York.

A. Q. Brauns was listed in one announcement and seven advertisements in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) between November 8 and December 17, 1850. In order to discuss Brauns we need to first look into the history of the Langenheim Brothers in New York between 1845 through 1850.

Langenheim & Beckers, 201 Broadway have been recorded in four different newspapers with a total of five advertisements from April 7, 1845 to April 27, 1847.  The next appearance of Langenheim in N.Y.C. is in the firm of Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw at 247 Broadway they appeared in two advertisements July 16 and August 29, 1850.  On September 27 through October 10, 1850 five advertisements appear in the New York Tribune signed Langenheim & Co., National Miniature Gallery.  On October 23, 1850 the advertisement is only recorded as National Miniature Gallery.  The majority of the seven advertisements and the announcement identify Brauns as A. Q.  accept for the first one which identifies him as A. J. Brauns.  In Craig’s Daguerreian Registry he identifies him as A. D. Brauns and being active in 1851 at 247 Broadway, John makes the note that this was Anthony’s address. In fact if you use the newspaper advertisements and notices/articles Anthony was at 247 Broadway from 1843 through 1847 and at 205 Broadway from 1848 to 1851. In 1852 through 1856 at 308 Broadway.

Note that the advertisements for Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw; Langenheim & Co., National Miniature Gallery; National Miniature Gallery; and A. Q. Brauns are very similar in content they all advertise Talbotypes, or Likenesses on Ivory-paper.  an example of the first advertisement which appeared on November 8, 1850 follows.  Fine Arts.—Talbotypes, or Likenesses on Ivory-paper.  The great advantage of these new pictures gain for them greater popularity every day.  These Likenesses are made of all sizes, up to the size of life.  Valuable Daguerreotypes of deceased persons copied in any size on Ivory paper and finished equal to the best paintings.  The public are invited to examine specimens at No. 247 Broadway.  A. J. Brauns, (late Langenheim & Co.)

The announce which appeared on November 19, 1850.  Fine Arts.—We call the attention of the art-loving public to the new Talbotype Portraits of the establishment of Mr. A. Q. Brauns, (late Langenheim & Co.) 247 Broadway, which seems to combine the exact likeness of the photograph with all the expressive effect of the oil or miniature painting.  The process by which the Talbotypes (as these pictures are named after their inventor,) are taken accuracy of outline, proper gradation of light and shadow, with a graceful and easy position; while the talented workmanship of eminent artists gives to these pictures the characteristic expression so much admired in the productions of the best masters in portraiture.  No small advantage is, that this process obviates the necessity of those tedious sittings required by artists that draw by the eye; one or two sittings, of a few minutes’ duration each being all that is required.  We would advise the public to examine the fine collection of specimens that Mr. Brauns has at his rooms, which will repay the trouble of visiting them.  We also call attention to the advertisement in another column of our paper.

A. Q. Brauns does not appear in the Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900.  It is unknown if Brauns connection with Langenheim extends to the partnership of Hite, Langenheim & Fanshaw or to the Langenheim Brothers studio in Philadelphia.

Professor James Van Zandt Blaney

Professor James Van Zandt Blaney was recorded in the May 18, 1849 Keowee Courier (Pickens Court House, South Carolina.)    Talbotype Drawing.—A friend of ours has sent us a specimen of Talbotype drawing, an improvement on daguerreotyping, which consists in fixing the object on paper instead of on a metal plate.  It is a new invention, and the picture before us-a cottage, the residence of Dr. Blaney, in Chicago—is remarkably clear and distinct.  We are not aware that any pictures after the Talbotype method have yet been taken in New Orleans.  The one under notice was executed by Dr. Blaney, Professor of Chemistry in the Medical College of Chicago, who, we are informed, has made still further improvements in this beautiful art.—N. O. Pic.