Tag Archives: Richmond Virginia

C. A. Johnston

1856                [8th Street and Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D. C.]

C. A. Johnston was recorded in two announcements. The first appeared on July 30, 1856 in the Daily American Organ (Washington, District of Columbia). Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of 8th street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred to the Committee on Police.

The second announcement appeared on July 31, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Mr. Walker presented the petition of C. A. Johnston, asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon at the corner of eighth street and Louisiana avenue; which was referred.

C. A. Johnston does not appear in other photographic directories. There is a possibility that C. A. Johnston is Mr. Johnson a daguerrean in Richmond, Virginia with traveling daguerreotype wagons (entry posted on 9-4-19.) There is no indication that the petition was approved.

Mr. Johnson

1856-1857       Wagons on the Corner of 7th & Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia.

Mr. Johnson was recorded in seven announcements and six advertisements in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virgini).  The first announcement appeared on March 28, 1856.  Daguerreotype Wagons.—Two of Johnson’s Wagons, No. 7 and 10, are now in Richmond, corner of 7th and Broad streets, built with best lights.  Johnson himself, with twelve years’ experience, is operating in them.  Brilliant and highly finished likenesses for Fifty Cents and One Dollar—half the usual prices.  Go early to avoid the crowd.

The second announcement appeared on March 31, 1856.  Fathers!  Mothers!  Brothers!  Sisters!  Friends!—Go to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one of his fifty cents or dollar likenesses.

The third announcement appeared on April 1, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad sts., and get one or two to give to your friends.

The fourth announcement appeared on April 2, 1856.  A Word to the Wise, &c.—Two of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons are now corner of 7th and Broad streets.  The superior lights enable him to take good pictures in any kind of weather.  His work is of the best style; he has been many years at it.  Reduced prices, fifty cents and one dollar.

The fifth announcement appeared on April 3, 1856.  Why do you Dress so nicely to get Your Likeness?—Go just as you are to Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get on of his Fifty Cent or Dollar pictures.  He will make your cloths look equal to the best.

The sixth announcement appeared on April 4, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The first announcement ran from April 5 to May 29, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The seventh announcement appeared on April 8, 1856.  Wanted.—Two Horses and a Driver for a little more than one hour a day, for which one dollar each day will be paid.  Apply to Mr. Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets.

The second advertisement ran from May 1 to June 4, 1856.  A Book For Nothing!  Instructions Gratis!—Go to the Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two of Johnson’s 50 cent or dollar pictures for your friends; and he will give you his Treatise on daguerreotyping and Photography, by which you may learn the various processes used in the art.  Remember his prices are low.  He does a large business can sell cheap.  Johnson with his assistants take a very large number of Daguerreotypes daily.  He can, therefore, sell you larger pictures for 50 Cents and One Dollar, than you can get elsewhere; they are in the best style.  He has been many years in the business.  Good pictures taken in any kind of weather, as the lights in the wagons are built for the purpose.  Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad streets.

The third advertisement ran from May 12 to 14, 1856.  Five Operators, with extra Apparatus, and another of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons, corner of 7th and Broad streets, will be engaged during the holidays, so that visitors will not be delayed.  Those desiring good and cheap pictures will do well to embrace this opportunity, as Johnson’s stay in this city is now very limited.  For the quality of the pictures, he refers to the twelve hundred ladies and gentlemen who have patronized him in Richmond.  Price Fifty Cents, One Dollar and upwards.   Daguerreotype Wagons, Corner 7th and Broad Streets.

The fourth advertisement ran from June 17 to 19, 1856.   A Good Business Chance.—One of Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagons with apparatus complete, for-sale cheap.  It is now doing a good business.  And one of Johnson’s operators would remain with the purchaser for a time, if required, and could thoroughly instruct him in the art.  For terms, &c. enquire at the Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad Streets.

The fifth advertisement ran from June 11 to November 6, 1856.  If you have seen any of Johnson’s Fifty Cent or Dollar Pictures, you will go to his Daguerreotype Wagons, corner 7th and Broad streets, and get one or two likenesses to give to your friends.  They are in the best style, and larger than you can get elsewhere.  Johnson himself is operating in these wagons.  No. 7 and 10; he has been about 12 years in the business.

The sixth Advertisement ran from December 13, 1856 to January 28, 1857.  Many Thousand Likenesses have been taken this year in Johnson’s Daguerreotype Wagon, corner of 7th and Broad streets.  Go and get one of his 50 cents or dollar pictures, and you will be pleased with it.

Mr. Johnson does not appear in other photographic directories as being active in Richmond, Virginia.  Further research is needed on this daguerreotypist, he claims to have twelve years’ experience (ca. 1844) and has a number of traveling daguerreotype wagons.  So far these are the only announcements/advertisements found, or anyone by name Johnson with a daguerreian wagon(s). There are several Johnson’s who were active in the early 1840’s but to suggest them would be pure speculation.  A listing for C. A. Johnston (will be posted on 9-10-19) appears on July 30 & 31, 1856 were he is asking permission to locate a travelling daguerreotype wagon in Washington, D. C. Its possible they are the same person based on the proximity to Richmond the dates of the announcements and spelling variant of his last name.

Charles W. Grey

1557-1858       167 Main, Opposite the Exchange Bank, Richmond Virginia.                                  1858                   371 Broadway, New York, New York.

Charles W. Grey was recorded in two advertisements in The Daily Dispatch.  (Richmond, Virginia).  The first advertisement ran from December 3 to 10, 1857.  Large Ambrotypes. For Only Twenty-Five Cents, At Grey’s, Opposite the Exchange Bank, Richmond, Va.

The second advertisement ran from January 6 to 12, 1858.  Children!  Children!!  Children!!!  Wonderful Improvement In The Arts.  Magnificent Ambrotypes taken of Children of all ages in two seconds, at Grey’s Gallery, 167 Main street, opposite the Exchange Bank, Richmond, Va., 371 Broadway, two doors above Taylors Saloon, New York.

Charles W. Grey is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Richmond, Virginia.

C. J. Fox

1858                 Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

C. J. Fox appeared in an advertisement on March 18, 1858 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Rooms Wanted, For A Photographic Gallery On the second or third floor.  The south side of Main street, between 7th and 12, preferred.  Apply personally or by letter, to C. J. Fox, American Hotel.

A Charles J. Fox is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New York City in 1859.  It is unknown if they are the same person.

Thomas A. Duke

1856                Rooms at 139 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

Thomas A. Duke was recorded in three advertisements.  The first advertisement ran from April 11 to May 10, 1856 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  A Card.—Thomas A. Duke.—Having purchased Mr. Power’s Daguerrian Gallery. No. 139 Main street, I shall continue the business in the same style it has been heretofore conducted, having an operator who has had long experience in some of the first Galleries in the Union, and we feel confident that we can please the most fastidious with pictures gotten up in first-rate order, and on the most reasonable terms.  I shall endeavor to make my Saloon both attractive and pleasant, and hope the public will give us a call, and patronize us according to our merit.  Thos. Duke.

The second advertisement ran from May 17 to 23, 1856 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Persons wanting any style of “Daguerreotype” pictures have only to call on “Duke,” No. 139 Main street, and they will certainly get one to please them, on more reasonable terms than elsewhere to be had, put up in plain or fancy cases, or in pins, rings, lockets, &c., &c., as may suit the taste.

The third advertisement ran from September 25 to October 1, 1856 in The Daily Dispatch.  (Richmond, Virginia).  By E. B. Cook, & Co., Aucts., Trustee’s Sale Of Furniture, Pictures, Daguerrean Apparatus, &c. &c., At Auction.—By virtue of a deed of Trust, made by Thomas A. Duck, to the undersigned, and duly recorded in the Richmond Hustings Court, I shall proceed to sell at the Daguerrean Rooms of said Thomas A Duck, main street, over the store of James Woodhouse & Co., on Thursday, Oct. 2d, at 10 o’clock, all the Daguerrean Apparatus, Carpets, Oil Cloth, Sofas, Chairs, Stoves, Centre Table, Bureau, Frames, Pictures, &c., &c., mentioned in said deed of trust.  Also at the same time and place will be sold the unexpired lease of said Daguerrean Rooms.  B. W. Starke, Trustee.  Sale conducted by E. B. Cook & Co., Aucts.

Thomas A. Duke is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge

1856                Rooms over Hicks’ China Hall, Nashville, Tennessee

J. W. & E. S. Wood were recorded in an announcement on October 26, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). Mechanics’ Institute.  Second Annual Exhibition.  Premiums Awarded…   Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory……………………. 5.                                            J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…….…5.                                          A. Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes……………………………….……. 5.                            Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes……………………………5.

The identity of the J. W. is probably John Wood Dodge who was active in St. Louis, Missouri in 1855 and in Nashville, Tennessee from 1855-1858(+).  E. S. is probably Edward Samuel Dodge.  In looking through genealogical records I discovered that they were in fact brothers.  Both were painters and are recorded in the New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in American 1564-1860.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list Edward Samuel in Richmond, Virginia in 1844 and Augusta, Georgia in 1850-1853.  Early Georgia Photographers 1841-1861 a Biographical Checklist Compiled by E. Lee Eltzroth list him in in Augusta, Georgia from 1848-1853.

W. Calhoun Cralle

1854                Rooms at Mansion House, 37 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.                        1855                37 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.[1]

W. Calhoun Cralle was recorded in an advertisement that ran from May 4 to June 7, 1854 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  New Skylight Daguerrean Gallery—W. Calhoun Cralle, Daguerreotypist, having opened Daguerrean Rooms in this city, offers his professional services to the citizens and public generally.  He will give his constant personal attention to his rooms, and hopes by strict application to business to be able to execute Pictures in a style worthy of the art and its professors; yet he will make no promises to excel, but submits his claims to patronage to a discriminating public on his merits.  He can be found at his Rooms, No. 37 (Mansion House) Main street, from sunrise to sunset.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather.  Prices uniform.

W. Calhoun Cralle has been reported in other photographic directories. Craig Daguerreian Registry list him only in 1855. While Photographers in Virginia, 1839-1900 list him in 1854 & 1855.  In both directories he is listed as W. C. Cralle.

[1] Photographers in Virginia, 1839-1900: a checklist.  By Louis Ginsburg

Dr. A. Caspari

1843-1844       Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

Dr. A. Caspari was recorded twice in advertisements that appeared the in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on June 1, and ran until September 5, 1843 and on October 17, 1843 to January 26, 1844.  It is unknown if Dr. Caspari is a daguerreotypist, a supplier or just an agent for the Langenheim Brothers.  Philip Haas, Edward White, and Peter Laurens[1] are daguerreotypist, Dr. Caspari and William West are not recorded in other photographic directories that I have access to.

Philadelphia Daguerreotype Establishment.  Exchange Building, Rooms 26 & 27.  The Subscribers, having procured the agency for the sale of Voigtander’s Daguerreotype Apparatus, constructed according to Professor Petzval’s calculation, have on hand a large assortment of these Apparatus, and artists as well as amateurs of their art, wishing to procure a good apparatus, will find it to their advantage to procure instruments of this construction.  They also have lately imported a large quantity of German and French plates, and all the chemicals used in their art, which they warrant in every respect, as they are made to their order.  Polishing substances, and morocco cases, and all necessary materials, are sold on the most reasonable terms.  The following gentlemen have agreed to act as their agents, viz:—                                                                                                                                      E. White, 175 Broadway, N. Y.                                                                                                                              P. Haas, Esq., Washington, D. C.                                                                                                                      Dr. A. Caspari, Richmond, Va.                                                                                                                              P. Laurens, Esq., Savannah, Ga.                                                                                                                  William West, Esq., Cincinnati, Ohio. Added to advertisement on June 22, 1843.

All communications (post paid) and orders, accompanied with remittance, will be promptly attended to, and should be directed to W. & F. Langenheim, Exchange Building, Phila.

The second advertisement ran on  October 17, 1843.  Peter Laurens has been replaced by Samuel Broadbent for the Southern States.  Philadelphia Daguerreotype Establishment.  Exchange Building, Rooms 26 & 27.  The Subscribers, has received a large supply of Voigtander’s celebrated Daguerreotype Apparatus, large and small sizes, with achromatic lenses made according to Professor Petzval’s calculation.

Also a new supply of the best plates and chemicals, which he warrants good and sells at reduced prices.  The following gentlemen have agreed to act as their agents, viz:—                E. White, 175 Broadway, N. Y. P. Haas, Esq., Washington, D. C. Dr. A. Caspari, Richmond, Va.  S. Broadbent, Esq., for the Southern States.  William West, Esq., Cincinnati, Ohio.

All communications (post paid) and orders, accompanied with remittance, will be promptly attended to, and should be directed to William Langenheim, Exchange Building, Phila.

[1] Active in Savannah, Georgia from 1843 until at least 1863.  Early Georgia Photographers, 1841 – 1861: a Biographical Checklist, Compiled by E. Lee Eltzroth.

 

Bossue

Bossue was recorded in an advertisement for Tyler and Co. on April 14, 1857 on The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia.)  The Twenty Artist that Tyler & Co. employ are not mere pretenders in their business, but are regular educated gentlemen, calculated to excel in the fine arts and scientific results.  The ease and poetry of position, the life-like expressions of the features and eyes of the portraits, taken at 139 Main street, is not the effect of bungling mechanical doings, but of true artistic skill, seldom met with.  Bossue, the principal Artist of this famous establishment, has been the pioneer in Photography in Europe the last ten years.

Bossue is not recorded in other American photographic directories.  Of the hundreds of advertisements for Tyler & Co., this is the only one that mentions Bossue by name.

Louis J. Bossieux

Louis J. Bossieux was recorded on September 9, 1854 in an advertisement in The Daily Dispatch  (Richmond, Virginia.)  Wanted—To sell a Daguerrean Apparatus complete, with chemicals and stock.  It will be sold low and on a credit of six months.  Should a person purchase it ignorant of the art, they will be instructed.  Apply to Louis J. Bossieux.

Many question surround this entry for Bossieux.  Was he a dealer in Daguerrean equipment?  Did he somehow acquire the camera?  Or the probable scenario was that he a daguerreotypist selling his equipment and getting out of the business?  At this point this is pure speculation on my part.  There are no listing for Bossieux other photographic directories that I have checked, nor is he listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.