Tag Archives: Richmond Virginia

P. Henry Duke

1855-1856       139 Main Street, Over Woodhouse’s Bookstore, Richmond, Virginia.

1859                188 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia,

P. Henry Duke (in the partnership of Powers & Duke 1855-1856) was recorded in twenty six advertisements, and one announcement in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia)  and one article in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal.  The first advertisement ran from January 8 to 11, 1855.  Co-Partnership.—The undersigned have this day formed a Co partnership under the firm of Powers & Duke, for the purpose of carrying on the Daguerrean Business, and solicits a continuance of the patronage hitherto extended to their Senior Partner.

E. M. Powers, P. Henry Duke, 139 Main Street, over Woodhouse’s Bookstore.  ja. 8.

2d advertisement ran from January 19 to February 1, 1855.  How Life-Like, Beautiful And Cheap!—Such is almost the universal cry of those who have visited our Gallery and obtained for themselves a beautiful flesh-tint Daguerreotype, taken only by Powers & Duke, 139 Main st.  We particularly invite our friends, both city and country, to give us a call, as we are prepared to give all in want a beautiful flesh-tint Daguerreotype for only 50 Cents.

Come, friends and the public, one and all—

If a picture you wish which is nice—

Over Woodhouse’s store just give us a call;

You cannot object to the price.

Powers & Duke, Sign of the Red Flag. 

3d advertisement ran from February 2 to 8, 1855.  The Only gallery where you can get a Daguerreotype for 50 cents; and of the many hundreds sent out within the last two months, not a single one but what have given ample satisfaction in every respect.

We return our thanks to our friends and the public, and respectfully invite one and all to call and examine specimens, whether they set for a Picture or not.

Remember this is the only place to get a Daguerreotype for fifty cents.  Powers & Duke, 139 Main st., Sign of the Red Flag. 

4th advertisement ran from February 9 to March 6, 1855.  Fifty Cent Daguerreotypes are all the rage in our city, and Powers & Duke are the only men that can give you a superb likeness for Fifty Cents.  This is no humbug.  Their flesh tint Daguerreotypes are the best we have ever seen, and their pictures are warranted to please or no sale.  We have seen hundreds of their 50 cent Likenesses, and we pronounce them inferior to none, and far superior to many taken at other Galleries at a cost of Two Dollars.  For a good and cheap Picture call at Powers & Duke, 139 Main st., Over Woodhouse’s Bookstore, Eagle Square.

5th advertisement ran from March 6 to 19, 1855.  A Perfect Rush For Powers & Duke’s 50 cent Daguerreotypes, which, like the Penny Post and Dispatch, are too well known to need puffing.  We think it only necessary to remind the public of being still at the old stand, 139 Main street, where we are daily taking a great many of those beautiful 50 cent Daguerreotypes, which have been so much admired by every one who has seen them, and have been pronounced by judges to be superior to any taken at other galleries in this city for two dollars each.  While the weather is favorable to the art, we would respectfully invite one and all to give us a call before visiting elsewhere—Don’t forget the name and number.

Powers & Duke, 139 Main street, sign of the red flag, Over Woodhouse’s Bookstore.  mh. 6.

6th advertisement ran from March 23 to 27, 1855.  Powers & Duke Take Daguerreotypes For 50 Cents Each.—Call today and get one.  Stereoscope Pictures taken at $4, and warranted satisfactory.

Powers & Duke, 139 Main street, sign of the red flag, Over Woodhouse’s Bookstore.  mh. 23.

7th advertisement ran from March 28 to April 17, 1855.  50 Cent Daguerreotypes Are All The Go, to be had only at Powers & Duke’s large Sky Light Gallery, 139 Main street.

Our Daguerreotypes are warranted not to fade or change color, and those who wish something really good will do well to give us a call, over Woodhouse’s Bookstore—sign of the Red Flag. Powers & Duke. 

8th advertisement ran from April 19 to May 1, 1855.  Powers & Duke are still supplying their numerous friends and thousands of customers with beautiful and life-like Daguerreotypes, for 50 cents each.  They do not wish to humbug the public by saying that high priced pictures are the best; but this they do say, that their 50 cent likenesses are superior to many taken in this city at two dollars each.  All who want a picture worth carrying home, are respectfully invited to call at No. 139 Main street, over Woodhouse’s Bookstore, Eagle Square. 

9th advertisement ran from May 1 to 5, 1855.  5000 Daguerreotypes, taken by Powers & Duke, Since the first of January last.  This is enough to satisfy the curious that they are the men to call on for your Daguerreotypes.

Call to-day and get one of their never fading 50 Cent Daguerreotypes.  139 Main street, over Woodhouse’s Bookstore, Sign of the Red Flag. 

10th advertisement ran from May 8 to June 21, 1855.  From 50 Cents to $25—Lovers of Good Pictures are respectfully informed that Powers & Duke are the only artists in this city that offer good Daguerreotypes, from 50 cts. to $25, which is an inducement to every one in want of a good and beautiful Daguerreotype.  To be had only of Powers & Duke, 139 Main st., Over Woodhouse’s Bookstore, Eagle Square.  my. 8.

11th advertisement ran from June 23 to July 14.  Our Thanks are due to the people of Richmond, and especially to the “Young Guard,” for the liberal patronage bestowed upon us for the past year, for which we are very thankful, and hope to merit a continuance of the same, promising to use every means, without regard to expense, necessary to produce the finest Daguerreotypes ever offered to the public.

Our prices range from 50 cents to $30.  Stereoscopes taken for $5.              All Pictures warranted. Powers & Duke, 139, Main street, over Northern Telegraph Office.                           

12th advertisement ran from July 16 to August 15, 1855.  What The Virginia Gazette Says—If you want an exact image of your face and features, which you can hand down to your latest posterity, drop in to see Messrs. Powers & Duke.  Their Daguerreotypes never fade, and beside are as true as nature itself.  You can see the very fine sparkling in the eye.  We have tried the artistic skill of these gentlemen, and therefore speak from experience.

Those who have beauty, should to this firm take it; Those who have none should go to them to make it.  [Virginia Gazette. 

13th advertisement ran from August 14 to 18, 1855.  Daguerreotypes.—Call at Powers & Duke’s splendid Daguerrean Gallery and secure for yourself a beautiful Picture.

Here art triumphant our attention claims;

Here life seems speaking from a hundred frames;

Belles, merchants, statesmen throng the pictured walls—

Each face, each form its living type recall.—

Features, complexion, attitude, attire;

Beauty’s soft smile and manhood’s glance of fire,

Truly reflected from the burnished plate,

Astonish life with its own duplicate.

Think not these portraits by the sunlight made.

Shades though they are, will like a shadow fade—

No!  When the life of flesh in dust shall lie—

When Death’s grey film o’erspread the beaming eye—

These life-like pictures, mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day!

Gallery 139 Main street, Eagle Square, over Woodhouse’s Bookstore. 

1st announcement appeared on August 15, 1855.  Let the world say what it will, Watson’s Richmond’s Laureate still.

Poetry by the Protype Bard and Port Laureate of the city of Richmond.  Spoken extemporaneously in the presence of witnesses, after having his Likeness taken by Powers & Duke, whose Likeness has been seen (in his gold medal) by the President of the United States and the Mayor of Baltimore; also by Commodores Perry and Aulick, U. S. N., and supposed to be true and correct likeness of that great and immortal genius:

All that want their likeness took,

Step in with faith to Powers & Duke;

‘Tis true, the Artist and the Tailor

May embellish Nature’s failure;—

None can equal these two men,

That’s took me once and once again;

I am took fair in every feature,

As I was formed by mother Nature.

Lord knows I never was a beauty,

But if, my friends, this likeness suit ye,

I faithful told each Daguerrean

To let the Phototype be seen;

Though I am Richmond’s Poet laureate,

Not one cent they charged me for it.

As I must speak my mind sincere,

All who want their likeness here—

All who Tom Watson’s face do know,

Powers & Duke the same will show,—

Honest, fair, by Nature took.

Just step in to Powers & Duke.

Thomas Watson.

Prototype Bard of Virginia and Poet laureate of the city of Richmond, the only living successor of Byron, Burns, Milton, Moore and the immortal Wm. Shakspeare.   

14th advertisement ran from August 22 to September 12, 1855.  Powers & Duke’s Daguerreotypes, which has created such a sensation with the public, are still to be had at 139, Main street.

We have several late improvements in the art, to which we invite particular attention.  Boston Quick for sale by Powers & Duke. 

2nd announcement appeared on September 11, 1855.  Aid For The Sufferers.—We have to acknowledge from Messrs. Powers & Duke $22 for the benefit of the afflicted of Norfolk and Portsmouth.  This sum was received at their Daguerrean Gallery, yesterday.  With a commendable benevolence, they sat apart their receipts for the day to this humane object.  Their generous contribution shall have the proper destination.

15th advertisement ran from September15 to October 11, 1855.  Daguerreotypes.—We have seen some of Powers & Duck’s new style of Daguerreotypes, and pronounce them superior to any we ever saw, and is a decided improvement on the old style of Daguerreotype.  Call and see them. 

16th advertisement ran from October 1 to 5, 1855.  Daguerreotypes.—Powers & Duke, Eagle Square.

Daguerreotypes must be perfection,

Since pictured by the sun’s direction,

Heaven’s own bright rays shed from above,

To enshrine the forms of those we love.  oc. 1.

17th advertisement ran from October 16 to 20, 1855.  Daguerreotypes.—Powers & Duke are offering great inducements to persons in want of good and desirable Daguerreotypes.  All of our Pictures are warranted to please or no sale.  

18th advertisement ran from October 26 to November 2, 1856.  Daguerreotypes.—It is well known that we seldom or never award praise to those to whom it is not due; therefore those who may chance to read this will know that we speak true when we say that Powers & Duke’s Flesh-Tint Daguerreotypes are unsurpassed by any one, and we advise our friends, if they want the worth of their money, and a likeness that will not fade, to call on them, over Woodhouse & Co.’s Bookstore, Main st.

19th advertisement ran from November 20 to December 3, 1855.  50 Cent Daguerreotypes.—By the solicitation of many of our friends, we commence this day to take good and durable Daguerreotypes for 50 cents.   Respectfully, Powers & Duke. 

20th advertisement ran from November 24 to December 1, 1855.  Ain’t we glad that Powers & Duke have returned again to taking Daguerreotypes for 50 cents.  Oh! They are such dear little things.  no. 24.

21st advertisement ran from December 12, 1855 to January 16, 1856.  50 Cent Daguerreotypes.—Powers & Duke are still furnishing their customers with their never-failing Daguerreotypes for 50 cts. each.  They do not pretend to humbug the people with Ambrotypes or Glass Pictures, hermotically sealed between two glasses; but they are still taking their world-renowned Flesh Tint Daguerreotypes, which are to well known to the people of Virginia, and which have received the highest praise, both for their cheapness and durability. 

The article appeared in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on June 1, 1856, P. 217.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Three, Richmond. The author visited 7 Galleries in Richmond.

Duke. — The specimens of this establishment, are complete caricatures on the art. Big heads on small plates, young ladies with bouquets in their hands, old ladies with either an orange or a red book clutched firmly between their fingers. Then imagine here and there a dab of red or yellow paint, marking out a watch or chain or some other jewelry, and you will have a good idea of these pictures, furnished all complete, gotten up and colored after the manner I have described, for the very low and degrading price of 50 cents. This establishment has not yet meddled with glass pictures; and for the sake of the art, for which I have always had a reverence, I hope it never will.

22d advertisement ran from January 10 to 16, 1856.  A Card.—The Firm of Powers & Duck is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  Those indebted to the firm will come forward and settle with E. M. Powers.  The creditors of the said firm will present their claims to said E. M. Powers for settlement.  E. M. Powers.  P. Henry Duke.  Richmond, January 3, 1856.

I have this day purchased of Mr. P. Henry Duke his entire interest in the Daguerrean Gallery known under the above firm and shall continue to carry on the business, hoping to merit a continuance of the patronage so liberally extended to the firm. E. M. Powers.  Richmond, January 8, 1856.

23d advertisement ran on July 20 & 21, 1859.  If you want a beautiful Likeness, go to Duke’s Gallery, corner above the Post-Office, at Osborne’s old stand.  Having lately engaged the services of one of the most talented artist in the United States, I am making nothing but the very best pictures, at prices from 25 cents to $25.

P. Henry Duke, Artist.             

24th advertisement ran on August 16 & 17, 1859.  Duke’s Gallery—Duke’s Gallery—Corner above Post-Office.  Corner above Post-Office.   Only Twenty-Five Cents, Fifty Cents, One Dollar and Up, For the best Pictures in the world.  Call and be convinced of the fact. 

25th advertisement appeared on August 30, 1859.  At Duke’s Gallery, Cor. Above the P. O.  Gallery, Cor. Above the P. O.  Gallery, Cor. Above the P. O.  Gallery, Cor. Above the P. O.  Gallery, Cor. Above the P. O.

$2 Ambrotypes $2 Ambrotypes $2 Ambrotypes $2 Ambrotypes $2 Ambrotypes.  Taken for 50 cents.  Taken for 50 cents.  Taken for 50 cents.  Taken for 50 cents.  Taken for 50 cents.  In a large size case, In a large size case, In a large size case, In a large size case, In a large size case,

And warranted in every respect.  And warranted in every respect.  And warranted in every respect.  And warranted in every respect.  And warranted in every respect.  Equal to those at other Galleries for $2.  Equal to those at other Galleries for $2.  

26th advertisement ran on December 29 & 30, 1859.  Duke’s Southern Photographic Temple Of Art, 188 Main st., cor. Above the Post-Office.

Plain Photographs executed for $1 only; Duplicates $9 per doz.  Ivorytypes $10 and up.  Photographs in Indian Ink, pastel, Water Colors, and Oil, from miniatures to life size, on the most reasonable terms.

Mr. Wm. S. Shaw, late of London, who had the honor of being selected by the Protestant Episcopal Missionary Board to photograph the Bishops, Clerical and Lay Delegates of the Episcopal Church of America that met here in convention in October, Is now engaged at the Southern Photographic Temple of Art, and the public may rest assured they will be supplied with first class work in all branches of the art, equal to that of any other establishment in the Union—as Mr. Shaw is well known , and acknowledged one of the first photographers of this country.

P. Henry Duke is not recorded in other photographic directories, nor is the partnership of Powers & Duke. William S. Shaw is not recorded as being active in 1859 in Richmond, Virginia. 

James F. Chalmers

1856-1857       145 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

James F. Chalmers worked for William A. Pratt and was in partnership of Sanxay (Richard S.) & Chalmers was recorded in twelve advertisements and two announcements in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  The first advertisement ran from May 17 to June17, 1856.  A Card.—For the last ten years I have received a large and increasing patronage from the citizens of Virginia, which I have endeavored to merit by introducing every improvement into my business, in which I have been greatly aided, for some years, by the valuable assistance (more particularly in Ambrotyping) of Mr. R. S. Sanxay and in addition, I shall hereafter have the services of Mr. James F. Chalmers—which, together with my own general superintendence, will enable me to accomplish, I flatter myself, superior work to any I have previously turned out.  I respectfully request the public to call and examine my specimens at Pratt’s Gallery, No. 145 Main st., Richmond, Va.

The second advertisement ran from September 25 to October 9, 1856.  Something New!—An Improvement on Ambrotypes, by which process the picture is made to stand out like the stereoscope, without the use of the lens.

This is an entirely new invention, and is infinitely superior in every respect to the Balsom Pictures, being much more durable and not at all liable to spot, (the great objection to the Balsom Picture.)

This style of Picture is taken at Pratt’s Virginia Gallery, 145 Main street.  The public are respectfully invited to call and examine the specimens.  All pictures warranted to please. R. S. Sanxay, Jas. F. Chalmers, Operators.                                                             

The third advertisement ran from October 10 to 25, 1856.  Returned from Europe.—We beg leave to inform the public thatour Mr. Pratt has returned from England and France, bringing with him all the late improvements in our beautiful art. 

The Ambrotype finished in oil, in the style of the old masters, far exceeds in perfection any thing ever before attempted, and throws the Balsom pictures completely into the shade.

Mr. Pratt will again render us the assistance of his valuable services.  All pictures warranted to please.  R. S. Sanxay, Jas. F. Chalmers, Operators.      

p. s.  The Altoscopic Ambrotype may also be had at Pratt’s Gallery.                       

The fourth advertisement ran from October 28 to November 3, 1856.  Pratt’s Virginia Daguerrian Gallery, No. 145 Main street, sign of the Gothic Window, where in the last 12 years, upwards of 30,000 portraits have been taken in all the varied styles of Ambrotype and Daguerreotypes.

The latest improvements have been obtained by Mr. Pratt in his late trip to Europe, and are now successfully practiced in this establishment, where we guarantee finer pictures than have been turned out in Richmond.

R. S. Sanxay, Jas. F. Chalmers, Operators.  Former pupils of the University, visiting Richmond will please call on Mr. Pratt, as above, and obtain their free tickets.                                                  

The fifth advertisement ran from November 10 to December 3, 1856.  Something New and Beautiful.—Acknowledged by all to be superior to anything yet discovered in the Photographic art as a proof of which all of the most celebrated artists north are taking Ambrotypes by no other process.  These pictures are to be had at Pratt’s Gallery, 145 Main street, where the public are respectfully invited to call and examine for themselves.  Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes copied in any way to suit customers, and all pictures warranted to please.  Sanxay & Chalmers, Operators.

The sixth advertisement ran from November 28 to December 29, 1856.  Co-partnership Notice.—We the undersigned, having on the 5th if May, 1856, purchased the business Stock and Fixtures of Wm. A. Pratt, in the Daguerrian and Ambrotype Gallery, No. 145 Main street, hereby enter into a co-partnership, to carry on said business on the cash system, we respectfully solicit a share of the patronage of the public, and only ask for an examination of our work.  R. S. Sanxay, Jas. F. Chalmers.

N. B.  I have great pleasure in recommending the above gentlemen, my successors, as the satisfaction which my pictures have given, is mainly ascribable to their efforts-having personally done but little in the business for some years past.  Respectfully, Wm. A. Pratt.            

The seventh advertisement ran from December 23, 1856 to January 22, 1857.  Christmas And New Year Presents.—There is nothing more acceptable than a correct life-like picture of a friend.  And we ask the public to give us a call and try us.  All our pictures are warranted to please.  Call at the Big Gothic Window, 145 Main street, and call early.  Sanxay & Chalmers.                                                                                                 

The eighth advertisement ran from April 9 to 14, 1857.  Ambrotypes!  This great improvement in the Photographic art, far surpasses anything ever yet brought out, for durability and life-like appearance—never fading, but always retaining their original brilliancy.  They can be seen in any light and for softness of tone and durability, they far surpass the old worn  Daguerreotype, which, in many instances, fade in a few months, and in a year or two become entirely extinct.  All in want of a good Ambrotype, will do well to call on Sanxay & Co., At the Gallery 145 Main street, Formerly occupied by W. A. Pratt.

Pictures put up in the best style, at very moderate prices.  A few very fine Engravings of the Rev. T. V. Moore.  Price $1 each.     S & Co.                                                                                               

The first announcement appeared on July 3, 1857.  A Sign Worth Looking At.—Several handsome ambrotypes of Phoenix Engine, No. 3, were taken yesterday by R. S. Sanxay.  The picture thus obtained, is to be copied by Mr. Montague upon a sign which he is executing for the Virginia Fire and marine Insurance Company, the Design of which is highly appropriate.  One side represents a shipwreck, and the reverse a block of buildings on fire.  “Phoenix” will occupy a prominent position, playing away upon the flames.

The ninth advertisement ran from July 7 to 13, 1857.  Photographs!  Photographs!  Photographs!—We take great pleasure in informing  our friends and the public, that we are now prepared to make the above most beautiful style of Portraits.  They have entirely superseded all other known styles wherever introduced.  They are better, cheaper and more artistic.  Five hundred copies may be struck off from a single sitting, surpassing the finest steel engraving.  Sanxay, & Chalmers, 125 Main st., Sign of Gothic Window.                

The tenth advertisement ran from September 7 to 11, 1857.  Photographing.—This art is fast taking the place of Lithographing.  An Extensive glass factory in this city has just ordered 500 copies of a diploma, to be taken by photography, the copying being done as well as if by a lithograph.—Dispatch of Thursday.

We respectfully inform the public that we are prepared to execute any style of copying from Daguerreotypes, Paintings, Engravings, or Drawings in the best manner, at the most reasonable rates.  Views of residences, churches, and places of business taken in the most artistic manner.

Sanxay & Chalmers, Photographists, 145 Main street.                                 

The eleventh advertisement ran from September 18 to 25, 1857. 

“A thing worth doing at all,

Is worth doing well!”

So if you wish a good Picture of yourself, go where an artist will make a miniature representation of yourself—not as a caricature, as is so often the case.  Sanxay & Chalmers’ Photographers, at 145 Main street, seem to excel in the life-like expression of their portraits, while they have a graceful ease that is perfectly bewitching.                                                         

The twelfth advertisement ran from September 28 to October 3, 1857.  Choice Styles Of Pictures.—At Sanxay & Chalmers, 145 Main street, may be obtained Photographs of the greatest accuracy and beauty, Ambrotypes, Stereographs, Mezzographs and Likenesses on patent leather, which may be sent by mail to friends, &c.  Every picture taken at this popular establishment must be of the best quality and please the sitter, otherwise they will not be sent out of the Gallery.

Copies of the Portraits of the Convention of ’49 and ’50 will be ready in a few days.  All orders by mail promptly attended to.                                                                                          

The second announcement appeared on November 7, 1857.  List of Premiums Awarded At The Fair Of The Va. Mechanics’ Institute, November 5th, 1857…Class 26.—Photographs, Daguerreotypes, and Ambrotypes.

Albert Litch, for color photographs, a silver medal.

Tyler & Co., for daguerreotypes, a silver medal.

Sanxay & Chalmers, for ambrotypes, a silver medal.

E. Powers, for ambrotypes and photographs, first class diploma.

John F. Chalmers is not listed in other photographic directories.

Mr. Bush

1852-1853       77 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.[1]

1853                Sycamore Street, Petersburg, Virginia.

Mr. Bush (probably Henry S. Bush) was recorded in one announcement that appeared on March 31, 1853 in the Wheeling Daily Intelligencer (Wheeling, Virginia).  Mr. Bush, the Daguerrean agent of Whitehurst’s Gallery in Petersburg, Va., died suddenly on Friday.

Mr. Bush is recorded as Henry S. Bushin Craig’s Daguerreian Registry working for Jesse Harrison Whitehurst in Richmond, Virginia in 1852-1853. 


[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

A. Watson

1857                83 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

1857-1859     77 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

A. Watson is a complicated entry.  There are a total of twenty six advertisements and two announcements that were recorded from The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Two advertisements and two announcements mentioned a Watson & Son, one of the announcements is recorded as Mrs. Watson and Son.  This is possibly a typo but further research is needed.  There are also a number of advertisements between December 8, 1857 to November 21, 1859 that only mention Watson.  The identification of the son is not recorded in any of the ads or announcements recorded.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does mention John W. Watson as being active in Richmond in 1859, it is possibly that he is the son.

 1.  Advertisement ran on October 23 & 24, 1857.  Genuine Double Glass Ambrotype Picture For 50 Cents, At Watson’s Melainotype And Ambrotype Gallery—On Friday, 23d Oct.—Fine Ambrotype Views of Niagara, taken on the spot by A. Watson.  Visitors wishing a view of the Falls, can secure a most accurate and imperishable mirror of the greatest cataract in the world.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine their specimens, as they need only to be seen to be appreciated. 

Remember, Watson intends to give his first week’s profits for the benefit of the poor of Richmond.  Pictures taken from 25 cents to $10.                                                                       

2.  Advertisement ran from October 26 to 31, 1857.  Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes, only 25 Cents.—Be sure and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25 and 37½ cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of this city.                                                                                                                 

3.  Advertisement ran from October 31 to November 27, 1857.  Watson’s Gives The Largest Ambrotypes, For Fifty Cents—Call and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25, 37½, and 50 cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of the city.                                                                                             

4.  Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 10, 1857.  Proclamation.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case a Watson’s Gallery, 83 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.—Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best pictures taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                          

5.  Advertisement ran from December 8 to 10, 1857.  Removal.—Watson & Son have bought out the old Whitehurst Gallery lately occupied by Mr. Leitch, which they will open on Monday December 7, and are now prepared to take Pictures from 25 to 37½ cents with cases; and extra large for 50 cents with case, which are not to be equaled in the city, and which is regularly charged $1.  Medalions, Cameos, Maianotypes, and Panotypes, which can be sent in a letter to any part of the world.  His Ambrotypes are warranted not to fade.

Remember the old Whitehurst Gallery, 77 main street, Call and see for yourselves, his specimens, and where Photographs of all the United States Senators can be seen.              

6.  Advertisement ran from December 11 to 28, 1857.  Old Whitehurst Gallery.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case at Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and Cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.  Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best picture taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                  

7.  Advertisement ran from December 28m, 1857 to January 28, 1858.  $500 worth of Jewelry and Fancy Cases received by the Jamestown for Watson & Son, for New Years’ Gifts.  A handsome case and picture for $1, which is regularly charged elsewhere $2 for.  What you buy at other places for $1 we give you for 50 cents.  Pictures from 25 cents up to $10.  Groups taken in large cases and charged as single ones.  Union case, with picture, for $1.  Melainotypes, Panotypes, and Ambrographs sent by mail for single postage.  Pictures for Lockets, Breastpins and Rings taken; and old Daguerreotypes copied.  Pictures taken rain or shine, 20 per cent cheaper than any other gallery.—Good fires always kept.  At Whitehurst’s old Gallery, No. 77 Main street                                                                                    

8.  Advertisement ran from January 27 to March 1, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow, Ere The Substance Fade.”—If you wish a fine picture, call at Whitehurst’s old Gallery, (the best skylight in the city,) and examine the specimens of art produced by Watson.  They are warranted not to fade, nor to be easily defaced—equal to the best in the United States, and 20 per cent cheaper than any other in the city.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M. to 5 P. M.  Pictures copied, and either enlarged or diminished.

Melainotypes and Penotypes, for transmission by mail.

Photographs, 1st sitting, $2; Duplicates $1 each.

Remember, 77 Main street.

9.  Advertisement appeared on March 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fail.”—At Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main street.  Photographs, either colored or plain, made from life, copied from Daguerreotypes or smaller pictures, and enlarged to any size.  Watson’s Ambrotypes, Maleinotype, Panotype, Ambrograph and Nelograph, a new style of Photograph, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes for letters, and are of a superior character. Colored or plain, and for beauty of finish are surpassed by none.  Pictures taken for 50 cents; Photographs 32 ; Duplicates $1.

Photograph of the Washington Monument, with Jefferson and Patrick Henry, for sale.  Price $1.

10.  Advertisement ran from March 6 to April 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fade.” If you wish a good picture go to  Whitehurst’s old Gallery, 77 Main st. and examine the Specimens, Photographs, colored or plain, made from life or copied from small pictures and enlarged to any size.  The pure Ambrotype we warrant not to fade or easily be defaced.  Watson’s unrivalled Niellograph or new style of Photograph pictures, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes.  Malainotypes, Panotypes and Ambrotypes for transmission by mail.  This gallery contains two of the largest skylights in Virginia, and for beauty of finish, his pictures are surpassed by none.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M., to 5 P. M.

Old Daguerreotypes copied.                                                                                      

11.  Advertisement ran from June 29 to August 3, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes pictures from 50 cents to $1, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil. The painting to be done by a first class Portrait Painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery, suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good pictures, an advantage, not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

12.  Advertisement ran from September 14 to October 14, 1858.  Watson has just returned from the springs, and will be happy to see his old friends and show them some of his celebrated Chrystal Miniatures, which will neither fade or rub out.

Life-size Pictures, in oil or pastille, at the shortest notice.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $100.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

13.  Advertisement ran from October 16 to November 15, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $1.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamers.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

The first announcement appeared on October 29, 1858.  The Mechanics’ Fair increases in interest, day by day…But, apart from these, are five specimens of sewing machines, always at work, while near them may be seen the photographic displays of Minnis and Watson, that of themselves are worth a visit….

The second announcement appeared on November 10, 1858.  The Fifth Annual Exhibition Of The Virginia Mechanics’ Institute…List of Premiums, Awarded by the Virginia Mechanics’ Institute, at its Fifth Annual Exhibition…

Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes And Photographs.  Class No. 26.—

G. W. Minnis, for his collection, silver medal

Mrs. Watson & Son, for pictures on leather, honorable mention.

The Photographs by Fredericks, of New York, are very superior, but were entered too late for a premium.  The Committee of Judges, however, deem them worthy of high commendation.

14.  Advertisement ran from November 15 to December 18, 1858.  What’s The News?—Watson, at Whitehurst’s old gallery, 77 main street, is going to Europe, and is selling off his stock of fine Cases at cost, and he gives you a large sized Ambrotype for 50 cents—sold at $1 in any other gallery.

Photographs from $2 upwards.  Pictures put in medallion and breastpins for 75 cents.

Good fires constantly kept.                                                                            

15.  Advertisement ran from December 16 to 29, 1858.  Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.      

16.  Advertisement ran from December 30, 1858 to January 15, 1859.  Look Out.—Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.                                                                                 

17. Advertisement ran from January 26 to February 16, 1859.  Good and Cheap Pictures—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                         

18.  Advertisement ran from February 17 to March 9, 1859.  Positively Only For Two Weeks Longer—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

Advertisement ran from March 10 to 29, 1859.1859 March 10.  The Daily Dispatch.  (Richmond, Virginia.)  March 10, 1859, Vol. XV, No. 59, P. 2.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery will open on the 14th inst, with an entire new stock of Cases, from 35 Cents and upwards.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

19.  Advertisement ran from March 21 to April 20, 1859.  Gallery Of Fine Arts, 77, Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.  Important Notice.

Watson feels it due to his patrons and the public to tender them his warmest thanks for the generous support they have favored him with since he opened the above Gallery, and desires to inform them that circumstances has arisen which has induced him to abandon the project of returning to Europe for the present; and he is now receiving an entire new stock of cases of the best quality, which he is determined to sell at New York prices; and he intends to double his efforts to please all who may favor him with their patronage.

Every variety of picture produced by the Photographic art to be seen at his Gallery, which for style and workmanship, is equal to any produced in the city.  Here you can have a picture of surpassing beauty and size for 35 cents—unequalled by any other house—while Photographs, whole size 8 inches by 6 for $3; duplicates $1.  The public are invited to call and judge for themselves.

One Quarter size Camera, nearly new, for sale.                                            

20.  Advertisement ran from April 27 to May 14, 1859.  Great Excitement—By Telegraph—Watson, 77 Main street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

21.  Advertisement ran from May 16 to 27, 1859.  Remember Watson—Whitehurst’s Gallery, 77 Main street—from Boston, Old England, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

Photographs, life size, colored in oil, or pastel, and copied from old Daguerreotypes and enlarged.                                                                                                           

22.  Advertisement ran from May 28 to June 23, 1859.  Grand Exhibition—Free—At Watson’s, (Whitehurst’s Old Gallery,) 77 Main st.—The public has no occasion to go to Europe to see Rome, the Holy Land, Paris or London, for he is constantly receiving views which are more perfect than scientific men ever dreamed of, for the perspective is perfect.  The finest statuary in the world; groups from life; views by gas light; views of the moon.  The whole for exhibition and for sale.  Call and see them.

Photographs for $1.

Ambrotypes from 35 cts upwards.

Pictures life size, copied or taken from life                                                   

23.  Advertisement ran from July 14 to August 18, 1859.  Great Excitement—25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.

24.  Advertisement ran from September 13 to October 13, 1859.  Selling Out To Leave, 50 per cent, Below Usual Price.—Great Excitement.25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.                           

25.  Advertisement ran from October 20 to November 19, 1859.  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main Street.  77 Main Street.  To Close Business, 77 Main Street.                                                                                

26.   Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 1, 1859.  By J. H. Diggs, Auct.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery.—Having concluded to close our business in Richmond, we shall sell at public auction, on Friday Dec. 2d, 1859, at 10 o’clock A. M., (if fair; if not, the next fair day, at our residence, 77 Main street, a collection of Oil Paintings, Pastell do., Photographs, and other Pictures; also , at the same time and place, will be sold a good collection of Furniture: Sofas, Tete-a-Tete, Mahogany Chairs, Mahogany Tables, Glass Cases, velvet Frames of Rosewood, large mirrors, Screens, Beds and Bedding, Bedsteads, one large sign, Window Drapery, a large stock of Cases and Chemicals, a lot of Gilt Frames, &c., &c.  The above goods will be on exhibition till day of sale at our rooms, 77 Main st., Whitehurst’s old Gallery.  Watson & Son.  J. H. Digges, Auct.                                           

A. Watson and Watson & Son are not listed in other photographic directories.  According to Craig’s Daguerreian Registry John W. Watson was listed as being at the Whitehurst gallery in 1859, could this be the son?    

G. A. Walden

1856                Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

1856                Rooms at Rose’s Hotel, Yorkville, South Carolina.

1856                Rooms at the Palmetto Hotel, Yorkville, South Carolina.

1856                Rooms at the Lindsay Building, Yorkville, South Carolina.

G. A. Walden was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements in the Yorkville Enquirer (Yorkville, South Carolina).  The first announcement appeared on September 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes!  We are requested to direct attention to the Advertisement of Mr. G. A. Walden, of Richmond, Va., who has taken rooms at Rose’s Hotel, and proposes in fine style and at reasonable rates, to “Ambrotype” our community.  We have examined several very fair specimens which are ample recommendations of Mr. Walden’s skill as an artist.  Give him a call.

The first advertisement ran from September 11 to 25, 1856.  Ambrotype and Ichtheonotype.  G. A. Walden, of Richmond, Va.  Would inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity that he has taken rooms at Palmetto Hotel, where he is prepared to execute these beautiful pictures in the highest style of the art.  The Ambrotype is taken on glass, and unlike the Daguerreotype, without being reversed.  They can be viewed in any position with distinctness, as they are free from the glare of the metallic plate.  They cannot get dusty, and are impervious to water or acids, and cannot be tarnished or injured even by washing or rubbing, and will last for ages.  The superiority of these pictures in point of beauty and durability, has placed them at the head of the fine arts.

Possessing all the late improvements in the art, instruments and chemicals, he feels warranted in saying that his pictures shall be surpassed by none in the union. 

Portraits of deceased persons copied accurately.  Miniatures from life or paintings taken of any size.

Those only who have lost a dear relative or friend can know how much a Miniature is valued; and few think of this until it is too late.  Call, then, while an opportunity is afforded, for delays are dangerous.  These pictures can be taken in any weather, at a few moments sitting.  He warrants satisfaction, or no charge.

N. B.  Every Lady and Gentleman in the community is particularly invited to call and examine his specimens.  Call soon, as my stay will be short, owing to other engagements.

Instructions given in the Art of Ambrotyping, and apparatus furnished.  G. A. Walden.                  

The second announcement appeared on September 25, 1856.  Come One!  Come All!!  To Walden’s Daguerrean Gallery, in the Lindsay Building, and get an Ambrotype for One Dollar.  You can also have a nice Ambrotype out in your old Daguerreotype cases, for fifty cents.  Those who have daguerreotypes would do well to avail themselves of this opportunity, as his stay will be short in this place.  See advertisement in another column.                 

The second advertisement appeared on September 25, 1856.   Something New.  Ambrotype and Ichtheonotype.  G. A. Walden, of Richmond, VA.  Would inform the ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity that he has taken rooms in the Lindsey Building, where he is prepared to execute these beautiful pictures in the highest style of the art.  the Ambrotype is taken on glass, and, unlike the Daguerreotype, without being reversed.  They can be viewed in any position with distinctness, as they are free from the glare of the metallic plate.  They cannot get dusty, and are impervious to water or acids, and cannot be tarnished or injured even by washing or rubbing, and will last for ages.  The superiority of these pictures in point of beauty and durability, has placed them at the head of the fine arts.

Possessing all the late improvements in the art, instruments and chemicals, he feels warranted in saying that his pictures shall be surpassed by none in the union. 

Portraits of deceased persons copied accurately.  Miniatures from life or paintings taken of any size.

Those only who have lost a dear relative or friend can know how much a Miniature is valued; and few think of this until it is too late.  Call, then, while an opportunity is afforded, for delays are dangerous.  These pictures can be taken in any weather, at a few moments sitting.  He warrants satisfaction, or no charge.

N. B.  Every Lady and Gentleman in the community is particularly invited to call and examine his specimens.  Call soon, as my stay will be short, owing to other engagements.

Instructions given in the Art of Ambrotyping, and apparatus furnished.  G. A. Walden.  Sept. 15.

G. A. Walden is not recorded in other photographic directories.

William S. Shaw


1859                188 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

William S. Shaw was recorded in one advertisement that ran on December 29 & 30, 1859 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Duke’s Southern Photographic Temple Of Art, 188 Main st., cor. Above the Post-Office. Plain Photographs executed for $1 only; Duplicates $9 per doz.  Ivorytypes $10 and up.  Photographs in Indian Ink, pastel, Water Colors, and Oil, from miniatures to life size, on the most reasonable terms.

Mr. Wm. S. Shaw, late of London, who had the honor of being selected by the Protestant Episcopal Missionary Board to photograph the Bishops, Clerical and Lay Delegates of the Episcopal Church of America that met here in convention in October, Is now engaged at the Southern Photographic Temple of Art, and the public may rest assured they will be supplied with first class work in all branches of the art, equal to that of any other establishment in the Union—as Mr. Shaw is well known , and acknowledged one of the first photographers of this Country. Advertisement ran on December 29 & 30, 1859.

William S. Shaw is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Baltimore, Maryland in 1858, and 1858-59, and possibly in Richmond, Virginia in 1860.  

Ross J. Kelbaugh  records in Directory Of Maryland Photographers1839-1900, two listings.  The first entry “Shaw” is from The Photographic And Fine Arts Journal. November 1857, page 331.  Friend Snelling, — I promised to give you a full account of the Exhibition of Photographs and Ambrotypes, at the Maryland Institute Fair this year. Well there is plenty of material to go upon. First, Mr. P. L. Perkins has a grand display, better than last year, and the arrangement of his pictures are more tasteful.  He has life sized photographs painted in oil, some eight or ten; cabinet pictures also.  Mr. Shaw who has been operating at. this establishment, is a good workman and fully understands his business…

The second entry is “Shaw, W., photographer” S. Holliday near Fayette (1858-1859). 

Are they the same person I don’t know, more research is needed to make that determination.

R. C. Schofield

1852                151 Main Street, Eagle Square, Richmond, Virginia.

R. C. Schofield was recorded in one advertisement that ran from October 12 to November 3, 1852 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  The Beautiful Daguerreotypes executed by M. P. Simons speak for Themselves, (though this is not wonderful as they are speaking Likenesses,) they speak for themselves in tone, finish, composition and truth; they are not surpassed by those of this or any other country, in Paris, London and Venice, they are preferred to the best French, English and Austrian production, and at Home their merits are universally acknowledged.  Instances might be given to prove the above statement which would till the entire columns of the dispatch, but this would be expensive.

Be convinced by calling, examining and comparing specimens.  M. P. Simons, 151 Main Street, Eagle Square.        R. C. Schofield, Assistant.       

R. C. Schofield is not recorded in other photographic directories.

William Roads

1853                Rooms on Broad Street, Corner of 8th Street, Richmond, Virginia.

William Roads was recorded in one advertisement that ran from March 25 to 28, 1853 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Daguerreotypes.—Road’s Daguerrean Gallery.—Having opened a Gallery on Broad Street, corner of 8th, I would respectfully invite my friends, and the public in general to call and examine the beautiful specimens I have for exhibition.  Ladies and gentlemen, who are desirous of having their portraits taken in the best and most improved style of the art, should not fail to give me a call before trying elsewhere—and I warrant to give them cheap pictures, and such as will give full satisfaction.  Daguerreotypes of Children, of any age, taken in the very best style.  Wm. Roads, Corner of Broad and 8th sts.

William Roads is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Register as being active in 1855 in Richmond, Virginia with A. W. Osborne.

Rees, Blodget & Co.

1855                Main Street, Piper Block, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Rees, Blodget & Co. were recorded in two advertisements in the Worcester Daily Spy  (Worcester, Massachusetts).  The first advertisement appeared on October 18, 1855.  Take Notice!—Opposition to Steam Daguerreotypes, taken by a new American discovery, for only 25 cents, warranted to be of the best quality, and satisfaction given.  Something less than 500 taken daily.  No connection with the steam whistle, next door.  Rees, Blodget, & Co, artists.  Piper Block, Main st.

The second advertisement appeared on October 19, 1855.  Rees, Blodget, & Co. do not take Daguerreotypes by steam, as their noisy competitors boast to do, but at the same time give all who visit them good portraits, and at a quick rate, for 25 cents.  Rees, Blodget & Co. have opened their rooms at Piper’s Block, bent upon blowing up all steam boilers in the vicinity, if they burst themselves in doing so.

Rees and Blodget are both unknown and not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Worcester, Massachusetts.  One could speculate that Rees is Charles R. Rees based on an 1859 advertisement in the Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia) that claimed that he had 17 years experience in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Charleston, New Orleans and Cincinnati.  Rees left New York sometime around September 8, 1854.

Four days later on September 12, 1854 an advertisement appeared in The New York Herald.

Rees & Co., 25 Cent Daguerreotype Company, 385 Broadway.—This company, established under the above name, will be conducted hereafter under the [head] of McClave & Merritt, the original partners from [the commencement.]  The business will be conducted the same as usual, the whole company remaining with the exception of C. Rees, whose interest in this gallery has been purchased by the two remaining partners.  McClave & Merritt.

Where he went is unknown.  No record of his being in Boston is known.  The next advertisements found were from the Worcester, Massachusetts newspaper of October 19 & 20, 1855.  No other advertisements were found in Massachusetts newspaper prior to the above entries.  Over the next twelve day Rees advertised six times by himself.  The last advertisement in the Worcester Newspapers was on November 1, 1855.  At some point after leaving Worcester he probably worked with or for Tyler & Co. in New Orleans, Charleston and in 1858 in Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia.  So far the only mention of Rees being in South Carolina is from Harvey Teal’s Partners with the Sun South Carolina Photographers 1840-1940.  Teal states that Rees’s name appears in George S. Cooks papers in the Library of Congress as having an account with him but no address is attributed to the name.  Likewise there is no mention of in Photography in New Orleans The Early Years, 1840-1865.

Rees is an interesting person his association with Silas A. Holmes in New York and Tyler & Co. in Richmond and possibly other southern states deserves further research and a longer article.

L. Morse

1849                142 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts.

L. Morse was recorded in an advertisement that ran from January 11 to 27, 1849.  In the Worcester Daily Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts).  A Card.  That new beginner of the Daguerrean Art, who styles himself the “Skillful Artist,” and who alludes to ne as an “inexperienced youth,” should recollect that his own experience has not been very great, as it is well known that he took his first lesson of L. Babbit, only a few months since, and if any person by reading his advertisement should imagine he was a “skillful artist,” an examination of his types, would at once dispel the illusion.  Having the advantage of more practical experience and a better light, I engage to make a Better picture for Seventy-Five Cents, than can be made by any other 75 cent operator in this city.   L. Morse, 142 Main st.

L. Morse is not listed in other photographic directories as being active in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1849.  L. Morse is possibly L. H. Morse and also Leonard H. Morse.  L. H. Morse is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active at Whitehurst’s gallery in 1856 in Richmond, Virginia.  Leonard H. Morse is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1852 and 1854.