Category Archives: Sphereotype

D. M. Stoughton

1857-1858       Doctor Rawson’s Block, Findlay, Ohio.

D. M. Stoughton was recorded in four advertisements in The Hancock Jeffersonian (Findlay, Ohio).  The first advertisement dated April 10, 1857 ran on June 19 and 26, 1857, when he was by himself.

A New & Valuable Discovery. 

Enameled Photographs, 

Enameled Photographs,

Can Be Sent By Mail,

Can Be Sent By Mail,

To Any Part Of The World,

To Any Part Of The World,

Without Injury, or Extra Postage,

Without Injury, or Extra Postage,

And the only place where they can be obtained in perfection is at Stoughton’s, Stoughton’s Doctor Rawson’s Block, Stoughton’s old stand, where he can always be found, ready to wait upon his friends and customers,  having during the past season, repaired and refitted his rooms, he flatters himself that they now possess conveniences, both for himself and customers, superior to any in North-Western Ohio.  He never fails in executing Likenesses of children, by the aid of an improvement of his own, together with a powerful Sky-Light, he is enabled to take them at a sitting of only one second.—Enameled Photographs are superior to anything ever discovered, for locket pictures, &c.  Ambrotypes warranted not to crack.

N. B.—Instructions given in the art.  Findlay, April 10, 1857.

The second advertisement ran from July 17 to October 23, 1857 under the firm name of Stoughton & Hartsock.  Sphereotypes.  The undersigned would respectfully announce to the people of Hancock county that they have formed a co-partnership for the purpose of introducing the celebrated Patent Sphereotype!

This style of picture is unparalleled for beauty, and is acknowledged by all to be the greatest improvement of the age, in the Art Of Picture Taking!!

There is a softness and delicacy and beautiful, and which cannot be surpassed.  Call and examine their specimens.  They will also take Ambrotypes!  With all the latest improvements, together with pictures on paper, Cloth, Leather, &c.  Pictures taking on Leather In a recent discovery, and is very convenient for filing Lockets, or for sending any distance by mail in letters, which may be done without injury to the picture or extra postage.  By the aid of a Powerful Sky-Light, and excellent Chemicals, they are enabled to execute Pictures at a sitting of only one second; hence they seldom fail in getting the likenesses of Children.  Satisfaction warranted in all cases, both in regard to Price and Quality!!  And are determined not to be excelled.  They may be found at Stoughton’s old stand.  Stoughton & Hartsock.  Findlay, O., July 10, 1857.

The third and fourth advertisement appeared under the firm name of Stoughton & Reiterman.  The third advertisement ran on March 12 to October 15, 1858.  Stoughton’s. Ambrotype Gallery.  This establishment has been so long in operation, and its reputation is so well known by the people of Hancock and adjoining counties, that we presume it is not necessary to mention The Fact, that all the different styles of pictures are taken here, in a manner that Cannot Be Surpassed, and at low prices as they can be obtained at any other place.  There may be some, however, that are ignorant of these facts, and for their benefit they are mentioned.

Particular attention is called to our method of taking Likenesses on Leather, Card, Paper, &c. This is a convenient means of sending likenesses by leather, which can be done without extra postage.

Rooms in Doct. Rawson’s Block, opposite Ewing’s.  Stoughton & Reiterman.  D. M. Findlay, Ohio, March 5, 1858.

The fourth advertisement ran on October 15 & 22, 1858.  Stoughton’s. (Stoughton & Reiterman’s) Ambrotype Gallery.  This establishment has been so long in operation, and its reputation is so well known by the people of Hancock and adjoining counties, that we presume it is not necessary to mention The Fact, that all the different styles of pictures are taken here, in a manner that Cannot Be Surpassed, and at low prices as they can be obtained at any other place.  There may be some, however, that are ignorant of these facts, and for their benefit they are mentioned.

Particular attention is called to our method of taking Likenesses on Leather, Card, Paper, &c.

This is a convenient means of sending likenesses by leather, which can be done without extra postage.

Rooms in Doct. Rawson’s Block, opposite Ewing’s.  Stoughton & Reiterman.  Findlay, Ohio,

D. M. Stoughton, Stoughton & Hartsock and Stoughton & Reiterman are not recorded in other photographic directories.  W. Reiterman is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Findlay, Ohio in 1860.

T. Shaw

1859                Address Unknown, Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

T. Shaw was recorded in one announcement that appeared in The Jeffersonian Democrat (Chardon, Ohio) on October 7, 1859. List of Premiums Awarded by the Geauga Co. Agricultural Society at their Annual Fair for 1859….

Best show of sphereotypes, T. Shaw                          Dip.

Best show of daguerreotypes F. Ford                         Dip.

T. Shaw is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Chagrin Falls, Ohio in 1860.

S. T. Robinson

1857                Room of Mr. John Neal, adjoining R. P. Cunningham & Co.’s. Grocery Store,                                    Eaton, Ohio.                                                                                                                                  1857                Main Street, Opposite Stephens & Co.’s Store, Eaton, Ohio.

S. T. Robinson was recorded in two advertisements in the Preble County Democrat (Eaton, Ohio).  The first advertisement ran from May 21 to July 9, 1857.  Photography In Eaton.  The Subscriber respectfully announces to the citizens of Eaton and Preble County generally, that he has taken and entirely refitted the room of Mr. John Neal, adjoining R. P. Cunningham & Co.’s. Grocery, for taking Pictures.  He is prepared to take Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Sphereotypes, Stereotypes, Photographs or Mezzographs.

Having had several years experience in the Photographic Art, he flatters himself that he is  prepared to give satisfaction to all that may favor him with their patronage.

Prices—The Melainotype will be put up as low as 75 cents.                                                                Single Photographs, (whole size) $4; by the dozen, $10.                                                                          Color Photographs, $10 each.                                                                                                                               Lockets, Pins, Rings, of any size, filled.  S. T. Robinson.  Eaton, May 21.

The second advertisement ran from July 9 to August 20, 1857.  Photography In Eaton.  Persons wishing Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, Stereoscopes, or Photographs, will please call on the subscriber on Main street, opposite.  Pictures taken in all kinds of weather and on the most reasonable terms.

Copies enlarged and put up in the best of style.  Lockets, Pins, Rings, of the smallest size, filled.  S. T. Robinson.

S. T. Robinson is not listed in other photographic directories.  It is possible that this is the same person as J. T. Robinson (posted yesterday 11-6-20).

Robinson & Sample

1858                Osman’s Post Office Building, Ottawa, Illinois.

Robinson & Sample (S. T. Robinson & S. R. Sample) were recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in The Ottawa Free Trader (Ottawa, Illinois).  The announcement ran on April 24, 1858.  Pictures!  Pictures!!—Messrs. Robinson & Sample have just fitted up, in the new post office block (third story) a handsome suit of daguerrean rooms, where they are now ready to make copies of the “human face divine” in a style up to the finest touches of nature.  They appear to be adapts in the whole range of the photographic art.  They take daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, spereotypes, metanotypes, hallotypes, and we don’t know how many other types; at prices ranging from about nothing upwards.  Whether you can afford to have your handsome countenance perpetuated or not, go at least and see their pictures, for they are worth looking at.

The advertisement ran from May 1 to June 5, 1858.  Photography In Ottawa!  Robinson & Sample Would respectfully announce to the citizens of Ottawa and surrounding country that they have just fitted up a suit of rooms in Osman’s Post Office Building, where they are prepared to put up Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, Stereoscopes, Photographs, Hallotypes, &c., in the highest style of the art.  The public are respectfully invited to call and examine for themselves.

Perfect satisfaction given or no charge made.  Lockets, Pins, and Rings of all sizes filled.  S. T. Robinson,  S. R. Sample.

Robinson & Sample are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Stephen Remington

1857-1859      1 Clark’s Marble Block, corner Main & Madison Streets, Memphis, Tennessee.

Stephen Remington was recorded in nine advertisements and four announcements in the Memphis Daily Appeal (Memphis, Tennessee).  The first advertisement ran from January 1, 1857 to August 4, 1858.  The Sphereotype.  The latest and by far the most important improvement in Photography is the recently patented picture known as the Sphereotype, which is not only new and unlike any of its predecessors, but greatly superior to all.  The Sphereotype is proof against Time, Air, and Water, and for the richness of tone, warmth of expression and distinctness has to equal—in fact the illusion is such that the picture, or image, seems suspended in air, entirely independent of the background.

For this picture we have the exclusive right for Memphis.  Specimens can be seen in our Gallery, where pictures are also taken in the various styles by our Artist, Prof. Remington, who combines the chemist with the Artist, which enables him at all times to produce superior Pictures.  F. H. Clark & Co., No 1 Clark’s Marble Block.  dec2.

The second advertisement ran from January 1 to May 6, 1857.  Dissolution.  On the 1st June, 1856, the firm heretofore existing between F. H. Clark and A. C. Wurzach was dissolved by mutual consent.  F. H. Clark is charged with the settlement of the business of the late firm of F. R. Clark & Co.  F. H. Clark.  A. C. Wurzbach.  New Firm… of F. H. Clark & Co.  F. H. Clark,  Jas. S. Wilkins, Thos. Hill.

A Card.  Our New Firm…Established 1841….Our leading branches are, first—Watches,…Jewelry….Guns, Guns….Pistols,…Silver Goods….Silver Plated Goods…Cutlery…Our Mechanical Branch…..Engraving…

Our Daguerrean Gallery, Prof. Remington, Artist, Embraces a suit of rooms built expressly for the purpose, and we are prepared to furnish our customers with first class pictures in all the various styles.

In building expressly for our business, we have combined every convenience for the different branches, and greatly reduced our expenses, which, with our facilities and the extension of our business, enables us to sell goods and do work on the most reasonable terms.  Goods cheerfully shown and fairly represented, and we invite all, both buyers and the curious, to drop in without ceremony and examine our stock.  We keep open house for all.   F. H. Clark & Co.  oct16.

The first announcement appeared on March 13, 1857.  At Clark’s Daguerrean Gallery is a colored Photograph of Mr. Fray, the artist, colored by himself and taken by Mr. Remington, which is as perfect and beautiful a likeness as one will see anywhere.  It is a large, but not a full size.  Mr. Frye has also painted several other likeness of well-known citizens, among others a most perfect portrait of Fletcher Lane, Esq., and one of James Elder, Esq., Michael Magevney, Esq., etc.

The second announcement appeared on June 6, 1857.  Gen. Walker was again called to stand up and show himself, so as to give all an opportunity to see him, and he appeared a few moments on the stand, bowing modestly to the excited and enthusiastic multitude.

After the reception had concluded, General Walker was conducted in an open carriage to Clark’s Daguerreian Gallery, where Professor Remington succeeded in getting two very excellent likenesses of him—one a photograph and the other an ambrotype.  We understand it is his intention to multiply copies of the photograph and place them in the reach of all who wish a copy….

The third advertisement ran from June 6 to July 8, 1857.  Gen. Walker.  On Monday, June 8, will be issued at F. H. Clark & Co.’s Gallery, copies of Prof. Remington’s Photograph of Gen. Walker, the only original picture of him in Memphis.

The third announcement appeared on October 9, 1857.  The Zoonograph.  The superiority of the Ambrotype over the Daguerreotype is universally acknowledged, and they in their turn are totally eclipsed by the Zoonograph, which is the result of a new chemical process discovered by Professor Remington, and perfected after much labor and perseverance.

These pictures are more clear in their outlines, brilliant in tone, life-like in expression, durable, richly-colored and elegantly finished, than any style of Photographic picture that it has ever been our pleasure to examine critically.

Clark’s Gallery contains everything requisite, every convenience and facility that can be desired or obtained to execute in the most perfect manner any of the various styles of photographic work.  It will richly repay a visit, and especially so to those who desire artistic pictures.

We can also assure the public that Prof. Remington is in possession of several processes and materials in his art, that no other establishment in this part of the country commands.  As a consequence, he is enabled to give a beauty, finish and life to his pictures that we shall in vain look for from other artist.

Give him a call and judge for yourselves.  Clark’s marble Block, Corner Main and Madison streets.  sep29.

The fourth advertisement ran from November 12 to December 18, 1857.  Premium Pictures!  The Zo-onograph!!  The superiority of the Ambrotype over the Daguerreotype is universally acknowledged, and they in their turn are totally eclipsed by the Zo-onograph, which is the result of a new chemical process discovered by Professor Remington, and perfected after much labor and perseverance.

These pictures and all the styles known to the art are taken by Professor Remington, in the new operating room of F. H. Clarke & Co.

The fourth announcement appeared on January 17, 1858.  A Mammoth Photograph.—We were yesterday shown a fine photograph of the gifted young tragedian, Edwin Booth, taken by Remington at Clark’s Gallery.  This picture is the best that we have seen coming from the same hands, and will, we think, compare with the best photographs executed at the North.  It is a large picture—12×14 inches—and photographs the character of the subject to the life.  We understand that Remington has just added a new improvement to his much admired Zoonograph, which he styles the Crayon Zoonograph.  Everybody should see his specimens before procuring pictures at other establishments.

The fifth advertisement appeared on December 21, 1858.  F. H. Clark & Co.’s. Column.  Watchmakers, Jewelers, Silversmiths, And Engravers, Importers And Dealers In Watches, Clocks, Silver and Plated Ware, Guns, Fancy Goods, Jewelry, &c.

New Goods…Fine Goods…Watches…Jewelry…Silver Ware…Clocks…Guns, Guns!… Spectacles…Cutlery…Engraving…

Our Picture Gallery—Professor Remington, Artist, Is one of the most extensive in the Union.  Superior Pictures taken in all the various styles known to the Photographic art.  The Sphereotype and Remington’s Zoonographs, are worthy of special notice.

J. O’B. Inman[1] This Celebrated Artist.  This Celebrated Artist has permanently located in one of our rooms connected with our Gallery, with whom we have made arrangements to color in oil Remington’s Cabinet size Canvas Photographs.

These pictures combining as they do, the skill of the two Artists, are among the most perfect specimens of the Art.  No. 1 Clark’s Marble Block.

The sixth advertisement ran from October 9 to 15, 1859.  Clark & Remington’s Gallery, No. 1 Clark’s Marble Block.—Photographs from Miniatures to life size, colored in oil or water colors.  Ambrotypes and sphereotypes.

The sixth advertisement ran from October 9 to 15, 1859.  Clark & Remington’s Gallery, No. 1 Clark’s Marble Block.—Photographs from Miniatures to life size, colored in oil or water colors.  Ambrotypes and sphereotypes.

The seventh advertisement ran from October 18 to November 8, 1859.  Ivorytypes!  Ivorytypes!!  Clark & Remington’s Gallery.—The greatest improvement ever invented, having all the softness and brilliancy of color peculiar to the genuine ivory miniature, and at prices within the reach of all, taken Only at Clark & Remington’s mammoth sky-light gallery.  Also photographs, sphereotypes and ambrotypes.

The eighth advertisement ran from November 20 to December 17, 1859.  Everybody visits Clark & Remmington’s famous Gallery of Art.  Their Ivorytypes, Photographs, Sphereotypes and Ambrotypes are works of art.  Perfect pictures and warranted to please.  Remember the place—Clark & Remmington’s mammoth sky-light gallery, corner Main and Madison streets.

The ninth advertisement ran from December 14 to 25, 1859.  Christmas Gifts.—Clark & Remington have just received a large assortment of fine pearl, velvet and gilt cases, especially intended to supply the demand for their pictures as Christmas approaches.  Our prices will be found to suit all who wish good and durable pictures—Ivorytypes, photographs, miniatures in oil, ambrotypes, etc.  Look in and examine specimens, corner of main and Madison streets.

Stephen Remington is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as a possible daguerreian in the partnership of F. H. Clark & Co. in 1859-1860.   Reading the advertisements and announcements Clark is the owner of the business that has a photograph Gallery in it.

[1] The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1564-1860 list his full name as John O’Brien Inman.

W. B. Ranger

1857-1859       Main Street, Geneseo, New York.

W. B. Ranger was recorded in four advertisements in the Livingston Republican (Geneseo, New York). The first advertisement ran from October 29, 1857 to March 18, 1858. Pictures!  Pictures!  Take Notice, And Profit Thereby.  Great Photographic Gallery In Geneseo.  Two Large Rooms Combined.  Geneseo not only takes the head of being one of the finest towns in Western New York, But in the Fine Arts Ranger & Geiger’s Photographic Gallery produces the finest, boldest most natural and life-like likenesses.  Their Ambrotypes, Meininotypes, Cameotypes, Sphereotypes, and pictures taken on patent leather are superior to any taken elsewhere.  Our pictures are not only the best, but they are the cheapest.  Here you can get a good picture in a neat case For Fifty Cents And upwards.  We have now on hand the largest and best variety of Stock, both Plain and Fancy Cases, of every style and quality.  Miniatures taken in a clear and cloudy weather, and inserted in Lockets, Pins, Rings, Bracelets, Frames, &c., &c.  Pictures taken any size from that of a pea to the very largest size, and warranted.  Views of Residences take; also Miniatures of the sick or dead, at their residence if desired.  Copying of every description done in the best possible manner, and on short notice.

Instructions given in the Art, and Apparatus furnished on reasonable terms.  Strangers and citizens are requested to call and examine specimens.  Don’t forget the place, West side of Main St., Geneseo.  Rooms open from seven, A. M., until six P. M,.  W. Ranger.   J. Geiger.

The second advertisement ran from May 26 to August 11, 1859.  Ranger’s Photographic And Fine Art Gallery, Now Open.  I would say to the citizens of this town and surrounding country, that I have returned and taken charge of the old Daguerrean Gallery, West side of Main street.

Photographs, Ambrotypes, Cameotypes, Grained Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Pictures on Patent Leather, Taken in the highest style of the art.

All who want pictures give me a call, and I will give you as good work as can be obtained elsewhere.  Pictures of sick or deceased persons taken at their residences; old Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, or Paintings, taken and enlarged.

Citizens and Strangers are invited to call and examine work, whether they wish to purchase or not.  Satisfaction given, and all work warranted.

Through instructions given in the art, and apparatus furnished.  Don’t forget the place, west side Main Street, Geneseo.   W. B. Ranger.  my. 12.

The third advertisement ran from August 25 to December 8, 1859.  Photographs, Photographs.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Crayon Pictures!  Pictures On Gutta Percha!  To send to friends in a letter, without extra postage.

Diaphaneotypes, Old Daguerreotypes, Paintings, &c., Copied.                                                Pictures of Deceased Or Sick Persons, Taken At Their Residences.

In fact, all kinds of Pictures that are known to the Photographic Art, that have been proved, taken in the highest style, and finished in the most durable manner Where?  Why, At Ranger’s Premium Photograph Gallery!  Geneseo, August 18, 1859.

The fourth advertisement ran from October 27 to December 8, 1859.  Attention.  Stereoscopes and Stereo Pictures.  Something that every family should have in their parlors for their own gratification and to please their friends.  I would say to the public that I have on hand the Stereo Pictures, and Stereoscopes, which I shall sell at the lowest possible rates.  Views of all the principal points of interest in the world furnished to order, at city retail prices.  I shall keep constantly on hand a variety of pictures and instruments of different prices.  Call and see them at Ranger’s Photographic Gallery, Main St., Geneseo.  oct. 20.

W. B. Ranger is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Ranger & Geiger

1857-1858       Main Street, Geneseo, New York.

Ranger & Geiger (W. B. Ranger & J. Geiger) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from October 29, 1857 to March 18, 1858 in the Livingston Republican.  (Geneseo, New York).  Pictures!  Pictures!  Take Notice, And Profit Thereby.  Great Photographic Gallery In Geneseo.  Two Large Rooms Combined.  Geneseo not only takes the head of being one of the finest towns in Western New York, But in the Fine Arts Ranger & Geiger’s Photographic Gallery produces the finest, boldest most natural and life-like likenesses.  Their Ambrotypes, Meininotypes, Cameotypes, Sphereotypes, and pictures taken on patent leather are superior to any taken elsewhere.  Our pictures are not only the best, but they are the cheapest.  Here you can get a good picture in a neat case For Fifty Cents And upwards.  We have now on hand the largest and best variety of Stock, both Plain and Fancy Cases, of every style and quality.  Miniatures taken in a clear and cloudy weather, and inserted in Lockets, Pins, Rings, Bracelets, Frames, &c., &c.  Pictures taken any size from that of a pea to the very largest size, and warranted.  Views of Residences take; also Miniatures of the sick or dead, at their residence if desired.  Copying of every description done in the best possible manner, and on short notice.

Instructions given in the Art, and Apparatus furnished on reasonable terms.  Strangers and citizens are requested to call and examine specimens.  Don’t forget the place, West side of Main St., Geneseo.  Rooms open from seven, A. M., until six P. M,.  W. Ranger.  J. Geiger.

W.  B. Ranger and J. Geiger are not listed in other photographic directories.

W. H. Phares

1859               Address Unknown, Red Wing, Minnesota.

W. H. Phares was recorded in two announcements and one advertisement that appeared in the Red Wing Sentinel (Red Wing, Minnesota).  The first announcement ran on August 20, 1859.  “A Thing of Beauty Is a joy forever,” and some things that are not beautiful, are rendered so by the magic skill of Mr. W. H. Phares, an experienced artist, who has taken for a short time the rooms formerly occupied by Mr. Going, where he is prepared to execute in the highest style of the art, Ambrotypes, Sphereotypes, Melaineotypes and Photographs, at prices which cannot fail to give satisfaction.  If you have a father, mother, sister. brother or dear friend, whom you love, and whose image you wish to preserve, now is the time to “secure the shadow ere the substance fades.”  Mr. Phares will remain in town about a week longer.

The advertisement ran from August 20 to 27, 1859.  Premium Ambrotypes and Photographs.  W. H. Phares, Respectfully informs the citizens of Red Wing and vicinity, that he has taken Mr. Going’s rooms for two weeks, where he will put up his inimitable Life Like Pictures!  for those who will favor him with their patronage.  Pictures Taken In All Kinds Of Weather—of adults from 8 A. M., to 5 P. M., of Children, from 10 A. M. till 2 o’clock, clear weather.

They are all warranted not to change.—Please call and examine specimens.  W. H. Phares, Artist.

The second announcement appeared on August 27, 1859.  The Last Chance.  Remember the Mr. Phares will remain in Red Wing but three or four days longer, during which time he will be happy to furnish his inimitable life-like pictures to all who wish them.  Don’t neglect this opportunity, you may not get another very soon.  Mr. Phares is a good artist—a merit which all daguerreans claim, but one which few are entitled to.  His rooms are those formerly occupied by Mr. Going.

W. H. Phares is not recorded in other photographic directories.

R. D. Newton

1857-1858       Rooms over C. S. Wood’s Drug Store, Greene, New York.

R. D. Newton was recorded in three advertisements and three announcements in The Chenango American (Greene, New York). The first advertisement ran from March 26 to December 3, 1857. Ambrotype, Pearlotype, Melanotype, Spherotype and Daguerreotype Gallery, at Greene, N. Y.

The subscriber would respectfully inform the citizens of Greene, and vicinity, that he has permanently located himself at the rooms over C. S. Wood’s Drug Store, which he is re-fitting in good style, where he will be happy to receive calls.

He has a complete apparatus, capable of procuring the most finished and life-like pictures.  Having devoted several years to a careful study of the Art, added to an extensive experience, he is confident that he has attained a superiority as an Artist.  He has taken especial pains to procure the Latest Improvements, And is fully prepared to suit customers with any variety of likeness, from the old-fashioned Daguerreotype to the beautiful Spherotype Call and examine for yourselves.  You will be astonished, both at the beauty of his productions, and the moderation of his charges.  He would invite particular attention to his facilities for taking Ambrotypes and Spherotypes.

Trust nothing but your own eyes, and that you may have a fair opportunity to observe for yourselves, call at my room over C. S. Wood’s Drug Store, any time between 8 A. M. and 4 P. M. (Sundays excepted) and I will be happy to exhibit specimens.

N. B.—Particular attention paid to taking Childrens Likenesses, Groups &c.  Cloudy weather makes no difference; call at any time.  Instructions given in the art, and apparatus furnished.  I will also teach the beautiful Art of Grecian Oil Painting.  R. D. Newton, Greene.

The first announcement appeared on May 14, 1857.  Ambrotypes—R. D. Newton, at the Rooms over Wood’s Drug Store, is taking some beautiful Ambrotypes.  Call and see them, and examine for yourselves.

The second advertisement ran from December 10, 1857 to May 27, 1858.  New Arrangement!  Great Reduction Of Prices At Newton’s Picture Gallery!  At Greene, N. Y.  R. D. Newton, in returning his thanks for the very liberal patronage conferred upon him by the people of Greene and the surrounding country, would respectfully announce to the public that he offers greater inducements then heretofore to those desiring first class pictures.  Persons who do not like dull, lead colored pictures will do well to give him a call before going elsewhere, as pictures taken at my rooms cannot be excelled in the State, either in Brilliancy Of Tone Or in the clearness of the white parts.  Rest assured that every thing connected with this branch of business has received the careful attention of the Operator, and that his efforts to keep up with the latest improvements have been crowned with unrivalled success, among which may be found the Crayon Ambrotype, Vignette Ambrotype, Melanotype, Spherotype, Ornamented Borders Mirror Ambrotype, Ornamented Background, Double Figure, Etc.

To speak of the pleasing effects produced by those pictures at this time, I will omit, but invite you to call and examine specimens for yourselves.  The Ambrotype picture taken on Patent Leather is universally admired, and can be obtained at my rooms.  It can be placed in a letter and sent any distance free of extra charge.  Pictures set in Lockets, Breastpins and Finger rings for 50 cts.  Pictures copied. R. D. Newton. Greene, Nov. 10, 1857.

The second announcement appeared on April 8, 1858.  Ornamental.—Ocean Fire Company at their meeting on Tuesday evening last, added to the appearance of their assembly room, by placing on its walls the Ambrotype likeness of its members, fifty-four in number, contained in one large frame.  They were executed by R. D. Newton, of this village, and are fine specimens of artistic skill.

The third announcement appeared on April 15, 1858.  Attention.—Those who wish to procure Ambrotypes must call on Newton soon, as he intends to close his business in this village shortly.

The third advertisement ran from August 12 to October 21, 1858.  Ambrotype Gallery!  R. D. Newton, Announces to the public that he has re-opened his Ambrotype Gallery in this village, (over Drs. Wood’s Drug Store,) and is prepared, as usual, to furnish the best of Pictures.

The reputation of his Pictures is sufficiently established in this section, to need no “puffing” on his part.  They speak for themselves.

Particular attention paid To Copying Pictures.  Pictures taken in Lockets, Pins, Rings, &c., &c.  A style of Picture taken on Leather, just the thing to send by Mail to your friends abroad.  Prices ranging from 50 cents upwards.

R. D. Newton is not recorded as being active in Greene, New York. Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Russell D. Newton as being active in 1859 in Waverly, New York. The distance between Greene and Waverly, New York is about 160 miles and its possible they are the same person, but further research is needed.

J. W. McCormac

1856-1858       West side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, Clarksville,                                     Tennessee.                                                                                                                                1857                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                                  1858                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                              1857-1858       Gallery over the Northern Bank, Clarksville, Tennessee.

J. W. McCormac was recorded in six advertisements and ten announcements. The first advertisement ran from January 9 to November 18, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec. 5, ’56). Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50.             Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The first announcement appeared in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee)  on April 17, 1857.  The improvement and advancements that have been made, of late years, in the arts of Photographing and Daguerreotyping, are really astonishing, and they both seem now, to have reached perfection.  We have been led to this conclusion by seeing, within the past few days, some of the work in this art, by our friend, M’Cormac, whose gallery is over the late Democratic Reading Room—next door to the Northern Bank.  We do not hesitate to pronounce his work superior to any we have ever before seen.  He fully understands his business, and spares no pains nor expense to avail himself of every improvement in the art; and the result is that, for distinctness of impression, for tone, relief, attitude, naturalness, and high finish, his work is unsurpassed.  As we said before, we have lately examined some of it, and we were absolutely astonished at his excellence.  Every one who wants a picture of himself, or herself, or of any friend, should call on Mr. M’Cormac, at once, and procure it.  They will never have an opportunity to get a better one than he will take.  He has an elegant room, fine sky-light, first-class instruments, and every thing necessary to the execution of fine work; and his charges are moderate.  Call at his gallery, and see some of his elegant pictures, even if for no other purpose, for they are really most elegant specimens of a wonderful art.

We would say to mother’s particularly, that Mr. M’Cormac is singularly skillful and fortunate in taking pictures of children, and but rarely fails to get an excellent likeness.

The second advertisement ran from Oct 30 to November 13, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn from Mr. McCormac, the celebrated Photographist of Clarksville, that he intends paying us a visit soon.—He is a splendid artist and our citizens will have an opportunity of procuring a fine colored photograph equal to an oil painting.—Hop. Mercury.

The third advertisement ran from October 13, 1857 to October 8, 1858 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our friend McCormac, has attained to the ne plus ultra point, in the art of Daguerreotyping and photographing.  All who feel any interest in the fine arts, whether they want to invest anything in it or not, should call at Mr. McCormac’s gallery, and see to what great perfection he has arrived in his profession; and those who want a first-rate portrait of themselves or friend, should at once avail themselves of Mac’s ability to furnish the very best.

He has supplied himself with everything necessary to his profession, and is prepared to take photographs of every size—from miniature to life-size; and has secured the co-operative service of an excellent portrait painter, to color them from the living subject, and thus secure as good if not a far more accurate portrait than can be procured in any other way.

Mr. McCormac continues to furnish pictures of every other kind, of the very best quality, and at low prices.  In fact he can furnish good likenesses at prices ranging from one to one hundred dollars.  His gallery is on the second floor of the building next to the Northern Bank.

The fourth advertisement appeared on  October 30, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec.5, ’56).  Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50. Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The fifth advertisement appeared on November 13, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  M’cCormac’s Gallery of Photography In All Its Branches.  Pictures of every style and size taken.  Lowest price $1; highest price $75.  Persons having daguerreotypes of deceased friends can have them enlarged to Photographs of the size of life, and colored in oil on canvas or paper, with an accuracy not to be obtained in any other way.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.  Rooms west side of the Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct 1, ’57.

The second announcement appeared on November 20, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We are pleased to see that our clever friend and accomplished artist, Mr. S. W. Price, has returned to our city, to remain a short time.  We are shown a specimen of his skill, in the way of coloring upon the Photograph likeness of our Editor.  It is certainly a fine specimen of art.

If, with McCormac to take the picture, and Price to do the coloring, our senior’s face is not well taken, then there is no use in any one else trying.  In our opinion, this Photograph cannot be surpassed.

The third announce appeared on March 26, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our Friend McCormac is still taking some of the finest Photographic pictures that we have ever seen.  You should by all means pay a visit to his gallery.

On May 7, 1858 the fourth announcement appeared in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, the excellent Photographic artist, has returned from a visit to Hopkinsville [Kentucky] where he has been professionally engaged for a few weeks.  Let all who desire a good likeness, of any description, call and see him at his gallery over the Northern Bank.

The fifth announcement appeared on May 21, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Mr. Price is again in our midst Mr. Price is a painter of decided merit, and if evidence of that fact were wanting, his picture of that fact were wanting, his picture of Mr. Fillmore is sufficient to place the matter beyond a doubt.  Mr. Price is also a high-toned and honorable gentleman, and we bespeak for him a liberal share of patronage.  We presume he will resume his employment as colorer of Photographers for Mr. W. J. McCormac.  Success attend them both.

The sixth announcement appeared on October 15, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Among the many improvements of Science, There has perhaps been none more pleasing to us, than the beautiful art of Photography, the rapid strides it has made are surprising.  It is only a few years ago, since the Daguerreotype was the only kind of picture taken by the aid of chemistry; now there is the Ambrotype on glass; the Melainotype on iron; the Photograph on paper and a host of others.  The community are indebted to those gentlemen, whose persevering researches have perfected this most valuable art against scientific and chemical difficulties, that none but the initiated can rightly understand.

Certainly not last, or least of those “devotees of the Sun,” is our friend McCormac, whose work will stand comparison with that of any gallery North or South.  A visit to his rooms will prove that Clarksville is not behind the time in Photography, and his life size Photographs are perfect gems. This process is the most valuable of the whole art.  Daguerreotypes not larger than a small locket, are enlarged to the size of life.  A small “negative” copy is first taken, and then by the use of a powerful lens is magnified on canvass and permanently fixed there; it is then placed in the painters hands where, under the skillful brush, it grows to a beautiful and life-like picture—the drawing must be correct as it is done by the great limner the sun.

As a Photographer, Mr. McCormac stands in the first ranks of his profession, and has striven most earnestly to bring the Art to the highest state of perfection here in Clarksville.  We are much pleased to see that in fine weather his rooms are crowded daily.

The sixth advertisement from October 22, 1858 to December 23, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, Practical Photographist, makes pictures in every style of the art, from the smallest miniature up to life-size Photographs.—Instruction given in any or all of the branches.  Rooms west side Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct. 1, ’58.

The seventh announcement appeared on March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  “Secure the shadow ere the substance fade.”  Now that the weather has cleared off beautifully and Spring has taken the place of old winter, we would advise every one who wishes to preserve their own portraits or that of their friends to call immediately at MacCormac’s Photographic Gallery where he is prepared to get them up from , the smallest to life-size, in the very best style.  He has some of the best life specimens that can be produced anywhere Call and examine them.

The eighth announcement appeared on  March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  If you want a visiting card with your likeness on one corner, McCormac can furnish it.  This style is the “latest agony.” And there is an appropriateness in it which can not fail to impress those who see it.  The Likeness is a photograph, and can be multiplied indefinitely.

The ninth announcement appeared on July 15, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn that Mr. MacCormac intends starting for Europe next week, for the purpose of studying all the latest improvements in Photography.—WE wish his trip may bring him all the pleasure and profit his energy and enterprise most certainly deserve.  Mac stands deservedly high in his profession, and seems determined to spare no effort to keep ahead of all, in his beautiful art.  That’s the right spirit Mac, let the Allies and Austrians do the fighting, and you attend strictly to Photographing.

The tenth announcement appeared on October 28, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our artist-friend, McCormac, seems determined not to be behind any body in anything that pertains to his business.  His photographic gallery has long been known as a repository rich in gems of art, but its attractiveness has lately been greatly enhanced.  But few of our readers know to what expense and trouble Mr. McCormac has gone in perfecting himself in every department of the beautiful art to which he has devoted himself.  For years past he has studied it with zeal of an enthusiast, and availed himself promptly of every improvement made in it.  During the past summer he has visited most of our larger cities, and several in Europe, in all  of which he had free access to the galleries of art, and full communication with all artist of note in his line, thus adding largely to his own skill and knowledge, and perfecting himself in all the recent improvements in his profession.  Mr. McCormac deserves great credit for the manner in which he has labored to accomplish what he has done. And for the establishment here of a gallery of art that has done honor to the town; and he should be met with, and sustained by, the full patronage of the community.

He furnishes pictures in every style—from the smallest daguerreotype up to the life-size photograph—plain, or colored, at a very moderate charges; and when the life-like image of kindred and friends can be so easily obtained, no one should neglect to procure it.

J. W. McCormac is not listed in other photographic directories.