Tag Archives: Photographers

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth

1855                Address Unknown, St. Louis, Missouri

1855-1856       Rooms over Hicks’ China Hall, North side of public Square, Nashville,                             Tennessee.

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth of the firm Dodge & Wenderoth was recorded on one announcement in The Daily Nashville True Whig and five announcements and one advertisement in the Nashville Union and American.   The announcement in The Daily Nashville True Whig  (Nashville, Tennessee) appeared on September 29, 1855.  Photographic Miniature Portraits.—Art has achieved a signal triumph in the Introduction of crystalotype likenesses.  In the hands of competent artists, Photography is destined to supersede miniature painting on ivory altogether.  The process is simple and sure.  The likeness is first daguerreotyped on glass, and then transferred to a very fine paper, prepared especially for the purpose.  They are then colored to the life.  The likenesses thus taken has all the accuracy of a daguerreotype, and all the beauty and finish of a painting.  They are much larger than the ordinary miniature, and can be furnished at about one-fourth the cost of the latter.  We noticed that our old friend, J. W. Dodge, formerly of this city, and whose skill as a miniature painter is well known here, has been for some taking likenesses upon this plan.  He is associated with Mr. Augustus Wenderoth, one of the finest artist in the Country.  We have before us a highly complimentary notice of their pictures from the St. Louis Republican.

We are pleased to learn that Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth will be in this city early October, and will open rooms for a short stay.—With the high reputation which Mr. D. enjoys here, and the acknowledge talent of his associate, there can be no doubt that they will find a lucrative patronage ready for them.

The first announcement in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee) appeared on December 23, 1855.  The Fine Arts—Photographic Miniature Portraits.—We take pleasure in calling the attention of our readers to the card of Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth in this morning’s paper.  Mr. Dodge is well known in this community as an artist who has no superior in this country in his peculiar department—miniatures on Ivory.  Hundreds of his pictures are in the possession of persons in Nashville alone—and whoever has the likeness of a valued friend from his pencil has a “thing of beauty” which will certainly be “a joy forever.”  Mr. D. has associated with him Mr. Wenderoth, an artist of the highest accomplishment, as an examination of some of his specimens will abundantly satisfy anyone.  Together they will not only furnish our citizens with those inimitable miniatures on ivory—celebrated wherever known—but what will prove, we believe, even more acceptable, are to furnish Photographic Miniature Portraits—a style of picture which is destined to a very great extent to supersede all others.  They present at once the faithfulness and accuracy of the daguerreotype, together with the beauty, finish, naturalness and ease of an oil painting—which they in reality are, more than any thing else.  The photographic process transfers to paper the form and feature with unmistakable accuracy in the minutest particulars, while the delicate touch of the artist’s pencil—a pencil already famous even without this aid—brings out in bold and striking relief a counterfeit presentment of the subject, perfect almost beyond credulity.—This photographic process enables the artist to enlarge the size of their pictures, and to prepare them with less labor, as well as more accuracy, and consequently at a reduced cost.  We advise those of our readers who are fond of the beautiful in art, after giving the card of Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth a reading, to call and examine some of their specimens, of which they have a few.  We can guarantee to the most matter-of-fact individual that he will find something in them to excite emotions of pleasure, and that he will at once resolve to have himself or some friend “done up” in their inimitable style.

The advertisement ran from December 23, 1855 to March 26, 1856.  To The Public.  A Card.  The undersigned would respectfully announce to his friends and the citizens of Nashville and vicinity, that he has returned to the city for the purpose of pursuing his profession, and that he has associated with him the talented Artist, Mr. F. Augustus Wenderoth, and he feels assured, from their success in another State, that their efforts in their profession cannot fail to be received with favor by the lovers of Art in Tennessee.  John W. Dodge.

The Fine Arts—Photographic Miniature Portraits.  Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth would make known to the citizens generally, that they have taken Rooms over “Hicks’ China Hall,” North side of the Public Square, and are now prepared to execute (in addition to Miniatures on Ivory) the new Photographic Miniature Portraits.  These pictures are from Locket to Cabinet size, forming handsome ornaments for the Palor.  They possess the faithfulness of the mirror with the expression and coloring of life, and are Perfectly Permanent.

Painted Photographic copies of various sizes, taken of Daguerreotypes, when accompanied with a description of the complexion, color of the eyes, hair, dress, &c.  Specimens of the different styles, painted and plain, can be examine at their Studio.              

The second announcement appeared on February 15, 1856.  Photographs Of The Legislature.—Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, the distinguished artists, will take a Photographic view of the interior of the House of Representatives, with the members (and we presume their lady friends in the gallery,) this morning at 10 o’clock, if the day proves a favorable one.  If the day should be unfavorable, the picture will be taken on the first bright day following, at the same hour.  The interior of the Senate chamber will be taken on the day after that of the House, at the same hour, if the weather is fair.

The third announcement appeared on February 16, 1856.  Interior View Of The Hall.  Mr. Parks submitted a resolution which had just been put into his hands, inviting Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, Photographic Artists, (conformably to their application,) to take a Photographic Miniature of the House of Representatives at any time it may suit their convenience, and requesting the Door-keepers to extend to them the necessary freedom of the Hall and facilities for that object: and he moved that the rule be suspended for its consideration.

And, accordingly, the rule was suspended, and the resolution was adopted….

The Speaker read to the House a communication from Dodge, the Photographic Artists, stating that he would be prepared to take his interior view of the Hall to morrow (Friday) morning at 10 o’clock, if it should be a fair day; and, if not, on the first fair day following, at the same hour….

The fourth announcement appeared on May 16, 1856.  Photographic Miniature Portraits.  The studio of our friends, Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, over Hicks’ China Hall, north side of the square, has become the very general resort of that large class of our citizens of both sexes so justly celebrated for their high appreciation and liberal patronage of every thing truly excellent in the fine arts.  The reputation of Nr, Dodge alone as a miniature painter on ivory, in this city, where he has been so long and so favorably known, is of itself sufficient to attract all connoisseurs.  But there are other no less important features connected with his studio.  The introduction of the new style of pictures, known as Photographic Miniature Portraits, proves a most successful card.  These pictures, when painted, possess all the beauty of the ivory miniature, and, in addition, all the accurateness of outline and feature of the daguerreotype.  Besides they have the advantage in point of size, and are less expense in proportion.  Mr. Wenderoth is himself one of the most accomplished miniature painters in the country, as the specimens of his workmanship abundantly prove.  In the art of Photographing he is entirely au fait, and with his superior apparatus can exhibit pictures equal, if not superior, to any ever taken in this or any other country.

Mr. Dodge has recently returned from a visit to his family in the mountains, and is prepared, in connection with Mr. W., to attend to all orders.  Photographic Miniature Portraits can be readily taken from Daguerreotypes or Portraits.  We recommend those who wish to see something really superior to visit the studio of Dodge & Wenderoth.

The fifth announcement appeared on August 2, 1856.  Bank of Tennessee—Counter Notice.—We saw yesterday some specimens, of a new issue of the Bank of Tennessee, of the denomination of ten dollars, issued in lieu of their red brick tens, which have been withdrawn.  These notes are payable at the counter of the Bank here, and are being put in circulation in this city.  As specimens of Bank note engraving, they are equal, if not superior to any thing we have ever seen.  The face of the bill in on a yellow ground, and presents fine miniatures of Jackson, Polk, and Hon. Cave Johnson, President—the first two taken from J. W. Dodge’s Ivory Miniatures, and the latter from a Photographic Miniature by Dodge & Wenderoth….

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Nashville, Tennessee or in St. Louis, Missouri.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Frederick A. Wenderoth in Philadelphia in 1858-1860 he also list an August Wenderoth in San Francisco California and Charleston, South Carolina, it is unknow if they are the same person.

Wells, Miller & Co.

1857-1858       148 & 149 Church Street, Burlington, Vermont.                  

Wells, Miller & Company (Charles Miller) were recorded in two announcements and four advertisements in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  The first announcement appeared on October 9, 1857.  Chittenden County Fair…Works of Art…Wells, Miller and Co., Burlington—exhibited photographs, plain and touched in oils; Sphereotypes, and ambrotypes—all of high order.  These gentlemen are the successor of Mr. Parker, in the establishment on Church St.  Their pictures indicated both skill of the artist, and the improvement which is constantly going on in photographic art.

The first advertisement ran from October 16 to November 13, 1857.  Patent Sphereotypes, Patent Ambrotypes, Photographs. The only picture that will stand, Exclusive Rights, By Wells, Miller & Co.  Successor to T. M. Parker, 148 & 149 Church St., Burlington.

The second announcement appeared on January 8, 1858.  Holiday Presents.  If you wish to give a friend or relative a really appropriate Christmas or New Year’s Present, which cannot fail to be acceptable, go to Wells, Miller & Co.’s. on Church Street, and get one of the new patent Sphereotypes.

For Two Weeks prices of pictures will be low to accommodate all.

The second advertisement ran from March 19 to August 20, 1858.  Wells, Miller & Co., Would Call The Attention of Persons wishing accurate, durable and desirable likenesses, to the various styles of pictures taken by them at their Daguerrian Rooms and Portrait Gallery, Church Street, Burlington, Vermont.

Among which are Photographs, Sphereotypes, Ambrotypes, Melanotypes, Lettergraphs, &c.  Our Plain Photographs by an improved process we claim to be unsurpassed by any taken anywhere,—New York and Boston not excepted.  We furnish them also, beautifully finished in Oil, or India Ink, making the most beautiful and satisfactory likenesses known to art; and when several copies are desired, the cheapest pictures taken. 

Our Sphereotypes and patent Ambrotypes are unequalled.  We challenge comparison with them the Lettergraph is a picture taken on prepared cloth, of small size, very cheap, and very convenient for sending in a letter. 

The Public are desired to Take Particular Notice that we Own the Rights for Chittenden County, of the Sphereotype and Patent Ambrotype.—None are genuine without the Patent Mark.  People are cautioned against being humbugged by transient and irresponsible individuals into the purchase of pictures, which inferior at first, are sure to fade and become effaced by time. Our Ambrotypes and Sphereotypes are literally indestructible, except by violence or fire.

We pay particular attention to Pictures Of Children.  Infant’s likenesses taken in one second.  Bring the children along; we can take them; it is a sure thing with us.

We have the best rooms and the largest collection of specimens of our art in this State, and invite the Public generally to give us a call.  Wells, Miller & Co., Church st., Burlington, Vt.      

The third advertisement ran from July 2 to 30, 1858.  Where Did You Get That Picture?  Up At Wells, Miller & Co.’s.  The only pictures made on glass which are durable, are the patent Sphereotype and Patent Ambrotype.

Remember that, by using these Patents, we are able to make a much more prominent, brilliant and better picture, every way, and, as we say, the only Durable Picture; in saying so, we say what we know, as we have tested them to our entire satisfaction.  Wells, Miller & Co. have the exclusive right to use these Patents in this town and vicinity, and if any persons tell you that they make the Sphereotype or Ambrotype, they say what is not true.  And, of course, we shall not allow any one to infringe on them.  The Improved Ambrotype, so called, is worth but very little, and those who purchase them, will soon find out the fact.  They can be made cheap and will not last long; but if any person wishes to have such Pictures, we will make all they may want for 50 cents each.

Photographs made as well by any one in the country—colored in oil or touched with India Ink.

We have competent Copying Apparatus, for copying from small up to any size desired; we can copy up and color to nature, old and dim pictures which will soon be worthless, so that you can see your departed friends in life, as it were.

These Pictures Are As Permanent As Oil Portraits.

Please call at our Rooms, 146½ Church St., Burlington, and examine specimens.  Wells, Miller & Co.  Burlington, May 12, 1858

The fourth advertisement ran from August 20 to October 1, 1858.  Chittenden County Picture Gallery.  Wells, Miller & Co. [Successor to T. M. Parker.] Patent Sphereotype, Patent Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Lettergraphs, Photographs. Plain, In Oil or India Ink.  Pictures made as cheap as in any place in Vermont, and Far Better,

Please remember the place 147½ Church Street, Burlington, Vt.  Burlington, May 17, 1858.

Wells, Miller & Co. do not appear in other photographic directories.  Charles Miller is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Burlington in 1859-1860 (+).  Wells is unknown at this time.  One can speculate that it is Jeremiah D. Wells who was active in Northampton, Massachusetts, Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, Brattleboro Vermont, (which is over 150 miles away from Burlington) and possibly Port Jervis, New York.

A. Watson

1857                83 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

1857-1859     77 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

A. Watson is a complicated entry.  There are a total of twenty six advertisements and two announcements that were recorded from The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Two advertisements and two announcements mentioned a Watson & Son, one of the announcements is recorded as Mrs. Watson and Son.  This is possibly a typo but further research is needed.  There are also a number of advertisements between December 8, 1857 to November 21, 1859 that only mention Watson.  The identification of the son is not recorded in any of the ads or announcements recorded.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does mention John W. Watson as being active in Richmond in 1859, it is possibly that he is the son.

 1.  Advertisement ran on October 23 & 24, 1857.  Genuine Double Glass Ambrotype Picture For 50 Cents, At Watson’s Melainotype And Ambrotype Gallery—On Friday, 23d Oct.—Fine Ambrotype Views of Niagara, taken on the spot by A. Watson.  Visitors wishing a view of the Falls, can secure a most accurate and imperishable mirror of the greatest cataract in the world.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine their specimens, as they need only to be seen to be appreciated. 

Remember, Watson intends to give his first week’s profits for the benefit of the poor of Richmond.  Pictures taken from 25 cents to $10.                                                                       

2.  Advertisement ran from October 26 to 31, 1857.  Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes, only 25 Cents.—Be sure and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25 and 37½ cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of this city.                                                                                                                 

3.  Advertisement ran from October 31 to November 27, 1857.  Watson’s Gives The Largest Ambrotypes, For Fifty Cents—Call and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25, 37½, and 50 cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of the city.                                                                                             

4.  Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 10, 1857.  Proclamation.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case a Watson’s Gallery, 83 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.—Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best pictures taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                          

5.  Advertisement ran from December 8 to 10, 1857.  Removal.—Watson & Son have bought out the old Whitehurst Gallery lately occupied by Mr. Leitch, which they will open on Monday December 7, and are now prepared to take Pictures from 25 to 37½ cents with cases; and extra large for 50 cents with case, which are not to be equaled in the city, and which is regularly charged $1.  Medalions, Cameos, Maianotypes, and Panotypes, which can be sent in a letter to any part of the world.  His Ambrotypes are warranted not to fade.

Remember the old Whitehurst Gallery, 77 main street, Call and see for yourselves, his specimens, and where Photographs of all the United States Senators can be seen.              

6.  Advertisement ran from December 11 to 28, 1857.  Old Whitehurst Gallery.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case at Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and Cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.  Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best picture taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                  

7.  Advertisement ran from December 28m, 1857 to January 28, 1858.  $500 worth of Jewelry and Fancy Cases received by the Jamestown for Watson & Son, for New Years’ Gifts.  A handsome case and picture for $1, which is regularly charged elsewhere $2 for.  What you buy at other places for $1 we give you for 50 cents.  Pictures from 25 cents up to $10.  Groups taken in large cases and charged as single ones.  Union case, with picture, for $1.  Melainotypes, Panotypes, and Ambrographs sent by mail for single postage.  Pictures for Lockets, Breastpins and Rings taken; and old Daguerreotypes copied.  Pictures taken rain or shine, 20 per cent cheaper than any other gallery.—Good fires always kept.  At Whitehurst’s old Gallery, No. 77 Main street                                                                                    

8.  Advertisement ran from January 27 to March 1, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow, Ere The Substance Fade.”—If you wish a fine picture, call at Whitehurst’s old Gallery, (the best skylight in the city,) and examine the specimens of art produced by Watson.  They are warranted not to fade, nor to be easily defaced—equal to the best in the United States, and 20 per cent cheaper than any other in the city.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M. to 5 P. M.  Pictures copied, and either enlarged or diminished.

Melainotypes and Penotypes, for transmission by mail.

Photographs, 1st sitting, $2; Duplicates $1 each.

Remember, 77 Main street.

9.  Advertisement appeared on March 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fail.”—At Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main street.  Photographs, either colored or plain, made from life, copied from Daguerreotypes or smaller pictures, and enlarged to any size.  Watson’s Ambrotypes, Maleinotype, Panotype, Ambrograph and Nelograph, a new style of Photograph, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes for letters, and are of a superior character. Colored or plain, and for beauty of finish are surpassed by none.  Pictures taken for 50 cents; Photographs 32 ; Duplicates $1.

Photograph of the Washington Monument, with Jefferson and Patrick Henry, for sale.  Price $1.

10.  Advertisement ran from March 6 to April 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fade.” If you wish a good picture go to  Whitehurst’s old Gallery, 77 Main st. and examine the Specimens, Photographs, colored or plain, made from life or copied from small pictures and enlarged to any size.  The pure Ambrotype we warrant not to fade or easily be defaced.  Watson’s unrivalled Niellograph or new style of Photograph pictures, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes.  Malainotypes, Panotypes and Ambrotypes for transmission by mail.  This gallery contains two of the largest skylights in Virginia, and for beauty of finish, his pictures are surpassed by none.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M., to 5 P. M.

Old Daguerreotypes copied.                                                                                      

11.  Advertisement ran from June 29 to August 3, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes pictures from 50 cents to $1, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil. The painting to be done by a first class Portrait Painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery, suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good pictures, an advantage, not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

12.  Advertisement ran from September 14 to October 14, 1858.  Watson has just returned from the springs, and will be happy to see his old friends and show them some of his celebrated Chrystal Miniatures, which will neither fade or rub out.

Life-size Pictures, in oil or pastille, at the shortest notice.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $100.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

13.  Advertisement ran from October 16 to November 15, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $1.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamers.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

The first announcement appeared on October 29, 1858.  The Mechanics’ Fair increases in interest, day by day…But, apart from these, are five specimens of sewing machines, always at work, while near them may be seen the photographic displays of Minnis and Watson, that of themselves are worth a visit….

The second announcement appeared on November 10, 1858.  The Fifth Annual Exhibition Of The Virginia Mechanics’ Institute…List of Premiums, Awarded by the Virginia Mechanics’ Institute, at its Fifth Annual Exhibition…

Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes And Photographs.  Class No. 26.—

G. W. Minnis, for his collection, silver medal

Mrs. Watson & Son, for pictures on leather, honorable mention.

The Photographs by Fredericks, of New York, are very superior, but were entered too late for a premium.  The Committee of Judges, however, deem them worthy of high commendation.

14.  Advertisement ran from November 15 to December 18, 1858.  What’s The News?—Watson, at Whitehurst’s old gallery, 77 main street, is going to Europe, and is selling off his stock of fine Cases at cost, and he gives you a large sized Ambrotype for 50 cents—sold at $1 in any other gallery.

Photographs from $2 upwards.  Pictures put in medallion and breastpins for 75 cents.

Good fires constantly kept.                                                                            

15.  Advertisement ran from December 16 to 29, 1858.  Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.      

16.  Advertisement ran from December 30, 1858 to January 15, 1859.  Look Out.—Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.                                                                                 

17. Advertisement ran from January 26 to February 16, 1859.  Good and Cheap Pictures—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                         

18.  Advertisement ran from February 17 to March 9, 1859.  Positively Only For Two Weeks Longer—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

Advertisement ran from March 10 to 29, 1859.1859 March 10.  The Daily Dispatch.  (Richmond, Virginia.)  March 10, 1859, Vol. XV, No. 59, P. 2.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery will open on the 14th inst, with an entire new stock of Cases, from 35 Cents and upwards.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

19.  Advertisement ran from March 21 to April 20, 1859.  Gallery Of Fine Arts, 77, Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.  Important Notice.

Watson feels it due to his patrons and the public to tender them his warmest thanks for the generous support they have favored him with since he opened the above Gallery, and desires to inform them that circumstances has arisen which has induced him to abandon the project of returning to Europe for the present; and he is now receiving an entire new stock of cases of the best quality, which he is determined to sell at New York prices; and he intends to double his efforts to please all who may favor him with their patronage.

Every variety of picture produced by the Photographic art to be seen at his Gallery, which for style and workmanship, is equal to any produced in the city.  Here you can have a picture of surpassing beauty and size for 35 cents—unequalled by any other house—while Photographs, whole size 8 inches by 6 for $3; duplicates $1.  The public are invited to call and judge for themselves.

One Quarter size Camera, nearly new, for sale.                                            

20.  Advertisement ran from April 27 to May 14, 1859.  Great Excitement—By Telegraph—Watson, 77 Main street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

21.  Advertisement ran from May 16 to 27, 1859.  Remember Watson—Whitehurst’s Gallery, 77 Main street—from Boston, Old England, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

Photographs, life size, colored in oil, or pastel, and copied from old Daguerreotypes and enlarged.                                                                                                           

22.  Advertisement ran from May 28 to June 23, 1859.  Grand Exhibition—Free—At Watson’s, (Whitehurst’s Old Gallery,) 77 Main st.—The public has no occasion to go to Europe to see Rome, the Holy Land, Paris or London, for he is constantly receiving views which are more perfect than scientific men ever dreamed of, for the perspective is perfect.  The finest statuary in the world; groups from life; views by gas light; views of the moon.  The whole for exhibition and for sale.  Call and see them.

Photographs for $1.

Ambrotypes from 35 cts upwards.

Pictures life size, copied or taken from life                                                   

23.  Advertisement ran from July 14 to August 18, 1859.  Great Excitement—25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.

24.  Advertisement ran from September 13 to October 13, 1859.  Selling Out To Leave, 50 per cent, Below Usual Price.—Great Excitement.25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.                           

25.  Advertisement ran from October 20 to November 19, 1859.  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main Street.  77 Main Street.  To Close Business, 77 Main Street.                                                                                

26.   Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 1, 1859.  By J. H. Diggs, Auct.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery.—Having concluded to close our business in Richmond, we shall sell at public auction, on Friday Dec. 2d, 1859, at 10 o’clock A. M., (if fair; if not, the next fair day, at our residence, 77 Main street, a collection of Oil Paintings, Pastell do., Photographs, and other Pictures; also , at the same time and place, will be sold a good collection of Furniture: Sofas, Tete-a-Tete, Mahogany Chairs, Mahogany Tables, Glass Cases, velvet Frames of Rosewood, large mirrors, Screens, Beds and Bedding, Bedsteads, one large sign, Window Drapery, a large stock of Cases and Chemicals, a lot of Gilt Frames, &c., &c.  The above goods will be on exhibition till day of sale at our rooms, 77 Main st., Whitehurst’s old Gallery.  Watson & Son.  J. H. Digges, Auct.                                           

A. Watson and Watson & Son are not listed in other photographic directories.  According to Craig’s Daguerreian Registry John W. Watson was listed as being at the Whitehurst gallery in 1859, could this be the son?    

Upton & Smiley

1855-1856       45 Front Street, Bath, Maine.

Upton & Smiley (Benjamin Franklin Upton & Smiley) were recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Eastern Times (Bath, Maine).  The announcement appeared on November 8, 1855.  Photographs.—Messrs. Upton & Smiley, at the old Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. Upton, have recently introduced a photographic department to their establishment.  We have seen some specimens, colored in oil by Mr. Harris, which, for correctness of delineation and beauty of finish can’t be beat.  We say this without fear of contradiction, and any one who will take the trouble to visit the rooms, and examine the likeness of our venerable fellow citizen, Judge Clap, we are sure will agree with us.

The advertisement ran from November 29, 1855 to April 17, 1856.   Daguerreotypes By Upton & Smiley, 45 Front Street 45.

Benjamin Franklin Upton is recorded in other photographic directories but not in the partnership.  While Smiley is not recorded with a first name, this is possibly G. S. Smiley who was active in Brunswick, Maine in 1854.  For more information on Benjamin Franklin Upton see tomorrows post.  

Tileston, Randall & Co.

1859                50 Main Street, Evansville, Indiana.

Tileston, Randall & Co. (William W. Tileston, Charles M. Tileston and J. D. Randall) were recorded in five announcements in The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana).  The first announcement appeared on September 6, 1859.  Sun Beam Gallery.—Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., will open their new Sun Beam Gallery, No. 50, Main street, this evening easly gas light with a soiree.  Their friends and the public generally are invited to call and examine their suit of rooms for practicing the photographic art.

The second announcement appeared on September 8, 1859.  Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., Daguerreotypist, opened their handsome new Gallery, on Main street, on Tuesday evening, and entertained a pleasant and numerous company of ladies and gentlemen, who passed the evening in agreeable conversation, and examining the beautiful specimens of the art with which the rooms are adorned.  The gallery will be open every evening, and it will be found a pleasant place of resort for an hour.  The combined experience and talent of the three gentlemen will enable this company to produce the finest pictures in every department of the daguerreotyping and photographic art.

The third announcement appeared on September 21, 1859.  Persons wishing good Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, or Photographs, will bear in mind that the place to get them is at Tileston, Rondall & Co.s new Sun Beam Gallery, No. 50, Main street.  Their pictures possess beauty and delicacy of detail, combined with a rotundity rarely seen in Photographic expressions.  Remember that their gallery is kept open every evening until nine o’clock.  Call and examine their pictures by gas light.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 24, 1859.  The New Art Gallery.—Evansville, both at home and abroad, is noted for her commercial and manufacturing advantages; and truly in this respect she has not been underrated; but while steamers plough our waters, canal barges traverse our rich valleys, and railroads bear in their daily burdens, and all pour their rich stores into our lap of commerce; and although our forges and foundries and mills and factories ring with the hum of machinery and the song of labor, yet our people have not altogether forgotten to mingle the beautiful with the useful, in building up the fair fame of our city.

The growing taste of our people is evinced by the number and order of arrangement of our public libraries and cabinets; the improvements in architecture; the embellishment of public halls, saloons, business houses, churches, and private dwellings; the adornment of grounds; the advancement in music, and the polite modes and habits of our society.  And among the many other improvements in popular taste, none is more perceptible just now than the pleasure and satisfaction everywhere expressed at the recent fitting up by the Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., of their new Gallery of Art on Main Street.

Readers, have you yet visited the new rooms of these accomplished artists?  It is well worth a visit by the lovers of taste and the beautiful.  The main stairway entrance from the street is broad and inviting to the ascent.  It is open at all hours of the day, and till nine o’clock at night, and is then brilliantly lighted up with beautiful gas fixtures.  Arrived upon the second floor, you are ushered into an elegant apartment which combines the purpose of a saloon, sitting-room, and gallery of art.  Here you register your name in a book conveniently arranged for that purpose, rest awhile, if you like, on the comfortable sofas, and then look around at the pictures upon the walls.  From the floor to the ceiling is hung an endless variety of portraits, life-size photographs in oil, colored photographs, ambrotypes, sun pictures, stereoscopic views, groups, scenes, landscapes, and every style and variety of pictures known to the art.

After you have, of course, selected from the center table a case in which to have your own pleasant features mapped out, you pull a tasseled cord which hangs by the second stairway and the tinkling of a little silver bell above brings down one of the smiling young men, who usher you up into the chief operating room.  This chamber is forty feet long, by twenty in width, and is lighted by an immense sky light, in the center, over head.  The cameras and screens are so arranged, as that two sets of operators can work at the same time with equal effect, and the screens can be extended in any way on slides and hinges, so as to admit of a group of almost any size being taken, with a back ground of over twenty feet in width.

Before sitting for your picture, you step into a beautiful little alcove, fitted up in one corner, and modestly (!) drawing together the tasteful curtains, you find yourself before a large mirror, with all the other toilet paraphernalia, and you soon make yourself “good looking” enough to be “taken off” without breaking the camera lens.  The impression, with the “delightful expression” is done in a moment, and while your friends, the tall and affable Dan, and the sprightly and skillful Tileston Bros., are perfecting your ugliness in the dark room, you have time to look at the general arrangement.  At one end of the chamber is a large shop or working room, for doing the mechanical work of the establishment, and adjoining this is the dark room, fitted up with every possible permanent arrangement.

At the other end is a room, with large windows opening out to admit the sunlight, for photographic purposes.  Several smaller apartments adjoin, with “no admittance” marked over the entrance, into which, however, you will be “admitted” if you are good-looking, patronizing, and have an uncontrollable desire to poke your nose into all the mysteries of the art.  Your picture, by this time is ready; you are satisfied with it, pay for it, and descend into the lower gallery, where you take a card from a fanciful ocean shell-case on the center table, and descend to the street, wondering why everybody don’t visit Tileston, Randall & Co., Picture Gallery, and resolving to tell your friends so.  In short you are satisfied, after a visit, as we are, that this Gallery will hereafter not only afford pleasure and profit to our own people, but, that strangers, happening in the city, will visit these rooms, along with the other exhibitions of public taste and pleasure which adorn the flourishing city of Evansville.

The fifth announcement appeared on October 17, 1859, Vol. XII, No. 53, P. 1.

List of Premiums Awarded at the South-Western Indiana District Fair… Class No. 12—Art. 

Tileston, Randall & Co., of Vanderburgh, [County] best collection colored photographs, 1st premium, 5,00 and diploma.

Tileston, Randall & Co., of Vanderburgh, [County] best ambrotype and sun pictures, 1st premium, 5 00 and diploma.

Tileston, Randall & Co. are not recorded are being in partnership in other photographic directories.  William W. & Charles M. Tileston and J. D Randall are all three recorded in other photographic directories and William W. & Charles M. Tileston were previously posted on May 26 as the Tileston Brothers.

Swain & Paul

1856                Address Unknown, Natchez, Mississippi.

1856                Rooms over J. N. Radcliff, Yazoo City, Mississippi.

Swain & Paul were recorded in one advertisement that ran from May 23 to September 26, 1856 in The Weekly American Banner (Yazoo City, Mississippi).  Call, See, And Judge For Yourselves!  Messrs. Swain & Paul of Natchez, informs the public that they have located permanently in Yazoo City, and have opened at those beautiful rooms over J. N. Ratcliff an Ambrotype, Daguerreotype, and Photograph Gallery, where they are prepared to take pictures in all the Photograph Art in a style not to be surpassed by any Artist in the county.  They have a way (peculiar to themselves) of coloring the Ambrotype which makes the most beautiful picture ever produced.

Messrs. S. & P. take pleasure in explaining to those desirous of ascertaining the mode of taking and putting up of these truly elegant and indestructible pictures.  Yazoo City

Swain & Paul are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Stebbins Brothers

1856                Address Unknown, Watertown, Massachusetts.

1856                Address Unknown, Newton Corner, Massachusetts.

N.D.                Address and Location Unknown.

Stebbins Brothers were recorded in one advertisement that ran from February 15 to May 8, 1856

In the Waltham Sentinel (Waltham, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotypes by Stebbins Brothers, Watertown.   Prices from 50 cents upwards, according to the size of plate and style of case.

Particular attention paid to taking children’s likenesses.  Patronage respectfully solicited from Watertown and Newton Corner.

Photographs made from Daguerreotypes.

N.D.  Broadside (Harvey Zucker’s Collection.)

Daguerreotypes!  The Stebbins Brothers, respectfully inform the citizens of this place and vicinity, that they will remain here _____ Weeks Longer, Only.

It is owing to the increase of business, and the great demand for our Pictures, that we are induced to give this notice.  Those who have not yet got a good Likeness will remember this is the Last Chance.

Notice.  This is a good time to get Landscape Views.  Gentlemen wishing their Residence, or any Views from Nature, Daguerreotyped or Photographed, (without reversing,) are informed that they can have them at short notice, and at low prices, by sending orders early.

Pictures Taken In Any Weather.

Likenesses of Sick and Deceased Persons taken at their residences.

Persons having old Daguerreotypes of deceased friends are informed that we can produce nice colored photographs and good Likenesses from them, which will give universal satisfaction.

Stebbins Brothers are recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Watertown, Massachusetts in 1856, but not the information from the undated broadside.

Staffer & Stedman

1856                Over Baird’s Jewelry Store, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, Ohio.

Staffer & Stedman (L. V. Staffer & O. F. Stedman) were recorded in two announcements and three advertisements in The Weekly Portage Sentinel (Ravenna, Ohio).  The first announcement appeared on August 21, 1856.  Pictures.—Those who desire to obtain valuable and correct likenesses of themselves or their friends, should call at the Ambrotype rooms of Staffer & Stedman in Allen’s Block.  See Advertisement.

The first advertisement ran from August 21 to December 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes!  Ambrotypes taken by Staffer & Stedman, at their Rooms over Baird’s Jewelry Store, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, O., for seventy-Five Cents, where every variety of likenesses can be obtained.  Ambrotypes inserted in breast pins and lockets.  Whole size likenesses for $5 and $6—former price $10 and $12.  Particular attention paid to taking the likenesses of children.  Having a large sky and side light, impressions taken in from three to five seconds.  Our likenesses are all positive and not reversed. All work warranted.  Likenesses taken either in clear or cloudy weather. 

The second advertisement ran from September 4 to December 11, 1856.  Something New.—Staffer & Stedman are now taking Ambrotypes on Paper.  The finest articles in the picture line to send by mail, as it cost no extra postage. 

The second announcement appeared on September 25, 1856.  Portage Co. Agricultural Society.  At the Portage County Agricultural Fair, held September 17th and 18th, 1856, premiums were awarded as follows…On Miscellaneous Manufactured Art… 

L. V. Staffer & Co., Best specimen daguerreotype pictures,  dip.   

The third advertisement ran from October 16 to December 4, 1856.  Premium Ambrotypes and Daguerreotypes.  L. V. Staffer  Co., respectfully invite the public to call at their rooms over Baird’s Jewelry, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, and examine their specimens upon which they received the first premium at the last county fair.  We offer the following reasons why we can produce better pictures than can be obtained elsewhere in this county.  We have the largest and most powerful camera in this section of the state.  Our light is so arranged as not only to give a life like expression to the features, but also drapery of the utmost beauty and richness.  (The want of which is a great fault in the work of some operators.)  We use the genuine chemicals, regardless of expense, and having had ten years experience in the art we know that we can produce better results than the mere tyro of a few months practice.  Those wishing good pictures of themselves or friends will find it to their advantage to call at our rooms and be convinced that this is the place to get a perfect likeness.  Prices as low as in any rooms of good repute in Northern Ohio. Children’s likenesses taken in one or two seconds.  We seldom fail to get a good likeness of the most restless.

Daguerreotypes.—As there are some who still prefer this style, we would say that we are at all times prepared to take them.

Caution.—The public are cautioned against Ambrotypes backed up with black paint or varnished, as the backing will crack eventually and the picture become worthless.  All good operators have discarded this process, we have not used it for many months and all persons having pictures put up by us in that way, are invited to call and when they become cracked and have them made good.  Such pictures can be known by their having a glass over the matting, the position of the setter being reversed, and having a dull appearances at arms length,.

Remember the place, over Baird’s Jewelry Store.  Oct., 16, 1856.  L. V. Staffer  Co.

Staffer & Stedman (L. V. Staffer &  O. F. Stedman), the partnership is not recorded in other photographic directories. L. V. Staffer is also not recorded, O. F. Stedman is recorded in other directories as being active in 1859-1860.

Rugg & Fowler

1857                Washington Hall Block, Watertown, New York.

Rugg & Fowler (George S. Rugg & S. J. Fowler) was recorded in two announcements and three advertisements .  The first announcement appeared in the Northern New York Journal  (Watertown, New York) on May 6, 1857.  Daguerrean Gallery.—Messrs. Rugg & Fowler have fitted up a fine Gallery in Washington Hall building, and are taking some excellent life-like likenesses, either Daguerreotype, Ambrotype, Melainotype, Ambrograph, or Photograph.  Indeed we have never seen better specimens of the art than from their Gallery.  Their advertisement will be found in another column of our paper.

The first advertisement ran from May 6 to August 12, 1857 in the Northern New York Journal  (Watertown, New York).  Removal!  New Daguerrean Gallery!  New Firm, New Styles of Pictures, &c. Such As Ambrotypes, or Pictures on Glass, Melainotypes, or Pictures on Iron. Ambrographs, or Pictures on Card Board.  Photographs, &c., &c.

G. S. Rugg, The Well Known Daguerreotypist, has removed his Gallery to Washington Hall Building, and entered into co-partnership with S. J. Fowler, on New York, who has been engaged since the first introduction of the Collodeon Process in teaching and practicing the art of Ambrotyping and Photographing in the principal Galleries in the State.  We, therefore, feel warranted in saying, that we are prepared to produce as good Pictures, as can be made in New York City, or elsewhere.  Our rooms are large, pleasantly located, finely furnished, and easy of access, and we shall spare no pains in endeavoring to please our customers—We have also something entirely New, which is a Patented apparatus for copying Daguerreotypes or Ambrotypes on Canvas to Life Size! And Coloring Them In Oil.  Which are acknowledged the most Perfect Picture Made.

Persons having small Pictures of departed friends, can, by this process have a Perfect Portrait from them.  Please call and examine specimens, whether you want pictures or not.

Daguerreotypes Made in the best Style for those who prefer them.  Rugg & Fowler.        Watertown, March 7, 1857.

The second announcement appeared on May 7, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Daguerrean Artists.  The tendency towards perfection in no art has been more steady and rapid than that of taking likenesses on silver, glass and other prepared substances.  Pictures are now produced in such elegance of style, softness of tone, and exactness of likeness, on silver, glass, paper, paste-board, &c., as would astonish Daguerre himself could be revisit the earth and witness the progress the great art which bears his name has made within a few years past.  Nor is any city or village more fortunate in the possession of skillful artists in this line than Watertown.  The pictures now produced at Rugg & Fowler’s gallery in the Washington Hall block, evince a practical knowledge of the art in all its branches which marks a degree of perfection that may well be called complete.—Their rooms are very tastefully fitted up with new and elegant furniture for the express purpose of making an inviting retreat for all wishing to see their pictures or procure likenesses.

The second advertisement ran from May 7 to August 13, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Removal!  New Daguerrean Gallery.  New Firm, New Styles of Pictures, &c. Such As Ambrotypes, or Pictures on Glass, Melainotypes, or Pictures on Iron. Ambrographs, or Pictures on Card B’d.  Photographs, &c., &c.

G. S. Rugg, The Well Known Daguerreotypist, has removed his Gallery to Washington Hall Building, and entered into co-partnership with S. J. Fowler, on New York, who has been engaged since the first introduction of the Collodeon Process in teaching and practicing the art of Ambrotyping and Photographing in the principal Galleries in the State.  We therefore, feel warranted in saying, that we are prepared to produce as good Pictures, as can be made in New York City, or elsewhere.  Our rooms are large, pleasantly located, finely furnished, and easy of access, and we shall spare no pains in endeavoring to please our customers—We have also something entirely New, which is a Patented apparatus for copying Daguerreotypes or Ambrotypes on Canvas to Life Size! Which are acknowledged the most Perfect Picture Made.

Persons having small Pictures of departed friends, can, by this process have a Perfect Portrait from them.  Please call and examine specimens, whether you want pictures or not.

Daguerreotypes made in the best style for those who prefer them.  Rugg & Fowler.  Watertown, May 1, 1857.

The third advertisement ran from August 20 to September 3, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Dissolution.  The Copartnership heretofore existing under the name and firm of Rugg & Fowler, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  The business will be carried on in all its branches by G. S. Rugg.  The debts against the firm will be paid by him, and all debts due the firm must be paid to him.     G. S. Rugg,     sic. O. S. Fowler.        Watertown, Aug. 10, 1857.

Daguerreotyping will be renewed for the benefit of those who still adhere to them, and at reduced prices.  G. S. Rugg.

George S. Rugg is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in 1854 without an address or location.  J. S. Fowler is listed in 1859 in Watertown, New York without an address.

Root & Hovey

1854                Address Unknown[1], New York, New York.

Root & Hovey (Samuel Root & Daniel or Douglass Hovey) were recorded in two announcements.  The first appeared on  October 7, 1854 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Premium List.  The following premiums were awarded at the Fair of the New-York State Agricultural Society, held in this City October 3-6…

Best Daguerreotypes—Meade & Brother, New York                        Dip.                                                  Best sample Photographs—Root & Hovey, New York City.           Dip.

The second appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 8, 1854.  New York State Fair…Painting, etc.

Best Daguerreotypes—Meade & Brother, New York                        Dip.                                                     Best sample Photographs—Root & Hovey, New York City.           Dip.

Root and Hovey.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry identifies Hovey as Daniel or Douglass and states that he worked in Samuel Root’s gallery in 1849.  Samuel Root is not recorded as working in Philadelphia in the Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 or in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  Samuel Root does not appear in newspaper advertisements in New York City until 1850 in partnership with his brother Marcus A.

[1] Samuel Root’s address is 363 Broadway.