Tag Archives: Photographers

Tileston, Randall & Co.

1859                50 Main Street, Evansville, Indiana.

Tileston, Randall & Co. (William W. Tileston, Charles M. Tileston and J. D. Randall) were recorded in five announcements in The Evansville Daily Journal (Evansville, Indiana).  The first announcement appeared on September 6, 1859.  Sun Beam Gallery.—Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., will open their new Sun Beam Gallery, No. 50, Main street, this evening easly gas light with a soiree.  Their friends and the public generally are invited to call and examine their suit of rooms for practicing the photographic art.

The second announcement appeared on September 8, 1859.  Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., Daguerreotypist, opened their handsome new Gallery, on Main street, on Tuesday evening, and entertained a pleasant and numerous company of ladies and gentlemen, who passed the evening in agreeable conversation, and examining the beautiful specimens of the art with which the rooms are adorned.  The gallery will be open every evening, and it will be found a pleasant place of resort for an hour.  The combined experience and talent of the three gentlemen will enable this company to produce the finest pictures in every department of the daguerreotyping and photographic art.

The third announcement appeared on September 21, 1859.  Persons wishing good Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, or Photographs, will bear in mind that the place to get them is at Tileston, Rondall & Co.s new Sun Beam Gallery, No. 50, Main street.  Their pictures possess beauty and delicacy of detail, combined with a rotundity rarely seen in Photographic expressions.  Remember that their gallery is kept open every evening until nine o’clock.  Call and examine their pictures by gas light.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 24, 1859.  The New Art Gallery.—Evansville, both at home and abroad, is noted for her commercial and manufacturing advantages; and truly in this respect she has not been underrated; but while steamers plough our waters, canal barges traverse our rich valleys, and railroads bear in their daily burdens, and all pour their rich stores into our lap of commerce; and although our forges and foundries and mills and factories ring with the hum of machinery and the song of labor, yet our people have not altogether forgotten to mingle the beautiful with the useful, in building up the fair fame of our city.

The growing taste of our people is evinced by the number and order of arrangement of our public libraries and cabinets; the improvements in architecture; the embellishment of public halls, saloons, business houses, churches, and private dwellings; the adornment of grounds; the advancement in music, and the polite modes and habits of our society.  And among the many other improvements in popular taste, none is more perceptible just now than the pleasure and satisfaction everywhere expressed at the recent fitting up by the Messrs. Tileston, Randall & Co., of their new Gallery of Art on Main Street.

Readers, have you yet visited the new rooms of these accomplished artists?  It is well worth a visit by the lovers of taste and the beautiful.  The main stairway entrance from the street is broad and inviting to the ascent.  It is open at all hours of the day, and till nine o’clock at night, and is then brilliantly lighted up with beautiful gas fixtures.  Arrived upon the second floor, you are ushered into an elegant apartment which combines the purpose of a saloon, sitting-room, and gallery of art.  Here you register your name in a book conveniently arranged for that purpose, rest awhile, if you like, on the comfortable sofas, and then look around at the pictures upon the walls.  From the floor to the ceiling is hung an endless variety of portraits, life-size photographs in oil, colored photographs, ambrotypes, sun pictures, stereoscopic views, groups, scenes, landscapes, and every style and variety of pictures known to the art.

After you have, of course, selected from the center table a case in which to have your own pleasant features mapped out, you pull a tasseled cord which hangs by the second stairway and the tinkling of a little silver bell above brings down one of the smiling young men, who usher you up into the chief operating room.  This chamber is forty feet long, by twenty in width, and is lighted by an immense sky light, in the center, over head.  The cameras and screens are so arranged, as that two sets of operators can work at the same time with equal effect, and the screens can be extended in any way on slides and hinges, so as to admit of a group of almost any size being taken, with a back ground of over twenty feet in width.

Before sitting for your picture, you step into a beautiful little alcove, fitted up in one corner, and modestly (!) drawing together the tasteful curtains, you find yourself before a large mirror, with all the other toilet paraphernalia, and you soon make yourself “good looking” enough to be “taken off” without breaking the camera lens.  The impression, with the “delightful expression” is done in a moment, and while your friends, the tall and affable Dan, and the sprightly and skillful Tileston Bros., are perfecting your ugliness in the dark room, you have time to look at the general arrangement.  At one end of the chamber is a large shop or working room, for doing the mechanical work of the establishment, and adjoining this is the dark room, fitted up with every possible permanent arrangement.

At the other end is a room, with large windows opening out to admit the sunlight, for photographic purposes.  Several smaller apartments adjoin, with “no admittance” marked over the entrance, into which, however, you will be “admitted” if you are good-looking, patronizing, and have an uncontrollable desire to poke your nose into all the mysteries of the art.  Your picture, by this time is ready; you are satisfied with it, pay for it, and descend into the lower gallery, where you take a card from a fanciful ocean shell-case on the center table, and descend to the street, wondering why everybody don’t visit Tileston, Randall & Co., Picture Gallery, and resolving to tell your friends so.  In short you are satisfied, after a visit, as we are, that this Gallery will hereafter not only afford pleasure and profit to our own people, but, that strangers, happening in the city, will visit these rooms, along with the other exhibitions of public taste and pleasure which adorn the flourishing city of Evansville.

The fifth announcement appeared on October 17, 1859, Vol. XII, No. 53, P. 1.

List of Premiums Awarded at the South-Western Indiana District Fair… Class No. 12—Art. 

Tileston, Randall & Co., of Vanderburgh, [County] best collection colored photographs, 1st premium, 5,00 and diploma.

Tileston, Randall & Co., of Vanderburgh, [County] best ambrotype and sun pictures, 1st premium, 5 00 and diploma.

Tileston, Randall & Co. are not recorded are being in partnership in other photographic directories.  William W. & Charles M. Tileston and J. D Randall are all three recorded in other photographic directories and William W. & Charles M. Tileston were previously posted on May 26 as the Tileston Brothers.

Swain & Paul

1856                Address Unknown, Natchez, Mississippi.

1856                Rooms over J. N. Radcliff, Yazoo City, Mississippi.

Swain & Paul were recorded in one advertisement that ran from May 23 to September 26, 1856 in The Weekly American Banner (Yazoo City, Mississippi).  Call, See, And Judge For Yourselves!  Messrs. Swain & Paul of Natchez, informs the public that they have located permanently in Yazoo City, and have opened at those beautiful rooms over J. N. Ratcliff an Ambrotype, Daguerreotype, and Photograph Gallery, where they are prepared to take pictures in all the Photograph Art in a style not to be surpassed by any Artist in the county.  They have a way (peculiar to themselves) of coloring the Ambrotype which makes the most beautiful picture ever produced.

Messrs. S. & P. take pleasure in explaining to those desirous of ascertaining the mode of taking and putting up of these truly elegant and indestructible pictures.  Yazoo City

Swain & Paul are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Stebbins Brothers

1856                Address Unknown, Watertown, Massachusetts.

1856                Address Unknown, Newton Corner, Massachusetts.

N.D.                Address and Location Unknown.

Stebbins Brothers were recorded in one advertisement that ran from February 15 to May 8, 1856

In the Waltham Sentinel (Waltham, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotypes by Stebbins Brothers, Watertown.   Prices from 50 cents upwards, according to the size of plate and style of case.

Particular attention paid to taking children’s likenesses.  Patronage respectfully solicited from Watertown and Newton Corner.

Photographs made from Daguerreotypes.

N.D.  Broadside (Harvey Zucker’s Collection.)

Daguerreotypes!  The Stebbins Brothers, respectfully inform the citizens of this place and vicinity, that they will remain here _____ Weeks Longer, Only.

It is owing to the increase of business, and the great demand for our Pictures, that we are induced to give this notice.  Those who have not yet got a good Likeness will remember this is the Last Chance.

Notice.  This is a good time to get Landscape Views.  Gentlemen wishing their Residence, or any Views from Nature, Daguerreotyped or Photographed, (without reversing,) are informed that they can have them at short notice, and at low prices, by sending orders early.

Pictures Taken In Any Weather.

Likenesses of Sick and Deceased Persons taken at their residences.

Persons having old Daguerreotypes of deceased friends are informed that we can produce nice colored photographs and good Likenesses from them, which will give universal satisfaction.

Stebbins Brothers are recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Watertown, Massachusetts in 1856, but not the information from the undated broadside.

Staffer & Stedman

1856                Over Baird’s Jewelry Store, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, Ohio.

Staffer & Stedman (L. V. Staffer & O. F. Stedman) were recorded in two announcements and three advertisements in The Weekly Portage Sentinel (Ravenna, Ohio).  The first announcement appeared on August 21, 1856.  Pictures.—Those who desire to obtain valuable and correct likenesses of themselves or their friends, should call at the Ambrotype rooms of Staffer & Stedman in Allen’s Block.  See Advertisement.

The first advertisement ran from August 21 to December 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes!  Ambrotypes taken by Staffer & Stedman, at their Rooms over Baird’s Jewelry Store, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, O., for seventy-Five Cents, where every variety of likenesses can be obtained.  Ambrotypes inserted in breast pins and lockets.  Whole size likenesses for $5 and $6—former price $10 and $12.  Particular attention paid to taking the likenesses of children.  Having a large sky and side light, impressions taken in from three to five seconds.  Our likenesses are all positive and not reversed. All work warranted.  Likenesses taken either in clear or cloudy weather. 

The second advertisement ran from September 4 to December 11, 1856.  Something New.—Staffer & Stedman are now taking Ambrotypes on Paper.  The finest articles in the picture line to send by mail, as it cost no extra postage. 

The second announcement appeared on September 25, 1856.  Portage Co. Agricultural Society.  At the Portage County Agricultural Fair, held September 17th and 18th, 1856, premiums were awarded as follows…On Miscellaneous Manufactured Art… 

L. V. Staffer & Co., Best specimen daguerreotype pictures,  dip.   

The third advertisement ran from October 16 to December 4, 1856.  Premium Ambrotypes and Daguerreotypes.  L. V. Staffer  Co., respectfully invite the public to call at their rooms over Baird’s Jewelry, Allen’s Block, Ravenna, and examine their specimens upon which they received the first premium at the last county fair.  We offer the following reasons why we can produce better pictures than can be obtained elsewhere in this county.  We have the largest and most powerful camera in this section of the state.  Our light is so arranged as not only to give a life like expression to the features, but also drapery of the utmost beauty and richness.  (The want of which is a great fault in the work of some operators.)  We use the genuine chemicals, regardless of expense, and having had ten years experience in the art we know that we can produce better results than the mere tyro of a few months practice.  Those wishing good pictures of themselves or friends will find it to their advantage to call at our rooms and be convinced that this is the place to get a perfect likeness.  Prices as low as in any rooms of good repute in Northern Ohio. Children’s likenesses taken in one or two seconds.  We seldom fail to get a good likeness of the most restless.

Daguerreotypes.—As there are some who still prefer this style, we would say that we are at all times prepared to take them.

Caution.—The public are cautioned against Ambrotypes backed up with black paint or varnished, as the backing will crack eventually and the picture become worthless.  All good operators have discarded this process, we have not used it for many months and all persons having pictures put up by us in that way, are invited to call and when they become cracked and have them made good.  Such pictures can be known by their having a glass over the matting, the position of the setter being reversed, and having a dull appearances at arms length,.

Remember the place, over Baird’s Jewelry Store.  Oct., 16, 1856.  L. V. Staffer  Co.

Staffer & Stedman (L. V. Staffer &  O. F. Stedman), the partnership is not recorded in other photographic directories. L. V. Staffer is also not recorded, O. F. Stedman is recorded in other directories as being active in 1859-1860.

Rugg & Fowler

1857                Washington Hall Block, Watertown, New York.

Rugg & Fowler (George S. Rugg & S. J. Fowler) was recorded in two announcements and three advertisements .  The first announcement appeared in the Northern New York Journal  (Watertown, New York) on May 6, 1857.  Daguerrean Gallery.—Messrs. Rugg & Fowler have fitted up a fine Gallery in Washington Hall building, and are taking some excellent life-like likenesses, either Daguerreotype, Ambrotype, Melainotype, Ambrograph, or Photograph.  Indeed we have never seen better specimens of the art than from their Gallery.  Their advertisement will be found in another column of our paper.

The first advertisement ran from May 6 to August 12, 1857 in the Northern New York Journal  (Watertown, New York).  Removal!  New Daguerrean Gallery!  New Firm, New Styles of Pictures, &c. Such As Ambrotypes, or Pictures on Glass, Melainotypes, or Pictures on Iron. Ambrographs, or Pictures on Card Board.  Photographs, &c., &c.

G. S. Rugg, The Well Known Daguerreotypist, has removed his Gallery to Washington Hall Building, and entered into co-partnership with S. J. Fowler, on New York, who has been engaged since the first introduction of the Collodeon Process in teaching and practicing the art of Ambrotyping and Photographing in the principal Galleries in the State.  We, therefore, feel warranted in saying, that we are prepared to produce as good Pictures, as can be made in New York City, or elsewhere.  Our rooms are large, pleasantly located, finely furnished, and easy of access, and we shall spare no pains in endeavoring to please our customers—We have also something entirely New, which is a Patented apparatus for copying Daguerreotypes or Ambrotypes on Canvas to Life Size! And Coloring Them In Oil.  Which are acknowledged the most Perfect Picture Made.

Persons having small Pictures of departed friends, can, by this process have a Perfect Portrait from them.  Please call and examine specimens, whether you want pictures or not.

Daguerreotypes Made in the best Style for those who prefer them.  Rugg & Fowler.        Watertown, March 7, 1857.

The second announcement appeared on May 7, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Daguerrean Artists.  The tendency towards perfection in no art has been more steady and rapid than that of taking likenesses on silver, glass and other prepared substances.  Pictures are now produced in such elegance of style, softness of tone, and exactness of likeness, on silver, glass, paper, paste-board, &c., as would astonish Daguerre himself could be revisit the earth and witness the progress the great art which bears his name has made within a few years past.  Nor is any city or village more fortunate in the possession of skillful artists in this line than Watertown.  The pictures now produced at Rugg & Fowler’s gallery in the Washington Hall block, evince a practical knowledge of the art in all its branches which marks a degree of perfection that may well be called complete.—Their rooms are very tastefully fitted up with new and elegant furniture for the express purpose of making an inviting retreat for all wishing to see their pictures or procure likenesses.

The second advertisement ran from May 7 to August 13, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Removal!  New Daguerrean Gallery.  New Firm, New Styles of Pictures, &c. Such As Ambrotypes, or Pictures on Glass, Melainotypes, or Pictures on Iron. Ambrographs, or Pictures on Card B’d.  Photographs, &c., &c.

G. S. Rugg, The Well Known Daguerreotypist, has removed his Gallery to Washington Hall Building, and entered into co-partnership with S. J. Fowler, on New York, who has been engaged since the first introduction of the Collodeon Process in teaching and practicing the art of Ambrotyping and Photographing in the principal Galleries in the State.  We therefore, feel warranted in saying, that we are prepared to produce as good Pictures, as can be made in New York City, or elsewhere.  Our rooms are large, pleasantly located, finely furnished, and easy of access, and we shall spare no pains in endeavoring to please our customers—We have also something entirely New, which is a Patented apparatus for copying Daguerreotypes or Ambrotypes on Canvas to Life Size! Which are acknowledged the most Perfect Picture Made.

Persons having small Pictures of departed friends, can, by this process have a Perfect Portrait from them.  Please call and examine specimens, whether you want pictures or not.

Daguerreotypes made in the best style for those who prefer them.  Rugg & Fowler.  Watertown, May 1, 1857.

The third advertisement ran from August 20 to September 3, 1857 in The New York Reformer (Watertown, New York).  Dissolution.  The Copartnership heretofore existing under the name and firm of Rugg & Fowler, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  The business will be carried on in all its branches by G. S. Rugg.  The debts against the firm will be paid by him, and all debts due the firm must be paid to him.     G. S. Rugg,     sic. O. S. Fowler.        Watertown, Aug. 10, 1857.

Daguerreotyping will be renewed for the benefit of those who still adhere to them, and at reduced prices.  G. S. Rugg.

George S. Rugg is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in 1854 without an address or location.  J. S. Fowler is listed in 1859 in Watertown, New York without an address.

Root & Hovey

1854                Address Unknown[1], New York, New York.

Root & Hovey (Samuel Root & Daniel or Douglass Hovey) were recorded in two announcements.  The first appeared on  October 7, 1854 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Premium List.  The following premiums were awarded at the Fair of the New-York State Agricultural Society, held in this City October 3-6…

Best Daguerreotypes—Meade & Brother, New York                        Dip.                                                  Best sample Photographs—Root & Hovey, New York City.           Dip.

The second appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 8, 1854.  New York State Fair…Painting, etc.

Best Daguerreotypes—Meade & Brother, New York                        Dip.                                                     Best sample Photographs—Root & Hovey, New York City.           Dip.

Root and Hovey.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry identifies Hovey as Daniel or Douglass and states that he worked in Samuel Root’s gallery in 1849.  Samuel Root is not recorded as working in Philadelphia in the Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 or in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  Samuel Root does not appear in newspaper advertisements in New York City until 1850 in partnership with his brother Marcus A.

[1] Samuel Root’s address is 363 Broadway.

Root & Granniss

1856                352 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.

Root & Granniss (Marcus A. Root & G. N. Granniss) were recorded in one advertisement that ran from July 29 to August 11, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.)  Root & Granniss, M. A. Root.  G. N. Granniss Photographic, Ambrotype, and Daguerrean Gallery.  Is Now Open At No. 352 Pennsylvania avenue, near Seventh street, where Photographs, colored or plain; Ambrotypes tinted and colored, new style; and Daguerreotypes, are taken in the highest perfection of the art.

The Public are respectfully invited to visit our Gallery whether desiring pictures or not.

Root & Granniss are not recorded as partners in other photographic directories.

S. T. Robinson

1857                Room of Mr. John Neal, adjoining R. P. Cunningham & Co.’s. Grocery Store,                                    Eaton, Ohio.                                                                                                                                  1857                Main Street, Opposite Stephens & Co.’s Store, Eaton, Ohio.

S. T. Robinson was recorded in two advertisements in the Preble County Democrat (Eaton, Ohio).  The first advertisement ran from May 21 to July 9, 1857.  Photography In Eaton.  The Subscriber respectfully announces to the citizens of Eaton and Preble County generally, that he has taken and entirely refitted the room of Mr. John Neal, adjoining R. P. Cunningham & Co.’s. Grocery, for taking Pictures.  He is prepared to take Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Sphereotypes, Stereotypes, Photographs or Mezzographs.

Having had several years experience in the Photographic Art, he flatters himself that he is  prepared to give satisfaction to all that may favor him with their patronage.

Prices—The Melainotype will be put up as low as 75 cents.                                                                Single Photographs, (whole size) $4; by the dozen, $10.                                                                          Color Photographs, $10 each.                                                                                                                               Lockets, Pins, Rings, of any size, filled.  S. T. Robinson.  Eaton, May 21.

The second advertisement ran from July 9 to August 20, 1857.  Photography In Eaton.  Persons wishing Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, Stereoscopes, or Photographs, will please call on the subscriber on Main street, opposite.  Pictures taken in all kinds of weather and on the most reasonable terms.

Copies enlarged and put up in the best of style.  Lockets, Pins, Rings, of the smallest size, filled.  S. T. Robinson.

S. T. Robinson is not listed in other photographic directories.  It is possible that this is the same person as J. T. Robinson (posted yesterday 11-6-20).

Robinson & Sample

1858                Osman’s Post Office Building, Ottawa, Illinois.

Robinson & Sample (S. T. Robinson & S. R. Sample) were recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in The Ottawa Free Trader (Ottawa, Illinois).  The announcement ran on April 24, 1858.  Pictures!  Pictures!!—Messrs. Robinson & Sample have just fitted up, in the new post office block (third story) a handsome suit of daguerrean rooms, where they are now ready to make copies of the “human face divine” in a style up to the finest touches of nature.  They appear to be adapts in the whole range of the photographic art.  They take daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, spereotypes, metanotypes, hallotypes, and we don’t know how many other types; at prices ranging from about nothing upwards.  Whether you can afford to have your handsome countenance perpetuated or not, go at least and see their pictures, for they are worth looking at.

The advertisement ran from May 1 to June 5, 1858.  Photography In Ottawa!  Robinson & Sample Would respectfully announce to the citizens of Ottawa and surrounding country that they have just fitted up a suit of rooms in Osman’s Post Office Building, where they are prepared to put up Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, Stereoscopes, Photographs, Hallotypes, &c., in the highest style of the art.  The public are respectfully invited to call and examine for themselves.

Perfect satisfaction given or no charge made.  Lockets, Pins, and Rings of all sizes filled.  S. T. Robinson,  S. R. Sample.

Robinson & Sample are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Robinson & Finch

1859                            Unknown Location, Dayton, Ohio.

Robinson & Finch (T. J. Robinson & O. D. Finch) were recorded in two announcements in the Dayton Daily Empire (Dayton, Ohio).  The first announcement appeared on May 24, 1859.  A life-sized Photograph of Dr. McIlhenry, Superintendent of the S. O. Lunatic Asylum, adorns the window of Messrs. Wilhard & Wheaton, on Third street.  It is from the establishment of Robinson & Finch, and is a picture of which they may well be proud, as a specimen of artistic skill.  Mr. E. Edmonson has added much to his celebrity as an artist, in the putting on of the paint, and the effort of  the whole have been crowned with success, as the picture has been pronounced by “old masters” as one of great merit and truthfulness.

We will mention, by the way, that Edmonson is regularly employed by Messrs. Robinson & Finch to color and finish all work of the kind entrusted to their care, and we have no doubt but that their business will improve “even as the days do grow” from this time.

The second announcement appeared on September 20, 1859.  The Journal of this morning says:…There is also , in More’s show window, a photographic portrait—not painted—the work of Messrs. Robinson & Finch, which, will be recognized by every one who has ever seen our worthy City Solicitor.  It could not well be mistaken for any body else.

These works of art speak well for the ability of our talented artists.  We doubt whether any other city in Ohio, or the West, will furnish their equals.

The partnership is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry records T. J. Robinson as being active in Dayton, Ohio from 1850-1860.  He is in the partnership of Robinson & Seebohm 1856-1858.  Craig states that the partnership was still listed in 1858-1859.  O. D. Finch is not recorded in other directories.