Tag Archives: Cleveland Ohio

Hawks & Brother

1859                Address Unknown, Cleveland, Ohio.

Hawks & Brother were recorded in one advertisement that appeared on April 1, 1859 in the Cleveland Morning Leader (Cleveland, Ohio).  Hawks & Brother have received and have for sale a large number of fine photographs of landscapes, buildings, etc., in various sections of the country, which will make fine ornaments and decorations for the residences of those who purchase.  The views include many in New York, (City and State,) and other States.  Call and look over the collection.

Hawks & Brother are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Theodatus Garlick

1840                Address Unknown, Baltimore, Maryland.

1841                18 Franklin Building, Cleveland, Ohio.

Theodatus Garlick was recorded in one announcement that appeared on October 22, 1840 in The Pilot and Transcript (Baltimore, Maryland).  The Daguerreotype.—Cheaper Plates.—In the number of the Maryland Medical and Surgical Journal, just issued, is a communication from Doctor Theodatus Garlick, of this city, detailing the preparing daguerreotype plates in a simpler and cheaper manner than that now used, in obtaining photognic drawings.  Doctor Garlick takes a plate of sheet brass, or copper, well planished, to make it very dense.  This he polishes highly, by using first, fine pumice stone and oil, which gives a tolerably fine and regular surface; then rotten stone and oil, which improves it considerably.  The plate is next cleansed by washing or wiping, when it must be finished very highly by the buff with the peroxide of iron without oil.  The plate must be as bright as a mirror to produce a fine picture.  It is now ready for silvering.  “Make a weak solution of the nitrate of silver, which must be applied equally over the surface of the brass with a camel’s hair brush.  The silver is instantly precipitated, and adheres to the plate very firmly, in the form of a dark brown powder.  The surface should then be rubbed over gently with a super-tartrate of potash, made moist with water, which restores it to its bright color.  The successive application of the solution of the nitrate of silver, and the super-tartrate should be repeated at least three times.  The solution of the nitrate should not be to strong, as it then corrodes the brass, and the silver will come off in flakes.  The best criterion is to try the solution upon the edge of the plate.  If it turns the plate instantly black, it is too strong.  It should produce a deep brown color, or that rather gradually.  You may take another buff, (which should be used for no other purpose, and must be soft,)  and a little very fine peroxide of iron, and polish the plate, finally as high as possible.  The buff should pass over the plate transversely, instead of circularly, as recommended by M. Daguerre, so that the marks it leaves should run all one way.  It is now [ready] for the iodine.”  We have used the Doctor’s own words, in giving the process of preparing a plate.  He says it is easily accomplished, after a little practice, and takes but little time.—Plates prepared in this way, he says, are capable of producing the finest specimens of daguerreotype drawings.

1841 August 28.  Daily Cleveland Herald.  (Cleveland, Ohio.)  August 28, 1841, Vol. VI, No. 300, P. 3.

Daguerreotype Portraits.—Dr. T. Garlick, would inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of Cleveland, that he will remain for a short time in their city, for the purpose of taking portraits by the new art.

His rooms are in the Franklin Buildings, where he most respectfully invites them to call and examine his work.

By late improvements, he is able to do work in a style not surpassed, if equalled by any one.

Advertisement was recorded on August 28, 1841.

1841 September 9.  Daily Cleveland Herald.  (Cleveland, Ohio.)  September 9, 1841, Vol. VI, No. 400, P. 3.

A Second Self.—We spent a few moments in the room of Mr. Garlic this morning, just long enough to see a gentlemanly bachelor of our acquaintance set his blessed phiz in ‘a picture of silver;’ the operation took two minutes and a half, and Mr. G. handed him a miniature, perfect in all respects, drawn by the Daguerreotype art true to nature.  All bachelors, at least, should visit Mr. G., and those not entirely deprive posterity of a little image of their noble selves.  His room, No. 18 Franklin Building, where numerous specimens of his skill may be seen.

Theodatus Garlick is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Ohio Photographers 1839-1900 as being active in Cleveland, Ohio from 1839-1841. Also recorded in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist’s in America 1584-1860. As a Sculptor and wax portraitist.  Garlick is a work in progress and only a cursory search has been done of the Cleveland newspapers.

D. R. Williams

1844-1845       8 Merchants Exchange, Cleveland, Ohio.

D. R. Williams was recorded in four advertisement, two were recorded in the Cleveland Weekly Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio) and two in the were from the Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio).  The first advertisement from the Cleveland Weekly Plain Dealer ran from December 4, 1844 to March 5, 1845.  Coming Right Side Up With Care, Colored Photographic Miniatures.  Mr. Williams, late from the east, with all the recent improvements from Paris and New York, has opened Rooms in the Merchants’ Exchange, where he will remain for a short time to give the citizens of Cleveland and vicinity a rare chance of obtaining an Exact Likeness of themselves, or friends.  Painted Portraits copied with the most minute accuracy, thereby enabling each member of a family to be in possession of the likeness of a deceased or distant friend.  Portraits taken by this Late improved process are possed of [a] degree of clearness, accuracy and beauty, seldom if ever seen among the works of art.

Instructions carefully given, and the best quality of apparatus and materials furnished to order.  No. 8 Merchants Exchange.  Cleveland, Ohio.

The second advertisement ran from March 5 to April 2, 1845.  Williams’ Daguerreotype Portraits Colored.  Delays are Dangerous.  Improve Your Time.  Mr. Williams will remain in Cleveland until the opening of navigation; and will be happy to wait on any that may favor him with a call in his profession.  He still continues to “daub his pictures” in a style not to be surpassed in the West.  Pictures put up at eastern prices, and warranted not to cut in the eye, or run down at the heel; or, in other words, warranted to retain their colors.  Pictures made by this process are not troubled with the blues, and become a mere shadow in a few years, as those of the old process.  The citizens are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens.  Cleveland, March 5th. 1845.

The third advertisement ran from April 7 to May 17, 1845 in the Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio).  Williams’ Daguerreotype Portraits Colored.  Delays are Dangerous.  Improve Your Time.  Mr. Williams will remain in Cleveland until the opening of navigation; and will be happy to wait on any that may favor him with a call in his profession.  He still continues to “daub his pictures” in a style not to be surpassed in the West.  Pictures put up at eastern prices, and warranted not to cut in the eye, or run down at the heel; or, in other words, warranted to retain their colors.  Pictures made by this process are not troubled with the blues, and become a mere shadow in a few years, as those of the old process.  The citizens are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens.  Cleveland, March 5th. 1845.

The fourth advertisement ran from May 19 to June 2, 1845. On Hand Again More Humbuging.  Mr. Williams, Having just returned from the east with some of the more recent improvements in the Daguerrian Art, flatters himself that he will be able to please the most fastidious.

Those that have not heretofore availed themselves of the opportunity of getting an exact likeness, would do will to call soon, as his stay in the city will be governed by the patronage he receives; therefore, delay not—procrastination is the thief of time, don’t forget it.

Instructions carefully given, and the best Cameras and materials furnished to order.  Merchant’s Exchange, No. 2, First Gallery.  D. R. Williams.

D. R. Williams is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Cleveland, Ohio.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does record a D. R. Williams in Buffalo, NY in 1844 and in Detroit, Michigan in 1846.  It is unknown if they are the same person, further research is needed to determine if they are or not.  

U. S. Daguerreotype Company

N. D.               30 & 32 West Fourth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio.

1855                105 Superior Street, Cleveland, Ohio.

N. D.  Ninth Plate advertising card in C. L. Branch’s collection, posted on Facebook.

U. S. Daguerreotype Company, Tyler & Co., Nos. 30 and 32, West Fourth St., Cincinnati.

Thirty operators employed in making 800 Portraits daily, by a new German process connected with machinery, and the triple Camera, which takes three likenesses at one sitting.

Superior Daguerreotypes for 25 cents and upwards.  Tyler & Co.

1855.   Ohio Photographers 1839-1900.  By Diane VanSkiver Gagel. 

United States Daguerreotype Co.  103 Superior Street, Cleveland, Ohio.

Tyler & Company are recorded in many photographic directories.  It is unknown at this time if Tyler & Company were involved with the 1855 gallery in Cleveland. 

Mr. Schwert

N. D.               Address Unknown, Cleveland, Ohio.

1859                Address Unknown, Ashland, Ohio.

Mr. Schwert was recorded in one announcement on October 19, 1859 in The Ashland Union.  (Ashland, Ohio).  Photographs.—Mr. Ensminger had on exhibition at the county Fair as fine a collection of colored Photographs as can be found in any gallery in any city East or West.  The coloring of these Photographs was executed by Mr. Schwert, late of Cleveland.  Mr. S. will remain in Ashland two or three weeks, and all who desire to obtain for themselves or friends life-like Pictures, should avail themselves of the rare opportunity now offered.  A visit to Mr. Ensminger’s gallery will compensate all who appreciate good pictures.

A second announcement appeared on October 26, 1859 in The Ashland Union (Ashland, Ashland Ohio). Mr. Schwert’s name does not appear but should have also been credited.  Premiums Awarded at the Eighth Annual Fair of the Ashland County Agricultural Society…

Best painted photographs, E. Ensminger, diploma and 5, 00.

Mr. Schwert is not recorded in other photographic directories.  He is also not recorded in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of American Artists 1564 to 1860.

John H. Ryder

1859                            Merchants’ Bank Building, Cleveland, Ohio.

John H. Ryder was recorded in one advertisement and one announcement in The Ashland Union (Ashland, Ohio). The advertisement ran from March 2 to November 2, 1859.  Ryder’s Premium Photographic Gallery of Art.  Merchants’ Bank Building, Cleveland, O.  The best Oil-painting Photographs in Ohio, are executed at this establishment.

Persons having old Daguerreotypes of lost or absent friends, which they wish to put in more permanent and effective shape, can have them copied in Photograph, to the size of life and painted in oil equal to portraits from life.

Allen Smith, Jr., paints for no other Photographist in this city.                                                          All the various styles of small pictures taken in a superior manner.

The announcement appeared on May 18, 1859.  Ryder, of Cleveland, the celebrated Photographist, advertises in our paper this week.  A great fellow is that Ryder to make himself know.  When we lived in the State of New York, his name became perfectly familiar to us, though he was located in a city much further off than Cleveland is from Norwalk.  And it was all on account of his thorough knowledge of the picture business and enterprise in advertising.  Those who desire a life-like representation of themselves, done up by a master in the Photographic art, should be sure to pay Rider’s Gallery a visit the first time they go to Cleveland.  We’ll warrant them satisfaction.—Norwalk Experiment.

We had that satisfaction ourselves a few days since.  Mr. Ryder exhibited to us some as fine specimens of the art as we have ever seen in any city in the Union.  Those who visit Cleveland and neglect to call at Ryder’s Rooms, lose a sight of one of the most attractive places in the city.

John H. Ryder is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Cleveland in 1857-1858.  Ohio Photographers 1839 -1900 list him as being active in Cleveland 1857-1858; and from 1860-1898.

Mrs. Cain or Cane

1859                200 Superior, South Side, Cleveland, Ohio.

Two entries today, Mrs. Cain and Mrs. Cane, they are probably the same person.  Mrs.  Cain is recorded in an advertisement that ran on May 23 to 31, 1859 in the Cleveland Morning Leader (Cleveland, Ohio.)  Ambrotypes And Photographs.—Mrs. Cain has her picture gallery at her old stand, No. 200 Superior street (South Side).  First class pictures taken on reasonable terms, and warranted to suit.                          my18.

Mrs. Cane

1858                106 Superior Street, South Side, Cleveland, Ohio.

Mrs. Cane was recorded in an advertisement that ran from July 24 to October, 20, 1858 in the  Cleveland Morning Leader (Cleveland, Ohio.)  Mrs. Cane, Ambrotype and Melaneotype Artist, No. 106 Superior St., South Side.) Cleveland, Ohio.

Mrs. Cain or Cane does not appear in John Craig’s Daguerreian Registry or in Diane VanSkiver Gagel’s Ohio Photographers 1839-1900.  In addition information from the Cleveland City Directories for the late 1850’s cannot verify the correct spelling of her last name or provide a first name.  The Cleveland Morning Leader that I have access to starts on June 1, 1858 (Vol. 12, Issue No. 131) and for the most part is a complete run through December 31, 1859.