Tag Archives: Philadelphia Pennsylvania

H.  H. Laughlin

1856                Twelfth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

H.  H. Laughlin is recorded on April 1,1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York). In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America. Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Laughlin, Market St. — I cannot say much for these specimens. The glasses are dirty, and the pictures too light and undeveloped,

 H. H. Laughlin is recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Philadelphia from 1848 to 1858, but is included because of the first hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Isaac S. Lachman

1856                546 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Isaac S. Lachman was recorded on  April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal.  (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Lachman. — A mediocre artist. The gallery has no arrangement or order. The pictures are therefore not of the best.

Isaac S. Lachman is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.  Based on order of names in article it was determined to use the North Second Street address.

 

Samuel L. Kline

1856                272 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Samuel L. Kline was recorded on  April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Kline. — This artist advertises “enamel pictures at 25 cents and upwards.” The pictures lack clearness and tone, but I will admit they are worth the money.

Samuel Kline is listed in other photographic directories, but is included because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

John A Keenan

1856                248 South Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

 John A Keenan 185 appeared on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal.  (New York, New York.)  April 1, 1856, Vol. IX, No. 4, P. 124.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.           

Keenan, South 2nd St. — A very excellent ambrotyper. The tone and color of his pictures are very fine as a general thing. Some pretty fine paper photographs, which speak the artist.

There is need of much improvement, however, in this establishment.

John A Keenan is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Robert N. Keely

1856                332 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Robert N. Keely appeared on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Keely. — Pretty fair daguerreotypes, clear and sharp. Seems to be a working gallery.

Robert N. Keely is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Thomas Joslin

1856                Second and Christian, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Thomas Joslin was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Joslin. — Pretty fair specimens of daguerreotyping.

Thomas Joslin is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Johnson

1856                82 South Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Johnson of the partnership of Waterman & Johnson (Phineas Waterman) was listed in the  Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Waterman & Johnson. — Very excellent ambrotypes, everything got up in the best order. Noticed no photographs on paper.

Johnson is recorded in other photographic directories but is recorded here because of the first hand account of their work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Charles M. Ising

1856                Eighth and Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Charles M. Ising was recorded in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856. In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Ising, Arch St.—Some pretty fair photographs and daguerreotypes. The great defect is want of softness in the photographs especially, the daguerreotypes are better in this respect, but are wanting in sharpness.

Charles M. Ising is recorded in other photographic directories, but is recorded here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

 

 

Samuel Hutton

1856                South Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Samuel Hutton is recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Hutton. — This is a neat gallery, and the pictures are clear and clean. Specimens somewhat above the common order.

Samuel Hutton is recorded in other photographic directories, but is recorded here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Thomas Hutchinson

1856                Second and Callowhill, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] 

Thomas Hutchinson is recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Hutchinson.—Very superior daguerreotypes, very clean and sharp; greater softness, however, would be a desideratum. His colored daguerreotypes are excellent.

Hutchinson is recorded in other photographic directories, but is recorded here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.