Tag Archives: Philadelphia Pennsylvania

Waterman & Johnson

1856                82 South Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Waterman & Johnson appeared in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856 In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Waterman & Johnson. — Very excellent ambrotypes, everything got up in the best order. Noticed no photographs on paper.

Waterman & Johnson are recorded in other photographic directories but are recorded here because of the first hand account of their work.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

Van Loan & Chase

1846-1847       Pennsylvania Avenue, next door to the U. S. Hotel, Washington, D. C.

Van Loan & Chase were recorded in two Advertisements and four announcements, one advertisement and two announcements in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) and one advertisement and two announcements in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  The first advertisement ran from December 19, 1846 to February 8, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance free.  Next door to the United States Hotel.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m., till 5 o’clock, p. m.               

The first announcement appeared in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) on December 31, 1846.  We would call the attention of citizens and strangers to the daguerreotype establishment of Messrs. Van Loan & Chase, next door to the United States Hotel.

The second advertisement ran from April 30 to June 1, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance Fee—next door to the U. S. Hotel.

Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m. till 5 o’clock p. m.. Washington, 1847.  april 14.

The second announcement appeared on May 26, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  A Chinese Painting.  To the Editor of the Union.  Sir:  I request a small space in your valuable paper whilst I employ it in inviting the attention of the regular artists, the amateur, and the curious, to the inspection of an extraordinary and beautifully executed painting—the genuine production of a Chinaman by the name of Sunqua.  The picture, five feet in length and two-and-a-half in breadth, may be seen at the Daguerreotype rooms of Mr. Van Loan, next door to the United States Hotel, Washington City. This picture represents the town of Canton in the Celestial Empire….

The third announcement appeared on June 9, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.) Washington As It Is.  June, 1847, Pennsylvania Avenue.  No. II.

Crossing Third street, westwardly, westwardly, on the North side of Pennsylvania avenue…Next Door westward of the United States Hotel is a spacious and lofty building belonging to John Donoho, at present partly occupied by Van Loan & Chase’s admirable Daguerrean rooms.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 28, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.)  We are indebted to Messrs. Brooke, Shillington, & Co., of this city, for a “View of the Battle of Buena Vista,” published by H. R. Robinson….We are also presented with a fine lithographic portrait of Col. Charles May, from a daguerreotype of Van Loan & Co., of this city.  This is also published by Mr. Robinson of New York….

Van Loan & Chase are not recorded in other photographic directories.  While their first names are not recorded in the announcements or advertisements other photographic directories may shed light into who they may be.  The advertisement reads “Van Loan & Chase, From New York & Philadelphia.”  Based on the order in the advertisement Van Loan would be from New York and Chase from Philadelphia.  To date the only Van Loan working in New York City would be Matthew D. Van Loan while Samuel Van Loan is active in Philadelphia, there is no record of him being active in New York.  Further research on a genealogy site revealed the following.  He was reared in [Catskill, N. Y.] and educated in the common schools. In 1841 he went to New York City and opened a daguerreotype studio, being the first man in the United States to make a business of producing portraits by the new process. He continued taking pictures for ten years in New York, and from there went to Philadelphia and later to Washington, engaging in the same business. Subsequently and up to the time of his death, in 1856, he was employed in the custom-house in San Francisco.   While Chase is a common name, it is possibly he is Theodore L. Chase who was active in Philadelphia in 1846-1847. 

Isaac G. Tyson

1856                86 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Isaac G. Tyson was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856 in an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Tyson, North Second St — Another very mediocre artist. Perhaps his trouble is in the process.

Isaac G. Tyson is record in other photographic directories, but is included here because on the first hand account of his work


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

J. S. Tileston

1846                140 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1846                Union House, Montpelier, Vermont.

J. S. Tileston of the partnership of Harned & Tileston were recorded in three advertisements and one announcement.  The first advertisement ran from September 10 to October 1, 1846 in the Vermont Watchman and State Journal (Montpelier, Vermont).  Daguerreotype.  Messrs. Harned & Tileston, (Recently from Van Loan & Mayall’s celebrated establishment, Philadelphia,) Respectfully announce to the inhabitants of Montpelier and vicinity, that they have taken rooms at the Union House, and are fully prepared to take likenesses in the Daguerrian method, either separately or in groups, in the best manner, and neatly set in Morocco cases, lockets, etc. on the most favorable terms.

Having procured the Improved German Camera, the best and most perfect instrument in use, and having availed themselves of the latest improvements in the art, they have no hesitation in saying they can give perfect satisfaction.  The public are invited to call and examine specimens, and judge for themselves.

Prices of Pictures from $1.50 to $5.00.

N. B.  Through instruction given in the art on reasonable terms, together with a knowledge of the manufacture of all the chemicals used. 

The announcement appeared on October 8, 1846 in the Vermont Watchman and State Journal  (Montpelier, Vermont).  Daguerreotypes.—Messrs. Harned & Tileston, at the Union House, furnish superb daguerreotype likenesses.  We have never seen better ones.

The second advertisement ran from October 15 to 29, 1846 in the Green-Mountain Freeman.  (Montpelier, Vermont).  Daguerreotypes.  Now Is Your Time.  Messrs. Harner & Tileston (Recently from Van Loan & Magill’s (sic.) [Myall] celebrated establishment, Philadelphia,) respectfully announce that they will remain at the Union House during the session of the legislature and will furnish likenesses (either separately or in groups,) in a style, which in point of richness of tone, and beauty of finish stand unrivalled and cannot fail of giving satisfaction.

They would particularly solicit the attention of members of the Legislature and strangers visiting Montpelier, as they are fully prepared to give all an opportunity of securing a perfect Daguerreotype likeness on the most favorable terms.

Just call and examine specimens, and see if we don’t perform all we advertise.  J. L. Harned.  J. S. Tileston. 

The third advertisement ran from October 15 to 29, 1846 in the Vermont Watchman and State Journal (Montpelier, Vermont).  Daguerreotypes.  Now Is Your Time.  Messrs. Harner & Tileston (Recently from Van Loan & Magill’s (sic.) [Myall] celebrated establishment, Philadelphia,) respectfully announce that they will remain at the Union House during the session of the legislature and will furnish likenesses (either separately or in groups,) in a style, which in point of richness of tone, and beauty of finish stand unrivalled and cannot fail of giving satisfaction.

They would particularly solicit the attention of members of the Legislature and strangers visiting Montpelier, as they are fully prepared to give all an opportunity of securing a perfect Daguerreotype likeness on the most favorable terms.

Just call and examine specimens, and see if we don’t perform all we advertise.  J. L. Harned.  J. S. Tileston. 

J. S. Tileston is not listed in other photographic directories.  J. L. Harned is recorded in Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 in the partnership ofHarned & White, in West Chester, in 1849.

Taylor

Taylor—There were three Taylor’s recorded in an article in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856 the article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia.

The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  According to the 1856 Philadelphia City Directory, (business directory)there are three Taylor’s listed under Daguerreotype Miniatures, Benjamin F., North West 2nd & Queen,  William at 205 South 2d, and William at 392 Market.  In the Residence section of the same directory only Benjamin F. and William at 392 Market appears.  Further investigation in Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 by Linda A. Ries & Jay W. RubyBenjamin F. Taylor was active in Philadelphia from 1856 to 1893.  William Curtis Taylor was active from 1854 to 1898, and the second William is not recorded, but they do record an Isaac B. Taylor active from 1855 to 1859.  Based on this information the attribution has been attributed to the three.

Taylor, Benjamin F.

1856                Address Unknown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Taylor. — This is a very good gallery, superior to most others. Principally daguerreotypes.

Benjamin F. Taylor is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work. 

Taylor, William Curtis

1856                392 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Attributed to William Curtis Taylor In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

W. Taylor, Market St. — These daguerreotype specimens are pretty fair. There is, however, a great want of sharpness. In these pictures especially, I noticed that the focus was set on some prominent part of the sitter, to the exclusion of the rest of the body; now, every one will admit, that a mean distance should be taken if we wish to bring each part into exact proportion with the rest, otherwise there will be a dimness about some parts, though one particular point may be perfectly sharp. A mean term should undoubtedly be taken.

William Curtis Taylor is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first had account of his work.  Based on the Market Street address this entry has been attribute to William Curtis Taylor.

Taylor, Isaac B.

1856                Address Unknown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Taylor. — This artist takes pretty fair pictures. For him is not needed the recommendation of order and cleanliness, as the gallery is perfect in this respect. The pictures, however, require greater depth of tone. The gallery is opposite the market, which is not a very good location.    

Isaac B. Taylor is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.                                                                                                                                                                                                      

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

John H. Steck

1856                298 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

John H. Steck  was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia. Steck, Market St. — Daguerreotype artist. Nothing (owing to the lack of all care in manipulation) worthy of remark. Remember for these defects, there is no excuse.

John H. Steck is listed in other photographic directories but are included because of the first-hand account of his work.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

George William (M.) Snyder

1856                316 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

George William (M.) Snyder of the firm Lovatt and Snyder was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  Lovatt & Snyder.—Passably fair pictures, from the situation of gallery &c., should suppose it was for the accommodation of the lower twenty.

George William (M.) Snyder is recorded in other photographic directories but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.  There seems to be some confusion as his name John list him as George W. (M.) Snyder, Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 records him as George William Snyder, but as a side note as G. W. M. Snyder between 1856-1860.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

Andrew Smith

1856                377 North Second, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Andrew Smith was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Smith. — A mediocre artist.

Andrew Smith is recorded in other photographic directories but is included here because of the first hand account of his work.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

Simons & Collins

c. 1845               Address Unknown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Simons & Collins (Montgomery Pike Simons & Thomas P. Collins) was mentioned in one advertisement that ran from July 4, 1846 to September 25, 1847 in the Sunbury American and Shamokin Journal (Sunbury, Pennsylvania).  Silver Medal, Awarded By The Franklin Institute, 1845.  City Daguerreotype Establishment.  T. P. Collins, (Late Simons & Collins.)  No. 100 Chestnut st., above Third, South side, Philadelphia.

Miniatures taken equally as well in cloud as in clear weather.  A dark silk dress for a lady, and a black suit for a gentleman, are preferable in sitting for a picture.  No extra charge is made for coloring, and perfect likenesses are guaranteed. 

Simons & Collins are recorded in other photographic directories and publications as casemakers Philadelphia Photographers 1839-1900 reference  Collins & Simons as David C. Collins and M. P. Simons activity dates 1845-1846.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list Simons as a casemaker from 1844-1847, with no mention of the partnership.  Nineteenth-Century PhotographyAn Annotated Bibliography 1839-1879 list the partnership as being active in 1845.

James Shaw, Jr.

1856                127 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

1856-1857       128 Arch Street, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania.[2]

1858-1859       606 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[2]

James Shaw Jr. was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Shaw, Arch St. — Is another excellent artist. His gallery contains many excellent specimens deserving general praise, I cannot however designate any by name, being mostly portraits.

The ambrotypes are not in the first style, not possessing that depth necessary to give effect to pictures on glass. The photographs however are decidedly superior.

James Shaw, Jr. is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first hand account of his work.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.  [2] Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and