Tag Archives: Philadelphia Pennsylvania

Edwin R. Fredericks

1856                 168 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Edwin R. Frederick as part of the partnership of Fredericks, Penabert & Germon was recorded in the April 1, 1856 Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Frdericks, Penabert & Germon, Chestnut St.—The distinguishing feature of this gallery is its oil colored photographs, which are only equaled by some I have seen in Brady’s gallery New York. The positive photographs show much artistic skill, and are notable for great depth of tone, softness of contour, and for even balance of light and shade. The rooms are very prettily furnished, and their appearance very effective.

Edwin R. Fredericks is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, and is included here because of the firsthand account of their work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Franklin Daguerrean Gallery

1856                    Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Franklin Daguerrean Gallery was recorded in the April 1, 1856 Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Franklin Daguerrean Gallery, Market St.—This is actually a miserable gallery. We would fain pass on without comment.

Franklin Daguerrean Gallery is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.  I have included this entry because it gives a contemporary assessment of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Charles Evans

1856                388 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Charles Evans was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Evans, Market St. — A good, substantial little gallery. The pictures are deserving of credit. In photography we can easily distinguish the clean, careful artist, and are always disposed in his case to overlook lesser defects.

Charles Evans is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Thomas L. Ennis

1856                Eighth and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Thomas L. Ennis was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal  (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Ennis, Arch St. — Some very good specimens of daguerreotyping. Noticed no ambrotypes or photographs. The gallery small.

Thomas L. Ennis is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Joseph Elfelt

1856                296 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Joseph Elfelt is recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Elfelt, Market St. — Some very excellent specimens of daguerreotyping, the photographs however are coarse and unpleasant to the eye. A little theoretical knowledge (to be derived from Books) would set this artist right.

Joseph Elfelt is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included because of the first- hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

H. L. Dickerson

1856-1857       378 Market, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

H. L. Dickerson was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York). In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  Dickerson, Market St. — Daguerreotype gallery, fourth-rate artist. This artist may be able to produce good specimens, but I saw nothing to strengthen the opinion.

H. L. Dickerson is recorded in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 And Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Dawson

1856                Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dawson was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Dawson, Chestnut St. — Mediocre artist. I noticed nothing but daguerreotypes, there were a few which were respectable but dimness and want of cleanness of the glasses destroyed their effect.

Dawson is recorded in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Sabin W. Colton

1856                265 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [1]

Sabin W. Colton was recorded in the April 1, 1856 issue of the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Colton. — A pretty good gallery, if better arranged and more care given to manipulation.

Sabin W. Colton was recorded in Philadelphia from 1850 to 1857.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

John R. Clemons

1856                522 North Second Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

John R. Clemons was recorded on April 1, 1856 in an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America, Number Two, Philadelphia.  In the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In the article the author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia, and wrote the following.

Clemons. — Some very good daguerreotypes. The ambrotypes not so superior. There were but few however in the gallery.

John R. Clemons is known to have operated a studio in Philadelphia.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list him from 1853 to 1860.  Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 list him from 1855-1866.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Lybrand Clayton

1856                168 South Second Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Lybrand Clayton was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Clayton. — These specimens show a gradation from indifferent to very good, proving the artist capable of producing fair pictures. This artist has several stereoscopes in front of the door, which I noticed was the case with several establishments. This is undoubtedly          probono publico.

Listed as a daguerreotypist in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, also recorded in Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.