Tag Archives: Philadelphia Pennsylvania

H. L. Dickerson

1856-1857       378 Market, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

H. L. Dickerson was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York). In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  Dickerson, Market St. — Daguerreotype gallery, fourth-rate artist. This artist may be able to produce good specimens, but I saw nothing to strengthen the opinion.

H. L. Dickerson is recorded in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 And Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Dawson

1856                Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dawson was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Dawson, Chestnut St. — Mediocre artist. I noticed nothing but daguerreotypes, there were a few which were respectable but dimness and want of cleanness of the glasses destroyed their effect.

Dawson is recorded in Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Sabin W. Colton

1856                265 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [1]

Sabin W. Colton was recorded in the April 1, 1856 issue of the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Colton. — A pretty good gallery, if better arranged and more care given to manipulation.

Sabin W. Colton was recorded in Philadelphia from 1850 to 1857.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

John R. Clemons

1856                522 North Second Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

John R. Clemons was recorded on April 1, 1856 in an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America, Number Two, Philadelphia.  In the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In the article the author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia, and wrote the following.

Clemons. — Some very good daguerreotypes. The ambrotypes not so superior. There were but few however in the gallery.

John R. Clemons is known to have operated a studio in Philadelphia.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list him from 1853 to 1860.  Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 list him from 1855-1866.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Lybrand Clayton

1856                168 South Second Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Lybrand Clayton was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Clayton. — These specimens show a gradation from indifferent to very good, proving the artist capable of producing fair pictures. This artist has several stereoscopes in front of the door, which I noticed was the case with several establishments. This is undoubtedly          probono publico.

Listed as a daguerreotypist in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, also recorded in Directory Of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

 

Professor J. Edwin Churchill

1856                434 Pennsylvania Avenue, Between 4½ and 6th Streets, Washington, D. C. 1857                Address and Location Unknown

Professor J. Edwin Churchill was recorded in two announcements, the first on September 6, 1856 in the Evening Star (Washington, D. C.).  ….Prof. J. E. Churchill, the distinguished American artist, is in this city.  Some of his exquisite specimens of photographs in oil, among which is a fine likeness of Mrs. Julia Dean Hayne, may be seen at Whitehurst’s gallery.

The second on August 26, 1857 in the same paper.  Prof. J. E. Churchill has just finished a fine photographic portrait in oil, of President Buchanan.

According to The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in America 1564-1860 J. Edwin Churchill is recorded as a portrait painted in Philadelphia in 1860.

Chase

1846-1847       Pennsylvania Avenue, next door to the U. S. Hotel, District of Columbia.

There are two listings for Chase with no first name attached to the advertisements or announcements in Washington, D. C.  The first instances cover 1846 to 1847, in which three announcements and two advertisements appear (which will be referred as Chase.1.)  The second occurrences was in 1851, in which two advertisements and three announcements appear (referred to as Chase.2.)  It is possible that this same person, but at this time it would be only speculation to suggest that.

Chase.1 was recorded in an advertisement in The Daily Union (Washington, D. C.) on December 19 and ran until February 8, 1846.  Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance free.  Next door to the United States Hotel.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m., till 5 o’clock, p. m.

The first announcement appeared on December 31, 1846 in The Daily Union.  We would call the attention of citizens and strangers to the daguerreotype establishment of Messrs. Van Loan & Chase, next door to the United States Hotel.

The second advertisement appeared on April 30 and ran until June 1, 1847 in The National Whig.  (Washington, D. C.)            Van Loan & Chase, From New York And Philadelphia.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  Admittance Fee—next door to the U. S. Hotel.  Pictures taken in any kind of weather, clear, cloudy, or rainy, from 9 o’clock, a. m. till 5 o’clock p. m..

The second announcement appears on June 9, 1847 in The National Whig (Washington, D. C.)  Washington As It Is.  June, 1847, Pennsylvania Avenue.  No. II.

Crossing Third street, westwardly…Next Door westward of the United States Hotel is a spacious and lofty building belonging to John Donoho, at present partly occupied by Van Loan & Chase’s admirable Daguerrean rooms.

The third announcement appeared on September 28, 1847 in The Daily Union (Washington, D.C.)  We are indebted to Messrs. Brooke, Shillington, & Co., of this city, for a “View of the Battle of Buena Vista,” published by H. R. Robinson….We are also presented with a fine lithographic portrait of Col. Charles May, from a daguerreotype of Van Loan & Co., of this city.  This is also published by Mr. Robinson of New York….

Chase does not appear in other photographic directories as being active in Washington, D. C. nor does Van Loan.  In the first advertisement that announces the partnership of Van Loan & Chase it states that they are from New York and Philadelphia.  Looking at the various photographic directories and histories this would suggest that Van Loan is from New York and Chase from Philadelphia this would mean that the partnership is Matthew D. Van Loan & Theodore L Chase.

Chase.2

1851                Rooms at the Odeon, Washington, D. C.

Chase.2 appeared in the Washington, D. C. newspapers in an advertisement that ran from April 8 to 14, 1851 in the American Telegraph.  Daguerreotypes Equal to any in the city are taken at the Odeon at the lowest prices.  Entire Satisfaction given, or no charge.

The first of three announcements appeared on April 15, 1851 in the American Telegraph.  Can’t Be Beat!  The great number of Daguerreotypes taken at Chase’s Gallery at the Odeon, to be sent to England and other parts of Europe, is an evidence of the excellency of the work done at this Gallery.

The second announcement appeared on April 22, 1851 in the American Telegraph.  Everybody Says—and what everybody says must be true—that the Daguerreotypes now produced at the Odeon are unsurpassed by any in the city and then the prices are lower than any other Gallery.

The third announcement appeared on April 27, 1851 also in the American Telegraph.  At The Odeon May be seen an admirable and lifelike Likeness of the President, where, also, you can be accommodated with a beautiful Daguerreotype, at a very low price.

The second advertisement appeared on May 30 and ran until June 6, 1851 again in the American Telegraph.  Can’t Be Beat.—The Daguerreotypes taken at the Odeon, in execution and truthfulness, are inferior to none in the city; while the price is much lower than at most other Galleries.

There is the possibility that Chase.1 and Chase.2 are the same person based on the activity being in Washington, D. C.  The problem is that there is no collaborating information two tie the two together and John Craig does not list him in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry nor is he listed in Laurie Baty’s unpublished Directory of D. C. Photographers.

 

Dr. A. Caspari

1843-1844       Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

Dr. A. Caspari was recorded twice in advertisements that appeared the in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on June 1, and ran until September 5, 1843 and on October 17, 1843 to January 26, 1844.  It is unknown if Dr. Caspari is a daguerreotypist, a supplier or just an agent for the Langenheim Brothers.  Philip Haas, Edward White, and Peter Laurens[1] are daguerreotypist, Dr. Caspari and William West are not recorded in other photographic directories that I have access to.

Philadelphia Daguerreotype Establishment.  Exchange Building, Rooms 26 & 27.  The Subscribers, having procured the agency for the sale of Voigtander’s Daguerreotype Apparatus, constructed according to Professor Petzval’s calculation, have on hand a large assortment of these Apparatus, and artists as well as amateurs of their art, wishing to procure a good apparatus, will find it to their advantage to procure instruments of this construction.  They also have lately imported a large quantity of German and French plates, and all the chemicals used in their art, which they warrant in every respect, as they are made to their order.  Polishing substances, and morocco cases, and all necessary materials, are sold on the most reasonable terms.  The following gentlemen have agreed to act as their agents, viz:—                                                                                                                                      E. White, 175 Broadway, N. Y.                                                                                                                              P. Haas, Esq., Washington, D. C.                                                                                                                      Dr. A. Caspari, Richmond, Va.                                                                                                                              P. Laurens, Esq., Savannah, Ga.                                                                                                                  William West, Esq., Cincinnati, Ohio. Added to advertisement on June 22, 1843.

All communications (post paid) and orders, accompanied with remittance, will be promptly attended to, and should be directed to W. & F. Langenheim, Exchange Building, Phila.

The second advertisement ran on  October 17, 1843.  Peter Laurens has been replaced by Samuel Broadbent for the Southern States.  Philadelphia Daguerreotype Establishment.  Exchange Building, Rooms 26 & 27.  The Subscribers, has received a large supply of Voigtander’s celebrated Daguerreotype Apparatus, large and small sizes, with achromatic lenses made according to Professor Petzval’s calculation.

Also a new supply of the best plates and chemicals, which he warrants good and sells at reduced prices.  The following gentlemen have agreed to act as their agents, viz:—                E. White, 175 Broadway, N. Y. P. Haas, Esq., Washington, D. C. Dr. A. Caspari, Richmond, Va.  S. Broadbent, Esq., for the Southern States.  William West, Esq., Cincinnati, Ohio.

All communications (post paid) and orders, accompanied with remittance, will be promptly attended to, and should be directed to William Langenheim, Exchange Building, Phila.

[1] Active in Savannah, Georgia from 1843 until at least 1863.  Early Georgia Photographers, 1841 – 1861: a Biographical Checklist, Compiled by E. Lee Eltzroth.

 

David F. Bowers

David F. Bowers appeared in an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia, in the Photographic and Fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856.  The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.  Bower. — An artist of the 4th class, though some of the specimens range above this. This only goes, however, to show that good pictures might be taken, if sufficient attention were given to the manipulations. There was also great lack of cleanliness. Fly.—I noticed some pretty good daguerreotypes, and some pretty poor ones, some pretty clean ones, and some pretty dirty ones, evidently evincing a varied taste.

Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers 1839-1900 by Linda A. Ries and Jay W. Ruby were used to assist in identification of the first name and address. Craig list him as D. F (P.) Bowers and he is also noted as Bowen.  Ries & Ruby list him as David F. Bowers they also reference him as being identified as D. F Bowen in 1856-1857.

Below are the activity dates and addresses for David F. Bowers from Ries & Ruby’s Pennsylvania Directory.                                                                                                                                            1855                  246 North Second Street                                                                                                            1856-1857       217 North Second Street                                                                                                  1858-1861       317 North Second Street                                                                                                    1863                   263 North Second Street                                                                                                    1865                   323 North Second Street

Black

Black was recorded in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York.)  on April 1, 1856 in an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia and recorded his impressions.

Black, Eighth & Carpenter. — Evidently a child in the art, whom I mention in order to keep my list correct.

This is possibly James R. Black.  In Craig’s Daguerrean Registry John attributes the entry to James R. but the address in the directories do not match up.  The same is true with Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900. It is possibly that another photographer with the last name of Black was in Philadelphia that has not been recorded but there is no proof of that.  Did the author record the wrong address?  It’s Possible, no Philadelphia newspapers have been researched at this time.