Tag Archives: Southworth & Hawes.

DeWitt C. Grenell

N. D.               5½ Tremont Row, Boston, Massachusetts.                                                                            N. D.               205 Broadway, New York, New York.                                                                                      N. D.               100 Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                                                        N. D.               Eighth and Chestnut, Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.                                            N. D.               205 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.                                                                      1849                Rooms in Safford’s New Block, Watertown, New York.                                              1850                236 Grand Street, New York, New York.                                                          1851                557 & 559 Broadway, New York, New York.

DeWitt C. Grenell was recorded in three advertisements.  The first advertisement ran on October 17 to November 14, 1849 in the Northern New York Journal (Watertown, New York).  Daguerreotype, Plumbotype, and Calotype Pictures, “Secure the Shadow ere the Substance Fades.”  DeWitt C. Grenell, Daguerrean Artist, just arrived from New York and Philadelphia, with the largest assortment of Daguerreotype Stock, Apparatus and Specimens, ever exhibited in Watertown.  Having had many years experience in the largest establishments in the United States, viz: Southworth & Hawes, Boston, M. B. Brady, N. York, T. P. & D. C. Collins, McLees & German sic. McCless & Germon Philadelphia, also Plumbe’s National Daguerrean Gallery, Baltimore.  He has taken and furnished in the best manner three large and commodious rooms in Safford’s New Block, opposite the American Hotel.  Having a thorough knowledge of all the late improvements in the art, and a superior Apparatus, he feels confident his portraits will excel anything before offered.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens , among which are several distinguished personages.  Photographs neatly set in Lockets, Pins and Rings.  Family Groups of any desired size, also Children taken instantly.

Daguerreotype Stock constantly on hand at the lowest New York Prices.  Goods will be forwarded to Operators in the country on the shortest notice.  Also, instructions given to any person desiring to learn the mysteries of the art.  Watertown, Sept. 26th, 1849.

The Second advertisement ran on June 8 & 10, 1851 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country.  The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none.  The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

The third advertisement ran on June 9 & 10, 1851 in the New York Daily Tribune.  (New York, New York.)  June 9, 1851, Vol. XI, No. 3165, P. 4.

D. C. Grenell’s New-York Daguerreian Gallery at the Alhambra, building 557 & 559 Broadway, formerly occupied by J. Niblo, is now open for the reception of the public; no expense has been spared in making it one of the most perfect establishments of the kind in the world, with a thorough knowledge of every improvement the art has attained, and operators of long experience and superior talent employed enables the proprietor to warrant every picture equal to any taken in this country. The Sky light which is arranged upon a new plan, is superior to many and surpassed by none. The public can rely upon perfect satisfaction, both with regard to quality and price.

DeWitt C. Grenell is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in 1850 to 1851 in New York City.

Mr. Armington

Recorded in the Lynn News, published in Lynn, Massachusetts on April 26, 1850. Daguerreotype Gallery, In The Sagamore Building, near the Central Building, Lynn.  J. H. Currier, Daguerrian Artists, having procured of his late partner, Mr. Armington, his large German Instrument, is now prepared to execute Miniatures of all styles, in groups or single, on small or the largest sized plates that are used.

The date on the advertisement is February 1, 1850. No other advertisements or articles relating to the partnership or to Mr. Armington have been located, and no address was associated to the partnership.  One might speculate that since the partnership was mention in the advertisement that the address of the partnership was the same.

We can further speculate that this might be the H. Armington who wrote a letter to Southworth & Hawes on October 13, 1846 from Pawtucket, Massachusetts.

Pawtucket Mass. Oct. 13th 1846 Messrs.  Southworth & Hawes, Gents, We have seen in pictures in Providence said to have been taken with “quickstuff” prepared and sold by you, which we liken the appearance of very much. We wish you to send us a bottle of the same with the directions necessary for using it.  If we could produce the same results with it as those we saw in Providence should like to make use of it altogether, Please write us your lowest price for Scovilles No. 1 Medium Plates. Also cheapest Medium satin cases also Velvet good articles.  Yours Respectfully                 H. Armington & Co. [1]

 Note that Mr. Armington,  J. H. Currier and their partnership do not appear In The Directory of  Massachusetts Photographers, 1839-1900.

[1] Manuscript formerly in Matthew R. Isenburg’s Collection.

J. T. Ames

J. T. Ames is recorded twice in the Daily Republican newspaper, published in Springfield, Massachusetts on October 14, 1845. His name appears in a list of entries of the Hampden County Agricultural Fair under Specimens of fine arts which was held on October 8 & 9th. J. T. Ames possibly (James T.) from Cabotville (Chicopee) exhibited two daguerreotypes; J. Beals, Jr. of West Springfield exhibited 4 daguerreotypes; G. W. James probably (George W. James) from Springfield is listed with two entries first exhibiting twelve specimens of daguerreotypes and the second entry exhibiting four daguerreotypes; and Stock & Cooley who exhibited six paintings and four daguerreotypes.[1]

The second time he is mentioned was on September 29, 1851 also in the Daily Republican in an announcement for the Seventh Annual Cattle Show and Fair of the Hampden Agricultural Society…The following are the Committees on the various departments of the exhibition:…Under Paintings and Daguerreotypes.—T. W. Carter, Chicopee, James T. Ames, Chicopee, Edmund Freeman, Springfield.

In looking in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry he list a Joseph Ames as an artist and painter at 5½ Tremont Row from 1852-1856 the same address as Southworth and Hawes.  From 1857-1858 at 41 Tremont Row and 1859-1860 at 16 Summer Street.  He goes on to say that another source noted him as a daguerreian who gave assistance to Southworth and Pennell in their early stages (1840.)  John cites the business directory and WW as his sources.  W. W. is William Welling’s Photography in America: The Formative Years 1839-1900.  On page 20.  Welling writes Southworth & Pennell, meanwhile, at some point in the spring or summer of 1840, established a daguerreotype business in Cabotville, near Boston.  “We had the sympathy and substantial assistance of Messrs. Ames, Chase and Bemis.”  This information comes from The Philadelphia Photographer Volume 8, No. 94, October 1871 Page. 315-323. An Address To The National Photographic Association of the United States, Delivered at Cleveland, Ohio, June 1870.  By Albert Southworth. The passage is on page 317.

Checking The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in America 1564-1860 there is a listing for Joseph Alexander Ames as working mostly in Boston from 1841-1847; he went to Italy in 1848, returning to Boston, visiting New York city in 1850, was in Baltimore, Maryland in 1870, and thereafter in New York City where he died on October 30, 1872.  There is no mention of an association with Southworth and Hawes, Southworth and Pennell or daguerreotyping.

In conclusion I believe that the attribution to Joseph Ames is based on the 5½ Tremont Row Address in Boston, not the Cabotville (Chicopee) location where Southworth & Pennell resided in 1840. Further research into J. T Ames (James T.) is needed, we know he made daguerreotypes in 1845 and still resided in Chicopee in 1851.  It is possible J. T. is the Ames mentioned in the Southworth Address to the National Photographic Association of the United States, not Joseph Ames.

[1] Three names J. T. Ames; J. Beals, Jr. and G. W. James are new name and not recorded in A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers, 1839-1900.