Tag Archives: Daguerreotypist

J. H. Felch

1845                Rooms 90 Owego Street, over D. W. Hale’s Store, Ithaca, New York.

J. H. Felch was recorded in an advertisement and announcement. The advertisement ran from January 22 to April 2, 1845 in the Ithaca Journal & General Advertiser (Ithaca, New York). Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber respectfully announces to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Ithaca and vicinity that he is prepared to take Photographic Miniatures with entire satisfaction, in clear or cloudy weather and respectfully invites them to call and examine specimens and “see themselves as others see them.”  Price $2.50.

Rooms No. 90, Owego street, over D. W. Hale’s store.  J. H. Felch.

The announcement appeared on February 19, 1845 in the Ithaca Journal & General Advertiser (Ithaca, New York).  We have been shown by Mr. Felch, some excellent Daguerreotype Miniatures taken by him.  He has a number of specimens at his rooms and will satisfy any one who may call of the faithfulness with which the features of any one can be transferred to the plate.  Rooms over D. W. Hale’s store.

J. H. Felch is not recorded in other photographic directories.

C. Faxon

1841                7 Cheapside, New Bedford, Massachusetts.                                                            1841                Masonic Hall, Springfield, Massachusetts.

C. Faxon was recorded in two announcements while in the partnership of O’Brien & Faxon and two advertisements while he was alone in Springfield, Massachusetts. The first announcement appeared on July 9, 1841 in the New Bedford Mercury (New Bedford, Massachusetts). Daguerreotypes,—Such of our readers as may be desirous to learn more of the curious [all] invented by M. Daguerre in Paris, of copying nature simply by reflecting the image of the object to be represented in a strong light upon a metallic surface prepared to receive it, will do well to call at the room of Messrs. O’Brien and Faxon, Cheapside.  It will be seen by a notice in our advertising columns that these gentlemen will remain in this town a few days, and will execute miniatures, with singular fidelity and dispatch by this process.  We have seen several specimens executed by them, which are indeed facsimiles of the originals.

The second announcement appeared on July 9, 1841 in the New Bedford Mercury (New Bedford, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Messrs. O’Brien & Faxon would respectfully inform the citizens of New Bedford and vicinity that they have opened an establishment at No. 7 Cheapside, (next door to Howarth’s exhibition of paintings) for the purpose of making the Daguerreotype Miniatures.  They practice upon the system of Prof. Morse of New York, combined with other valuable improvements in their possession.  Such is the accuracy and truth of these pictures, that no painter or engraver can equal them, they emphatically represent the man.  They also copy paintings, statuary, engravings, &c.  they will take a limited number of pupils on reasonable terms.  Hours of business between 8 A. M. and 6 P. M.  the public are invited to call as early as possible, as their stay in the place is limited.

The first advertisement ran from September 15 to October 6, 1841 in the Springfield Gazette.  (Springfield, Massachusetts).  Catch The Shadow ere its substance fades.  Daguerreotype Miniatures, At Masonic Hall For A Short Time Only. Prices Reduced to $3.  The Subscriber having spent much time and money in perfecting himself in the Photographic Art, and practiced successfully in various places, now offer his services to the citizens of Springfield and its vicinity, for a short time, at the Masonic Hall.  He is in possession of all those important improvements in the art which have been recently made, combined with others of his own invention, and flatters himself that his skill in the business will recommend him to their favor.  Likenesses, taken in a few moments, without the aid of a strong light, which, by the old method, was liable to distort the features.  To those who are unacquainted with this art, it may perhaps be well to say, that it gives a lasting and perfect delineation of the features, drawn by the pencil of light, the hand of Nature, more striking and accurate than can possibly be obtained in any other way.  The Subscriber has reduced his price to the lowest possible limits consistent with safety to himself, and as low as can possibly be obtained elsewhere, while his style of workmanship he is willing to compare with any in the country.  Price of a single portrait Three Dollars.—For a group of two—Five Dollars.  Satisfaction warranted.  Scenery, Buildings, Paintings, Bust, &c. Beautifully copied.  Instruction given upon reasonable terms. The public are respectfully invited to call.            C. Faxon.

The second advertisement ran from September 18 to October 2, 1841 in the Springfield Weekly Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts).  Catch The Shadow ere its substance fades.  Daguerreotype Miniatures, At Masonic Hall For A Short Time Only.  The subscriber respectfully informs the citizens of Springfield and its vicinity, that he has opened room at Masonic Hall, for the purpose of taking Daguerreotype Portraits.  The most accurate and striking likenesses which will never change or fade are delineated in this manner by the pencil of light, in the space of a few moments.  Miniatures taken in any weather, without the aid of a strong light, which was liable by the old method to cause an unnatural distortion of the features.  Price reduced to $3,00 for a single portrait; for a group or two $5,00.  Scenery, Buildings, Paintings, Bust, &c. Beautifully copied.  The public are respectfully invited to call.  C. Faxon.

C. Faxon is recorded in A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900.

R. A. Farr

1841                116 State Street, over Crain & Davis Store, Schenectady, New York.

R. A. Farr was recorded in two advertisement and two announcements. The first advertisement ran from July 13 to August 10, 1844 in The Schenectady Cabinet, or, Freedom’s Sentinel  (Schenectady, New York).  Daguerreotype Portraits.  The Ladies and gentlemen of Schenectady are respectfully informed, that a Daguerreotype Apparatus is now at the Colonnade, 116 State-street, where it will remain for a few days.  The operator is prepared to take, by the beautiful pencil of nature, miniature likenesses in a superior style, in a few seconds of time; which, being the reflected forms of the objects themselves, far surpass in fidelity of resemblance, any thing which can be accomplished by the eye and hand of the artist.

Persons wishing to perpetuate the true resemblance of themselves or friends, have now an opportunity of doing so at a very moderate expense, and are invited to call.  Three or four figures can be taken on a single plate—grouping in one view a small family.  Miniature copies of Portraits will also be taken; thus enabling individuals to have copies of the likeness of a deceased or absent friend at a very low price.  Call at 116 State Street.

The second advertisement ran on July 16 to 30, 1841 in The Reflector and Schenectady Democrat (Schenectady, New York).  Daguerreotype Portraits.  The Ladies and gentlemen of Schenectady are respectfully informed, that a Daguerreotype Apparatus is now at the Colonnade, 116 State st., where it will remain for a few days.  The operator is prepared to take, by the beautiful pencil of nature, miniature likenesses in a superior style, in a few seconds of time; which, being the reflected forms of the objects themselves, far surpass in fidelity of resemblance, any thing which can be accomplished by the eye and hand of the artist.

Persons wishing to perpetuate the true resemblance of themselves or friends, have now an opportunity of doing so at a very moderate expense, and are invited to call.  Three or four figures can be taken on a single plate—grouping in one view a small family.  Miniature copies of Portraits will also be taken; thus enabling individuals to have copies of the likeness of a deceased or absent friend at a very low price.  Call at 116 State street.

The first announcement appeared on July 23, 1841 in The Reflector and Schenectady Democrat (Schenectady, New York).  Daguerreotype.—We direct the attention of our readers to an advertisement, in another column, of this apparatus for taking miniatures.  The likeness taken with it, is as perfect as is given by the truest Mirror, with the exception of color.—In addition, instead of hours, it requires only a few seconds of time, to complete the operation.  Specimens may be seen at the room, above this office.

The second announcement appeared on September 3, 1841 in The Reflector and Schenectady Democrat (Schenectady, New York).  Daguerreotype.—We dropped in a few days since, to see Mr. R. A. Farr, in his Daguerreotype rooms, over Crane & Davis store, 154 State street.  He is located on the second floor, on the south side of the hall.  His rooms are very handsomely fitted up , and are well adapted, as regards light, to the purposes for which they are used.  He showed us quite a number of the miniatures taken by him, and they were certainly equal to anything of the kind we ever saw.  The likenesses taken with this apparatus, are as perfect in every respect, as those given by a mirror, with the exception of color.  We have seen many which were somewhat indistinct, and we were almost led to believe that it was unavoidable; those taken by Mr. Farr, however, which we saw, had not this imperfection.  It is worth one’s while to call and see the likeness lying on his table, as well as the apparatus and process by which they are taken.

R. A. Farr is not recorded in other photographic directories.

William Farnham

1850-1851       Freeman’s New Building, 80 State Street, Schenectady, New York.

William Farnham was recorded in one announcement and two advertisement.  The announcement appeared on June 4, 1850 in The Schenectady Cabinet (Schenectady, New York).  Mr. A. P. Dostie, the accomplished Daguerreotypist, who has filled a highly satisfactory “mission” to this city, during the past five months, has left us for his former residence, Amsterdam, where he will tarry for a time at least.—Wherever he may go, we bespeak for him that patronage which his success as an operator—to say nothing of his very gentlemanly deportment and faculty that he has of making everybody pleased with both himself and his productions—so justly entitles him.  He will be succeeded in this city by Mr. Farnham, who comes highly recommended.  (Rooms in Freeman’s Building, No. 80 State-street.)

The first announcement ran from June 11, 1850 to January 7, 1851 in The Schenectady Cabinet  (Schenectady, New York).  New Daguerreotype Gallery.—Mr. Farnham would respectfully inform the citizens of Schenectady and surrounding country, that he has recently purchased the Daguerreotype Establishment formerly kept by A. P. Dostie, in Davis’ buildings, and has removed his rooms to the new building of E. L. Freeman, No. 80 State-street, where he has fitted up a splendid skylight which will enable him to take pictures of children of any age in the short space of two seconds.

The subscriber feels emboldened to say, from his practical experience and the facilities he has for taking photographic likenesses, that they cannot be excelled in the city or country in point of beauty or durability.  Pictures taken of adult persons in cloudy as well as in fair weather.  Prices moderate, and perfect satisfaction given or no charge made.  Ladies and gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine for themselves.  WM. Farnham.

The second advertisement ran from July 5 to November 29, 1850 in The Schenectady Reflector  (Schenectady, New York).  New Daguerreotype Gallery.—Mr. Farnham would respectfully inform the citizens of Schenectady and surrounding country, that he has recently purchased the Daguerreotype Establishment formerly kept by A. P. Dostie, in Davis’ buildings, and has removed his rooms to the new building of E. L. Freeman, No. 80 State-street, where he has fitted up a splendid skylight which will enable him to take pictures of children of any age in the short space of two seconds.

The subscriber feels emboldened to say, from his practical experience and the facilities he has for taking photographic likenesses, that they cannot be excelled in the city or country in point of beauty or durability.        Pictures taken of adult persons in cloudy as well as in fair weather.  Prices moderate, and perfect satisfaction given or no charge made.  Ladies and gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine for themselves.  WM. Farnham.

William Farnham is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Dr. C. Farnham

1850-1851       Rooms on Seneca Street, 2 doors below the Mansion House, Geneva, New                                     York.

Dr. C. Farnham was recorded in two advertisements.  The first advertisement ran from November 6, 1850 to January 22, 1851 in the Geneva Daily Gazette (Geneva, New York).  Farnham’s Daguerrean Gallery!  Dr. C. Farnham has just opened a Daguerrean Galley on Seneca St., (2 Doors Below The Mansion House,) where features can be had for the low of $1.00.  His pictures, for boldness of outline and accuracy of likeness are unsurpassed.  Likenesses of sick and deceased persons, taken on reasonable terms.            Geneva October 18, 1850.

The seconded advertisement ran from November 6, 1850 to January 22, 1851 in the Geneva Courier (Geneva, New York).  Farnham’s Daguerrean Gallery!  Dr. C. Farnham has opened a daguerrean Galley on Seneca Street, two doors below the Mansion House, where Pictures can be had for the low of one Dollar, for which $1.50 is charges, a little lower down the street.  Likenesses of sick and deceased persons, taken on reasonable terms.     Geneva October 15, 1850.

Dr. C. Farnham is nor recorded in other photographic directories.

Fant & Gove

1851-1852       Rooms at Union Hall, Franklin, Louisiana.

Fant & Gove were recorded in two announcements and one advertisement.  The first announcement appeared on December 6, 1851 in The Planters’ Banner (Franklin, Louisiana).  Messrs. Fant & Gove, Daguerrian Artist, have located themselves in this town for a short time, which offers another chance to our citizens to possess themselves of the advantages afforded by this valuable art.  They exhibit some beautiful specimens of their skill, which the public are invited to examine at their room, in Union Hall.

The first advertisement ran from December 6, 1851 to January 10, 1852 in The Planters’ Banner  (Franklin, Louisiana).  Wm. O. Fant & G. W. Gove, Daguerrian Artist, Respectfully beg leave to inform the citizens of Franklin and its vicinity that they have rented the Ball-Room at Union Hall, where they will remain for a short time, for the purpose of conducting their profession, and they earnestly invite every one to call and examine their specimens.

They will be happy to furnish Miniatures, in cases of large or small size, to those who may desire them; also, singly or in groups, in breastpins or lockets, on reasonable terms.

The second announcement appeared on January 3, 1852 in The Planters’ Banner (Franklin, Louisiana).  We would inform the public that the Daguerrean Artist, Messrs. Fant & Gove, intend to remain but a few days longer in this town.  The weather is now delightful—just the thing for daguerreotyping—and those who wish a good likeness of themselves or friends could not select a more favorable opportunity.  Those who patronize these gentlemen will be well pleased, for their pictures are fully equal to any we have ever seen, and we have seen some first-rate ones, too.  But call and examine their specimens, than you will be better pleased, and they are always happy to receive visitors.  They have got the finest apparatus ever used in Franklin, and besides, they have testimonials of their skill and ability as artist that are possessed by few.  Call ere it be too late, for “procrastination is the thief of time.”

Fant & Gove, and Fant are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Both Craig’s Daguerreian Registry and Biographies of Western Photographs list a William S. Gove in Huntsville, Texas in the partnership of Robbins & Gove in 1853.  It is unknown if they are the same person.

E. J. Evans

1851                Rooms above the Market House, Charles Town, Virginia.

E. J. Evans was recorded in an advertisement that ran on January 21, 1851 in the Spirit of Jefferson (Charles Town, Virginia). Daguerreotype Miniatures Taken By E. J. Evans, In the Rooms above the Market House, formerly occupied by Mr. Yarnall, where he will remain a short time, for the purpose of taking Miniatures by the Improved Daguerrean Process.  The attention of all persons interested in procuring Daguerreotype Likenesses, of themselves or friends, or copies from Portraits, Miniatures, paintings or statuary, are invited to his specimens.

His arrangements are such that he can take Miniatures of children and adults; and persons in delicate health at their residences, and neatly set them in Cases, Lockets, Pins or Frames. Instructions given, and Apparatus, Chemicals, and Materials furnished.  Miniatures are taken in all kinds of weather.

E. J. Evans is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Charles Evans

1856                388 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Charles Evans was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Evans, Market St. — A good, substantial little gallery. The pictures are deserving of credit. In photography we can easily distinguish the clean, careful artist, and are always disposed in his case to overlook lesser defects.

Charles Evans is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Thomas L. Ennis

1856                Eighth and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Thomas L. Ennis was recorded on April 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal  (New York, New York).  In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Ennis, Arch St. — Some very good specimens of daguerreotyping. Noticed no ambrotypes or photographs. The gallery small.

Thomas L. Ennis is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included because of the first-hand account of his work.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.

 

Mr. Emmons

1842                Rooms over the Northern Bank, Holly Springs, Mississippi.

Mr. Emmons was recorded in an announcement on February 16, 1842 in The Guard (Holly Springs, Mississippi).  Photographic Miniature Likenesses.  Those of our Beaus and Belles, who wish to “see themselves as others see them,” would do well to call on Mr. Emmons, who executes photographic miniatures in fine style, so far as we are capable of judging.—He is pleasantly situated over the National Bank on the west side of the public square, where he may be found, at any time during the day, “ready to hold the mirror up to nature.”  You have only to sit quite for a minute or two, and there you are on the silver plate, ugly or lovely as the case may be.  Laughing girls and talking old ladies are difficult to take.  Call and see.

Mr. Emmons is not recorded in other photographic directories.