Category Archives: Daguerreotypes

Albert D. Lacy

1855                Saginaw Street, Flint, Michigan.

Albert D. Lacy was recorded in one announcement in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on October 2, 1855.  Fire at Flint, Michigan.  We have a telegraphic notice of the fire at Flint, Genesee county, Michigan, of Monday last.  The following particulars we take from the papers of that place:—

On  Monday evening, between 8 and 9 o’clock, our flourishing city was visited by the calamity of another of those awful fires whose ravages made a clean sweep from the corner of J. B. Walker & Co., on Saginaw street, to that of Dr. Moon, notwithstanding the almost super-human efforts to stay its progress.  It is impossible to state yet, with accuracy, the precise loss  of the sufferers, but below will be found as near an estimate as we have yet been able to arrive at after careful inquiry.  Fortunately there was time afforded, in the majority of cases, to remove the goods from the stores before the fire reached them.  It originated in the daguerrean rooms of Mr. Lacy, but in what manner is not known, as the rooms were locked at the time….

A. D. Lacy, daguerrean and dentist’s office–$300, No Insurance…

D. S. Frary, daguerrean rooms—$200.  No insurance.  

Albert D. Lacy is recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list him in 1855 without a business address.  David V. Tinder’s online Directory of Early Michigan Photographers also list him in Saginaw, Michigan as an ambrotypist in 1862-1863 and a photographer in 1853-1865.  David also reports that at various times in his career he was a dentist, a jeweler, a watchmaker and saloon keeper.

Conrad Koehler

1858                236 Houston Street, New York, New York.[1]

1859                236 Houston Street, New York, New York.

Conrad Koehler (or Kohler)was recorded in two announcements.  The first appeared on April 19, 1859 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Coroners’ Inquest Yesterday.  Melancholy Case Of Suicide.—Conrad Koehler, a daguerreotypist, doing business at No. 236 Huston street, committed suicide on Sunday afternoon by taking cyanide of potash, under the following circumstances:—On the afternoon in question two ladies called at the deceased’s saloon and requested that he would take their likenesses.  One of the ladies, on being shown her daguerreotype, said it was an imperfect likeness, and refused to take it.  Deceased seemed somewhat annoyed about the matter, and wished they would call again the following day, when he would make an effort to please them.  The ladies then prepared to take their leave, and were arranging their toilet in the reception room when they heard a loud noise in the adjoining apartment.  On looking around they were shocked to see the artist lying upon the floor, apparently in the last agonies of death.  The alarm was promptly raised and every effort made to save the life of deceased, but without effect.  Deceased never spoke after he fell upon the floor.  Coroner Jackman held an inquest upon the body of deceased yesterday, when the evidence of Mrs. Koehler, explanatory of the sudden death of her husband, was adduced, as follows:—

Maria Koehler, residing at No. 236 Houston street, being duly sworn, deposes and says—Deceased was my husband; he was a daguerreotypist by profession; on Sunday I bought three cents worth of cyanide of potash, a drug which the deceased was in a habit of using in the process of taking likenesses; this was about three o’clock in the afternoon; as soon as I gave him the drug he took it and ate some of it.; I asked him “in the name of Heaven” what he did that for; he made no reply, but asked for some water; he immediately went to the water pipe and turning the faucet, put his mouth under it; as soon as I saw this transaction I informed the ladies who were in the reception room having their likenesses taken that they would have to call again, as the apparatus was broken; when I returned to the operating room my husband staggered and fell across the doorway; I asked him to speak to me, but he was unable to do so, and stared wildly at me; he never spoke afterwards; my husband held a very respectable position in Germany; he was a postmaster in the city of Bensheim Hesse Darmstadt; I have three children now living; I can assign no cause for the commission of the rash act.

John Fergnson, M. D., deposed that he made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased; the stomach was intensely congested, and its mucous membrane was softened and corroded, and easily removed with the handle of the scalpel.  The stomach smelled strongly of cyanide of potash; death was caused from the poisonous effects of the drug in question.

The jury in this case rendered a verdict of “death by suicide.”  Deceased was Forty-one years of age, and had been a resident of the United States for the past eighteen months.

The second announcement appeared on April 22, 1859 in The Daily Press (Cincinnati, Ohio).   

Suicide.—On Sunday afternoon two ladies called at the Daguerrean saloon of Conrad Koehler, Houston Street, New York, and had their likeness taken.  One of the ladies objected to her likenesses as not being accurate, and he requested her to call on Monday.  He then went into an adjoining room, and while the ladies were arranging their toilet they heard a fall as of a heavy body, and on looking into the room they saw the unfortunate Koehler lying in the agonies of death.  On the inquest, Koehler’s widow deposed that on Tuesday afternoon she purchased for her husband three cents worth of Cyanide of potash, a drug used by him in his art; as soon as he got it he art some of it, when she exclaimed “What did you do that for?”  Mrs.  Koehler then told the ladies her husband was not well, but before they left the saloon he fell as above described.  She could not assign any cause for the desperate act.  Koehler, who has been about eighteen months in this country, was post-master for a long time in the city of Bensheim, Hesse Darmstadt.

Conrad Koehler is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry under Conrad Kohler as being active in 1858-1859.


[1] Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

William R. Knapp

1843                263 Grand Street, Columbia Hall, New York, New York.

1845-1854       103 Bowery, New York, New York.

1851-1855       559 Broadway, near Prince Street, New York, New York.

1855-1856       477 Broadway, New York. New York.

1857                43 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, New York.

1857                103 Bowery, New York, New York.

1858                469 Broadway, New York, New York.

1860                398 Bowery, New York, New York.

New York City Directories

1838/1839—engineer—88 Lewis.

1839/1840—engineer—88 Lewis..

1840/1841—engineer—88 Lewis—h-70 Lewis.

1841/1842—gunsmith—50½ Houston—h-18  ave. D.

1842/1843—gunsmith—50½ [Houston]—h-55 Houston.

1843/1844—gunsmith—302 Rivington.

1844/1845—gunsmith–302 Rivington.

1845/1846—daguerreotype—103 Bowery—h-302 Rivington.

1846/1847—daguerrian—103 Bowery.

1847/1848—daguerreotype—103 Bowery & 226 Bleeker—h558 Fourth.

1848/1849—daguerreotype—103 Bowery—h-558 Fourth.

1849/1850—daguerreotype—103 Bowery—h-644 Fourth.

1850/1851—daguerreotype—103 Bowery—h-644 Fourth.

1851/1852—daguerreotype—103 Bowery—h-188 E. 19th.

1852/1853—daguerrean—103 Bowery & 559 Broadway—h-188 E. 19th.

1853/1854—daguerreian—103 Bowery & 559 Broadway—h-188 E. 19th.

1854/1855—daguerrean—559 Broadway—h-180 E. 19th.

1855/1856—daguerreian—477 Broadway—h-75 E. 40th.

1856/1857—daguerreotypist—477 Broadway—h-75 E. 40th.

1857/1858—not listed.

1858/1859—daguerreotypes-469 Broadway—h 145 E. 32d.

1859/1860—no occupation listed—h-145 E. 32d.

1860/1861—photographs—398 Bowery—h-142 E. 33d.

1861/1862—not listed.

1862/1863—not listed.

William R. Knapp is recorded in one advertisement that ran from October 21 to November 2, 1843 in the  New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Daguerreotype Miniatures are taken in a superior style by Wm. R. Knapp, at Columbian Hall, No. 263 Grand street, with all the latest improvements, including color.  Persons wanting a correct likeness of themselves or friends are respectfully solicited to call and examine specimens.  Pictures are taken in cloudy, stormy and fair weather.  Prices including case, from $1.50 to $4.  Hours from 8 A. M. until 4 P. M.                                                                                          

William R. Knapp is recorded in other photographic directories.  But is included here in part with new information.  The activity dates are derived from the city directories and newspaper accounts of over 30 typed pages that have not been included in the blog.  

William Kirk

1857    Reporter Building, Dover, Delaware.

William Kirk was recorded in one advertisement that ran from January 2 to March 27, 1857 in the Delaware State Reporter (Dover, Delaware).  Daguerreotypes.  A Card.—To The Public. The undersigned, having purchased the entire stock and fixtures of the Daguerrean establishment of H.P. Weaver, will continue the business at the same rooms in the Reporter building.  His pictures are guaranteed to be equal, if not superior, to those taken by the best artists in the country.  Particular attention is invited to a new assortment of elegant cases, of the latest styles and richest designs, suitable as gifts for any occasion.  Call and examine them.

Pictures being warranted to give satisfaction, he hopes to receive, in his new vocation, a liberal share of patronage from his friends and the public generally.  Terms moderate.  Wm. Kirk, Reporter Building, Dover.  dec26.

William Kirk is not recorded in other photographic directories.

F. P. Kenyon

1853-1854       Rooms in the building west of H. & F. Sheffield’s Store, Westerly, Rhode Island.

1855-1858       55 State Street, New London, Connecticut.

1859-1861       Rooms Corner State & Bank Streets, New London, Connecticut.

F. P. Kenyon was recorded in eight advertisement and one announcement in four different newspapers.  The first advertisement ran from October 27, 1853 to January 12, 1854 in The Literary Echo and Pawcatuck Advertiser (Westerly, Rhode Island).  Sky-Light Daguerreotypes. The subscriber, having re-opened the rooms formerly occupied by J. Tanner, with many additions and improvements, would inform his friends and the public generally, that he is now prepared to take likenesses in the best style, and at the lowest prices at which good pictures can be obtained.  Using the best American Instruments, and the most effectual Chemical Combinations known, in connection with a Large Sky-Light, he will furnish pictures which shall be inferior to none in their accuracy and beauty of finish.

Please call and examine specimens.  Rooms in the building west of H. & F. Sheffield’s Store.

Sitters should, by all means, wear dresses of a dark color.  F. P. Kenyon.

The second advertisement ran from September 6, 1855 to June 19, 1856 in the New London Weekly Chronical (New London, Connecticut).  Photographs on Glass.  These Pictures, so beautiful in tone, bold & clear in effect, are universally admire wherever they are exhibited, and are rapidly taking the place of Daguerreotypes, which too often proves evanescent and changing in their character.

These Pictures are taken upon the best Plate Glass, and indestructible varnish is then put upon them, which is impervious to the weather.

These Pictures may be set in monuments , carried to sea, or otherwise exposed to the action of the elements—and will retain their brilliancy for ages, being as endurable as the Glass upon which they are taken.  The public are invited to call and examine specimens.  Remember the No. 55 State St., New London, Connecticut.  E. P. Kenyon.

The announcement appeared on September 13, 1855 in the New London Weekly Chronical  (New London, Connecticut).  Ambrotypes.—We have seen considerable said in the newspapers recently about this new style of taking likenesses, but had little idea of what it really is, till we went a few days since, inti the Gallery of Mr. Kenyon, 55 State Street, whose advertisement will be seen in another column.  The specimens of his art which he showed us were certainly very beautiful—much superior to Daguerreotypes—and there can be not doubt we think of the decided superiority of the entire process and execution over the old mode.  We commend Mr. K’s room to the attention of our readers as the place where they will be gratified by seeing a great many exquisite pictures, and be as likely as any where else we know of to obtain an excellent likenesses of themselves or their friends.

The third advertisement ran from January 4, 1856 to June 20, 1856  in the New London Daily Chronical (New London, Connecticut).  Ambrotypes  Photographs on Glass.  These Pictures, so beautiful in tone, bold & clear in effect, are universally admire wherever they are exhibited, and are rapidly taking the place of Daguerreotypes, which too often proves evanescent and changing in their character.

These Pictures are taken upon the best Plate Glass, and indestructible varnish is then put upon them, which is impervious to the weather.

These Pictures may be set in monuments , carried to sea, or otherwise exposed to the action of the elements—and will retain their brilliancy for ages, being as endurable as the Glass upon which they are taken.  The public are invited to call and examine specimens.  Remember the No. 55 State St., New London, Connecticut.  E. P. Kenyon.

The fifth advertisement ran from June 19, 1856 to December 31, 1857 in the New London Daily Chronical (New London, Connecticut).  Ambrotypes!  The Public are invited to call at 55 State St. where they can get Ambrotypes With Colors, Also Daguerreotypes in every variety of style.  F. P. Kenyon.

The sixth Advertisement ran from June 19, 1856 to December 31, 1857 in the New London Weekly Chronical (New London, Connecticut).  Ambrotypes!  The Public are invited to call at 55 State St. where they can get Ambrotypes With Colors, Also Daguerreotypes in every variety of style.  F. P. Kenyon.

The seventh advertisement ran from February 3 to May 5, 1859  in the New London Weekly Chronical (New London, Connecticut).  25 Cent Ambrotypes.  Great Reduction In The Price of Ambrotypes. With Union Cases, Medium Size Which I formerly Got $3.00 For, I Now Offer for $1.50.  One-ninth Size at $1.00 With Picture.  Also Other Sizes in Proportion.

Having had for the past year, competition by parties who have sold the Union Case unfitted, to the public, giving them to understand that they could get Pictures set in the at a Reduced price, whereby they could save to themselves from 75 cents to $1.00 per picture, I now offer to my patrons and the public the above reduced prices, which will positively cheaper than they can buy the Cases and get the picture inserted.

I give these prices to the public to inform them that they can get of me pictures Cheaper Than Ever Before Offered In This City.

Also, I tender my thanks to the public for their very liberal patronage, hoping they will sustain me with their favors.

N.B.—Pictures inserted in Rings, Cases, Lockets, Bracelets, Pins, &c.  Also, Pictures made expressly to send by post, on light material, which will not require extra postage. All work will be done with neatness and dispatch.

Rooms On Corner of Bank and State Sts.  F. P. Kenyon.  jan 29.

The eighth advertisement was recorded on September 20 and August 16, 1860 in the New London Daily Star (New London, Connecticut).  Ambrotypes!  The Subscriber begs leave to inform the Public that he has discontinued the low prices that he has been making Pictures for, and resumed his former prices, 50 Cents, Being the lowest price for which good Pictures will be guaranteed.

Rooms On The Corner Of Bank & State Sts., New London, April. 20th.  F. P. Kenyon.

F. P. Kenyon is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in New London, Connecticut in 1856 to 1860. Another advertisement (not recorded in the blog) dates from February 13, 1861 which was recorded on May 13 where Kenyon is at the same address and advertises Ambrotypes, Photographs, &c.

John also records an H. P. Kenyon in Westerly, Rhode Island in 1855 this is possibly the same person.

C. C. Kelsey

1846-1847       Rooms in Mr. Norris’s Building, Corner of Washington and Meridian Streets,                             Indianapolis, Indiana.

C. C. Kelsey was recorded in one advertisement and two announcements in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  The advertisement ran from November 11, 1846 to January 2, 1847.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber has opened Daguerreotype Rooms in Mr. Norris’s Building, Corner of Washington and Meridian streets.  The Ladies and Gentlemen of Indianapolis are invited to call and examine specimens of this beautiful Art in its present high state of perfection.  Persons sitting for Likenesses are not required to take them unless they are perfectly satisfactory in every respect.  Pictures taken equally well in all kinds of weather.  C. C. Kelsey.

The first announcement appeared on November 12, 1846.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber has opened Daguerreotype Rooms in Mr. Norris’s Building, Corner of Washington and Meridian streets.  The Ladies and Gentlemen of Indianapolis are invited to call and examine specimens of this beautiful Art in its present high state of perfection.  Persons sitting for Likenesses are not required to take them unless they are perfectly satisfactory in every respect.  Pictures taken equally well in all kinds of weather.  C. C. Kelsey.

The second announcement appeared on February 11, 1847.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.—Kelsey, at his room in Norris’s Block, can show photographic likenesses equal to any that we have ever had the pleasure of seeing here or elsewhere.  We advise our friends, and enemies too, if we have any (!) to give him a call if they desire true representations of their phizzes.  If they are naturally handsome. He charges nothing extra; and if they are ugly, he will not grumble if the originals charge the defect upon the process.  Mr. Kelsey will remain in this city but a few days longer. 

C. C. Kelsey is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Charles C. Kelsey as being active in Chicago, Illinois as a daguerrean and stock dealer in 1849-1857.

James Keagy

1850                Rooms at the Court House, Charles Town, Virginia.

1851-1852       Rooms at the Va. House, Staunton, Virginia.

1852-1853       Rooms opposite the Spectator Office, Staunton, Virginia.

1855                Gallery next door to the Virginia Bank, Lynchburg, Virginia.[1]

James Keagy was recorded in three announcements and six advertisements in four different newspapers.  The first announcement appeared on April 16, 1850 in the Spirit of Jefferson  (Charles Town, Virginia).  Daguerreotypes.  Mr. Keagy, a daguerrean Artist of considerable merit, is now sojourning in our town, and has his rooms at the Court House.  He has already taken some among the finest likenesses we have ever seen, and is prepared to do any work pertaining to the Daguerrean art.

The first advertisement was recorded on 16, 1850 in the Spirit of Jefferson (Charles Town, Virginia).  Daguerreotype Miniatures Taken In The Best Style By J. Keagy, Daguerrian Artist.  Rooms at the Court-House, where he will remain but a short time, for the purpose of taking Miniatures by the improved Daguerrian process.

The Ladies and Gentlemen of Charlestown and Jefferson and cordially invited to call and examine Specimens which the subscriber feels confident will commend him to the patronage of all who wish good Daguerreotype Portraits.

N. B. These Miniatures are taken in all kinds of weather.  Miniatures set in Lockets, Rings, etc. in the best style.

The second advertisement ran from October 29, 1851 to July 21, 1852 in the Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator) (Staunton, Virginia).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber begs the attention of the ladies and Gentlemen of Staunton and the adjacent country, to his collection of splendid Daguerreotypes.  He takes them in an entirely new style.—Please call soon Ladies and Gentlemen, as my stay will be short.  Rooms at the Va. House.  James Keagy.

The third advertisement ran from July 28 to December 22, 1852 in the Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator) (Staunton, Virginia).  Staunton Sky-Light Daguerrean Gallery.  The subscriber has just opened his new Daguerrean Gallery, opposite the Spectator Office, where he will be happy to see all who are at all interested in the beautiful art of Photography.

Having a fine sky and side lights and every other facility, he is prepared to produce the finest results of which the art is capable.  The very great advantage of sky-light is known to all who have given any attention to the subject.  Entire satisfaction given in all cases, or no charge.

Pictures taken in all kinds of weather.  Dark dressing greatly preferable.  J. Keagy.

The fourth advertisement ran from December 22, 1852 to January 19, 1853 in the Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator) (Staunton, Virginia).  Call at once if you wish Splendid Daguerreotypes of yourself or friends.  J. Keagy has just returned from New York, where he has been for the purpose of improving himself in his profession.  He is now making the finest pictures ever made in the Valley of Virginia.  He has an entirely new style of picture, which is surpassingly beautiful—the Stereoscope, one of the great wonders of the age.  Call at once and see specimens.  The apparatus is entirely new and of very large size.

The fifth advertisement ran on January 19 & 26, 1853 in the Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator) (Staunton, Virginia).  J. Keagy, Daguerreanist, Respectfully requests all persons indebted to him, to call and settle their accounts, as he intends leaving town in about two weeks, not to return.

The second announcement 1853 February 2.  Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator).  (Staunton, Virginia.)  February 2, 1853, Vol. XXX, No. XII, P. 2.

Mr. Jas. Keagy, Daguerreotypist, desires us to say that he will remain in Staunton only one week longer.  Persons having business with him will please call at his rooms immediately.

The third announcement appeared on October 15, 1855 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).… We publish elsewhere the farewell card of Mr. P. E. Gibbs, who leaves this city for Richmond.  We can but express regret at the departure from us of so accomplished an artist and worthy citizen as Mr. G. [  ?  ] congratulate the people of Richmond on his accession to that city.  As a daguerrean artist we regard Mr. Gibbs as without a superior anywhere.  He leaves the assurance that his place will be well filled in the person of his successor, Mr. Keagy.—Lynchburg Virginian, Oct. 12.

The sixth advertisement appeared on August 26, 1856 in the Lynchburg Daily Virginian (Lynchburg, Virginia).  A Card.—Having sold my interest in the Daguerrean Gallery, in this place. To Mr. James Keagy, I would respectfully recommend to the favorable attention of the public as a skillful Artist, and a gentleman on whom they may rely.  Come, then, and secure one of his inimitable Ambrotypes, which can only be procured of him in this city.

In taking my leave, I would return thanks for the liberal patronage and kind attention received from a generous public, during a residence if over eight years.  P. E. Gibbs.  Oct. 12. James Keagy is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Several notes first J. Keagy first appeared in the blog on September 29, 2019.  Since then more information has been found.  Second is the name of the newspaper Staunton Spectator (and Vindicator) the online newspaper records the newspaper under this title, the masthead is recorded as Staunton Spectator.


[1] Address from Peter E. Gibbs 1853 advertisement.

A. Kaufmann

1847                Wetumpka Hotel, Wetumpka, Alabama.

1847                Mr. Lawson’s Tavern, Talladega, Alabama.

A. Kaufmann (or Kaufman) was recorded in one announcement and two advertisements.  The announcement appeared June 8, 1847 in The State Guard (Wetumpka, Alabama). Daguerreotype Portraits.  We would call the attention of those who are desirous of having a good likeness of themselves or friends, to the advertisement of Mr. Kaufman in to-day’s paper.  We have seen several specimens of Mr. Kaufmann’s work, and we think that he can take as perfect likeness, and finishes as well as any Artist we have ever seen.  Those desirous of having such work would do well to visit his rooms at the Wetumpka Hotel.

The first advertisement ran from June 8 to 22, 1847 in The State Guard (Wetumpka, Alabama). 

Daguerreotype Portraits.  “Secure a shadow, before the substance vanishes.”  A Kaufmann respectfully announces to the citizens of Wetumpka and vicinity that he is at the Wetumpka Hotel, where he will remain a few days, and is well prepared to execute Daguerreotype Likenesses by the most improved Daguerrean process, and is in hopes that the neat and perfect execution of his work will justify him in procuring a reasonable portion of patronage.  He having become acquainted with all the recent improvements in the system, hazard nothing in saving that his Pictures, for distinctness and brilliancy, and for their truthfulness in feature, are entirely unsurpassed; and he respectfully asks all persons to satisfy themselves of their superiority by examining his specimens.

Likenesses taken in any weather, and enclosed in fine Morocco Cases, handsomely finished, in a few minutes time, at the low price of $3.

Miniatures of all sizes taken and inserted in Breast Pins, Lockets, etc.

Copies taken of Family Portraits and Paintings of any kind.

Every Likeness made satisfactory to the sitter or no charge made.

The second advertisement was recorded on August 12, 1847 in the Alabama Reporter (Talladega, Alabama).  Daguerreotype Portraits.  “Secure a shadow before the substance vanishes.”  A. Kaufman announces to the Ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity, that he has opened a room for the purpose of taking Daguerreotype Likenesses.

A Kaufman is a pupil of Mr. Daguerre himself, and is constant correspondence with him whereby he is enabled to take his portraits with the very latest improvements.  His room is at Mr. Lawson’s Tavern, where many specimens are exhibited.

Likenesses made satisfactory or no charge.

Price $4.00.  To Clubs of 20 or 25 persons a reduction will be made.

Instructions given at a reasonable price.  Talladega, July 8, 1847.

A. Kaufmann or Kaufman is recorded in Shot In Alabama A History of Photography 1939-1941and a List of Photographers as being active in 1847 in Talladega, Alabama.

William A. Johnson

1845                Address Unknown, New Haven, Connecticut.

1845                Thames & Mary Streets, Newport, Rhode Island.

1845-1846       Union Bank Building, Thames Street, Newport, Rhode Island.

William A. Johnson was recorded in one announcement and five advertisements five in the Herald of the Times (Newport, Rhode Island).  The announcement appeared on May 6, 1845. Daguerreotypes.—A “Daguerrian Gallery” has recently been opened in the building, corner of Thames & Mary-streets by Mr. Wm. A, Judson, an experienced artist, who has been a long time engaged in the business at New Haven, Con.  We have seen a number of specimens taken by Mr. J. and think they are equal, and in some respects superior, to any we have ever seen.  See advertisement.

The first advertisement appeared on May 6, 1845.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.  Corner of Thames & Mary streets.  The subscriber respectfully gives notice to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Newport, and vicinity, that he has opened a Daguerrean Gallery, at the above place, where The Most Superb Photographs, May Be Obtained.

The Miniatures which have been taken at this Gallery, have been universally assigned the position of superiority—each picture clearly presenting the beauties, colors, and expressions of life, and combining all the late improvements of the art.

The Ladies and Gentlemen of Newport are invited to call and examine the specimens, whether they intend sitting for a miniature or not.  The rooms are open from 8 o’clock a. m. till 5 p. m. where likenesses will be taken without regard to weather, at the reduced price of $2.50.

Two or more Likenesses taken on the same plate, & put up either in Pins, Lockets, or Frames.

Persons having portraits, can have them copied to be put in cases, lockets, &c.  Wm. A. Judson.

The second advertisement ran from May 5 to July 17, 1845. Newport Daguerrean Gallery, Thames Street, (Rhode Island Union Bank Building.) Wm. Henry Franklin, From Plumb’s Daguerrean Gallery, N. Y. and Wm. A. Judson, From T. Hart’s Daguerrean Gallery, New Haven. Having purchased the interest of Mr. Henry M. Brownell, beg leave to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, of Newport, that they are prepared to execute Daguerrean Likenesses in a style unsurpassed.–Being thoroughly conversant with all the modern improvements, their Pictures cannot fail to please. No pictures will be allowed to leave their Gallery unless it gives perfect satisfaction.

Likenesses taken for lockets, Broaches, and Finger Rings.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens whether they intend sitting or not.

Instructions given, and apparatus together with chemicals furnished, on reasonable terms.

Likenesses taken without regard to weather.

The third advertisement ran from September 18 to November 20, 1845.  Newport Daguerrean Gallery, Thames-Street.  Rhode Island Union Bank Building.  William A. Judson, Would respectfully invite all who wish accurate and beautiful Miniatures of themselves or friends to call immediately at his Rooms, Union Bank Building, Thames street.  Delay not, or you may spend years of unavailing sorrow when it is to late to repair the loss.  Many who are in rudy health, and fondly dreaming of a long and prosperous future, ere long will be consigned the affectionate brother or sister, then would be a faithful transcript of the loved and lost.

Miniatures taken without regard to weather between the hours of 8o’clock, a.m. and 4 p.m.  Sept. 4.

The fourth advertisement ran from December 18, 1845 to January 1, 1846.  Photographic Miniatures.  The subscriber has just received from New York, a fresh supply of Plates and Cases, (of the best materials,) and is now prepared to execute likenesses in a superior style, for all who will please to favor him with a call.  Miniatures taken every day, between the hours of 9o’clock A. M. to 4 P. M.  Portraits or Paintings of any description, accurately copied, and at short notice.  William A. Judson.  R. I. Union Bank Building.

The fifth advertisement ran from March 31 to July 23, 1846.  Newport Photographic Depot, R.I. Union Bank Building, Thames-street.  The subscriber would respectfully give notice, to the Ladies and gentlemen of this place and vicinity, that he has taken and refitted the rooms formerly occupied by him, in the R. I. Union Bank Building, for the purpose of executing Miniatures by the Daguerreotype Process,  Having but a short time since returning from New York, with all the latest improvements, he feels confident that he can give those that will honor him with a call, a miniature superior in tone, and finish, to any ever before offered to the public, and at prices that cannot fail to please.

None know how to appreciate these Miniatures, until they are called to part with a near relation, or an intimate friend, when perhaps it may be too late, to catch the light ere their shadow fades; therefore those that wish a correct likeness, as well as a fine picture, of themselves, or friends, will do well to give an early call.

Any person having fine Paintings, Portraits or Miniatures, can have them copied with great accuracy.

These Miniatures can be set in Lockets, Pins, Frames, Cases, &c.to suit the purchaser.

Persons sitting for a Miniature at these rooms, is warranted a perfect Likeness or no charge.

Miniatures can be taken as accurate in cloudy weather, as in pleasant, between the hours of 8 A. M. and 4 P. M.   William A. Judson.

William A. Judson is not recorded as being active in Rhode Island in other photographic directories. 

William A. Judson is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as W. A. Judson and being active in New Haven & New Britain, Connecticut from 1851-1855.

J. W. Jones

1856                Over Lyman’s, Corner of Church and College Streets, Burlington, Vermont.

J. W. Jones was recorded in one advertisement and one announcement in the Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont).  The advertisement ran from February 22 to July 4, 1856.  J. W. Jones!  Skylight daguerreotypes.  His Pictures are said by those who have seen them to be the best they have ever seen.  Please call and see them.

Office over Lyman’s, Corner of Church and College Streets.          

The announcement appeared on September 19, 1856.  The State Fair….Floral Hall….Mowrey & Russell of Rutland, and T. M. Parker and Jones of Burlington, occupied considerable space with an array of ambrotypes and daguerreotypes, of uncommon merit…

J. W. Jones is not recorded in other photographic directories.