Tag Archives: Lansingburgh New York

Milo Thompson

1852                Clinton Block, Lansingburgh, New York.

1853                State and Grove Streets, Lansingburgh, New York.

Milo Thompson was recorded in two announcements in the Lansingburgh Democrat  (Lansingburgh, New York). The first appeared on October 28, 1852.  Fire.—About 3 o’clock on Friday morning last, a fire was discovered in the Clinton Block of buildings, which before it was extinguished did a large amount of damage.  It broke out in the Saddlery establishment of Mr. Samuel Crabb, from which it extended south to the law office of Mr. I. Ransom, the Daguerrean establishment of Mr. Thompson…

The second announcement appeared on February 10, 1853.  Milo Thompson, of this village, has fitted up a Daguerrean Saloon, on wheels, and furnished it with all the necessary appendages, sky-light, &c., for the prosecution of that business.  It is a very neat affair, and can be seen at the corner of State and Grove streets.

Milo Thompson is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Ravlen & Irving

1853                Rooms over T. Lavender’s Grocery Store, Lansingburgh, New York.

Ravlen & Irving were listed in two announcements in the Lansingburgh Democrat  (Lansingburgh, New York).  The first appeared on February 3, 1853.  Messrs. Irvin & Bablin, Daguerrian Artists, have opened a Gallery in this village in the room over T. Lavender’s Grocery Store, where they are prepared to receive calls from the ladies and gentlemen of this place.  They have already transferred the countenances of several of our citizens in such a manner that they almost seem to speak.  From what we know of their skill, we are satisfied that they are artists of considerable merit, and they invite an inspection of their work.  Give them a call.

The second appeared on February 10, 1853.  Ravlen & Irving, daguerrean artists, have just received a new invoice of splendid Pearl, Velvet, and Ivory Inlaid cases, for Daguerreotypes.  Since their arrival in this village they have been doing a regular land office building.

One can only speculate that the correct names of the partnership is Ravlen & Irving since the announcements are only a week apart.  Ravlen & Irving are  not listed in other photographic directories.  There is a possibly that Irving is James Irving who was active in Troy, New York, but without further documentation it is only speculation.

G. W. & N. C. Pine

1853                Corner Grove & Congress Streets, Lansingburgh, New York.                                  1854                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

G. W. & N. C. Pine were recorded in two announcements in the Lansingburgh Democrat  (Lansingburgh, New York) and two advertisements in the Washington County People’s Journal  (Union Village, New York).  The first announcement appeared on July 14, 1853.  “True to life!”  “The most natural I ever saw!”  “They are decidedly the best I have yet seen in Lansingburgh!”  Such are some of the expressions that may be heard daily from persons who have paid Pine’s Mammoth Daguerrean Saloon, corner of Grove and Congress streets, a visit.  It seems to be a fixed fact that Pine is at the head of his profession, equal in rank to the best artists of the present day.

The second announcement appeared on July 28, 1853.  Never were there finer Daguerreotypes executed in the world than those daily produced by our friends, the Pines at their Mammoth Saloon, on the corner of Congress and Grove streets.—Rain or shine, they are always in readiness to wait on their friends, and “secure the shadow ere the substance fade,” with true Yankee genius.  The reason they meet with such great and unprecedented success is, they are among the first artists in the country, are affable in their manners, and will allow no one to leave with poor pictures.

The first advertisement ran from September 21 to October 12, 1854.

Wait, For The wagon!                                                                                                                                                Daguerreotypes, neat and fine,                                                                                                                           Daguerreotypes, rain or shine,                                                                                                            Daguerreotypes—by Messrs. Pine,

At their mammoth Daguerreotype Car, which will be in Union-Village about the 27th of September, and remain in the place for a few days only.

Improvements in Daguerreotypes.  Messrs. Pine take Miniatures with the New Crystal Back Ground, which greatly increases their beauty and permanence.

Please call and examine specimens.   G. W. & N. C. Pine.  Sept. 19, 1854.

The second advertisement ran from October 19 to November 30, 1854.  Ho! For The Wagon!  Pine Has Come!  Daguerreotyping in all its varieties, at Pine’s mammoth Car, which will remain in Union-Village for a short time.  Please call and examine specimens.

G. W & N.C. Pine are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Mr. Pardee

1848-1849       Clinton Hotel, Lansingburgh, New York.

Mr. Pardee was listed in five announcements, the first three are from the Lansingburgh Democrat and Rensselaer County Gazette; the next two are from the Lansingburgh Democrat    (Lansingburgh, New York).  The first appeared on July 27, 1848.  Mr. Pardee, has taken rooms at the Clinton Hotel, and opened his Daguerreotype Gallery for the inspection of our citizens.  We have examined pictures of some of our citizens taken at his room, especially one of an infant 5 months old, which for beautiful accuracy, we have never seen surpassed.  He charges only one dollar for a miniature, which is but half the common price.  We hope he will do a good business.  Give him a call.

The second appeared on August 10, 1848.  Mr. Pardee, at the Clinton Hotel, takes splendid Daguerreotype Pictures.  His prices are so low, only $1 for a miniature and case, that a large number of our citizens are availing themselves of this opportunity for “catching the shadow, ere it fades.”  We would assure the public that he is [ ? ] of superior [ ? ].

The third announcement appeared on December 7, 1848.  Pardee’s Daguerreotypes.  Mr. Pardee still continues at the Clinton Hotel practicing the Daguerrian art, and producing likeness, faithful and in its highest perfection.  He takes them cheap, and the opportunity of securing a perfect facsimile of the “human face divine” of those friends you love, should not be neglected.—He may be found at any time in his room, at which place numerous specimens of “faces familiar” may be seen, and their correctness and beauty acknowledged.

The fourth announcement appeared on March 28, 1849.  Pardee still maintains his well earned reputation of being one of the best artists in the Daguerrian line.  He rooms at the Clinton Hotel, where the visitors can examine specimens of his skill.  One dollar is all it cost to “secure the shadow ere it fades.”  He takes pictures in all kinds of weather.

The fifth announcement appeared on June 28, 1849.  Reader, a word for your private ear.  If you have not yet paid Pardee a visit, and had your daguerreotype taken, you had better do so immediately.  In these Cholera times there is no knowing what may happen, and delays are dangerous.  That’s all.

This is probably Phineas Pardee, Jr.  who is listed in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Lansingburgh in 1850-1851.

John S. Lay

1859                3 Hathaway’s Block, opposite the Gazette Office, , New York.

John S. Lay was recorded in one advertisement that ran from June 30 to July 28, 1859 in Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York).  Ambrotypes.  No. 3 Hathaway’s Block, opposite the Gazette office, Lansingburgh.  Prices Reduced large size only 50 Cents including Fine Case.

The Ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity are respectfully notified that Mr. Lay will remain here a few days, for the purpose of making some of his choice Mezzotint Ambrotypes!

Natural Color, double glass, warranted never to fade.  He wishes to call particular attention to the fact his pictures are made on Black plate glass, which obviates entirely, the use of tar and pitch on the back of Ambrotypes, as the reader can see for himself by knocking an Ambrotypes from its case.  He proposes to furnish the people with Double Glass, Warranted Ambrotypes.  Made on Black Extra Plate Glass, and put up at a style at less than New York and Albany prices.  Each picture will be made and finished by Mr. Lay in person, and he will guarantee it to be as durable as the glass tablet upon which the portrait if fixed.

Pictures taken in Lockets, Rings, &c., old Daguerreotypes Copied, and Lettertypes, cor mail.  Personal attention paid to securing Likenesses of invalid or deceased persons at private residences.  Also, Views of Buildings, Cattle, Machinery, &c.

N. B.—Avoid white, pink and blue in your dresses, ladies,, and never mind the fine clothes. Calico equals, if not excels silk in a portrait. Call and see for yourself.  John S. Lay.

John S. Lay is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Myron E. Judd

1851                   Address Unknown, Albany, New York.                                                                          1852-1854       41 South Pearl Street, Albany, New York.                                                                        1853-1856       3 Hathaway Building, Lansingburgh, New York.

Myron E. Judd was recorded in four announcements and one advertisement in Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York).  The first announcement appeared on December 1, 1853.  It is currently reported that a new Daguerrean Saloon is to be opened in a few days in Hathaway’s building.  Judd of Albany is to be the artist.

The second announcement appeared on September 21, 1854.  The Country Fair…In the Daguerrian Gallery of Mr. Judd, we recognized many familiar faces, which gave the Fair quite a “home” aspect.

The advertisement ran from March 29, 1855 to March 6, 1856.  Daguerreotypes.  All persons Wishing To Secure good Daguerreotypes are again reminded that Mr. Judd takes the very best of Pictures in all kinds of weather.  He keeps constantly on hand a good assortment of plain and Fancy Cases, and his prices are strictly in accordance with the times—at the lowest rates.  It is needless to say, only to such as are not acquainted, that Mr. Judd takes the utmost pains to please.  Remember that life ins uncertain.  Secure the shadow ere the substance perish.  Put it not off until tomorrow, or you may regret it when too late.

The little laughing, loving child, in life so sweet                                                                                      Father, Mother, sister and brother, in a loving group do meet;                                                          But suppose that either or any by nature is taken away—                                                                        Quick! Then, be up, go over to Judd’s, and get their shadows to-day.

Yes and how dear is one of those daguerreotypes when any of our friends are suddenly taken away;—perhaps a father—perchance a mother.  How dear is the smile retained in a shadow when you see the originals no more.—Those persons wishing Good Likenesses of their Children should not wait until Saturday the most hurrying day of all the week.  Put by all, school not excepted.  Come when the light is good, to give the artist a good chance, and in return you will have a good picture.  Dress at all times in something dark.  Avoid as much as possible all light colors.  Wear brown, green, red, check or black.

Judd’s Rooms, No. 3 Hathaway’s Block, are as pleasantly located as could be desired.—Independent entrance, only one flight of stairs, easy of access to old people.  Mr. Judd is truly thankful for the liberal patronage bestowed upon him by the citizens of Lansingburgh and vicinity.  With increasing confidence in his ability to please, he would again invite all to his rooms, and solicit a continuance of the patronage so liberally bestowed upon him for the past year.  Myron E. Judd.   Lansingburgh, March 29, 1855.

The third announced appeared on April 19, 1855.  The more we examine the daguerreotypes taken by Mr. Judd, the more we are convinced that he has no superior as an Artist in this section of the State.  We have in our private daguerrean gallery perhaps forty specimens, taken by different artists, some here, some in Troy, New-York, and the far West, and we venture to say that no judge of a good picture would fail of arriving at the conclusion that Judd’s are clearly entitled to the premium.  His rooms are very tastefully fitted up, and he has every accommodation for visitors.  Another advantage in dealing with him is that he never lets a poor picture leave his hands—a person, therefore, who is no judge, stands an equal chance with those who are connoisseurs in the art.  One more fact we must mention—his charges will be found to be very moderate.

The fourth announcement appeared on November 15, 1855.  The Daguerrian Saloon formerly occupied by Mr. Judd, has passed into the possession of Mr. Clark, who is ready at all times to secure “the shadow, ere the substance perish,” for all those who wish it.—We noticed an Ambrotype of one of our active citizens hanging at his door a few days since—and if we can form an opinion from that, we judge that Prof. Judd’s mantle has fallen upon no unworthy successor.

Myron E. Judd is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry from 1851 to 1854 while in Albany, New York.

Irvin & Bablin/Ravlen & Irving

1853                Rooms over T. lavender’s Grocery Store, Lansingburgh, New York.

Irvin & Bablin/Ravlen & Irving were recorded in two announcements in the Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York).  The first announcement appeared on February 3, 1853.  Messrs. Irvin & Bablin, Daguerrian Artists, have opened a Gallery in this village in the room over T. Lavender’s Grocery Store, where they are prepared to receive calls from the ladies and gentlemen of this place.  They have already transferred the countenances of several of our citizens in such a manner that they almost seem to speak.  From what we know of their skill, we are satisfied that they are artists of considerable merit, and they invite an inspection of their work.  Give them a call.

The second announcement appeared on February 10, 1853.  Ravlen & Irving, daguerrean artists, have just received a new invoice of splendid Pearl, Velvet, and Ivory Inlaid cases, for Daguerreotypes.  Since their arrival in this village they have been doing a regular land office building.

Using Craig’s Daguerreian Registry it appears that Irvin/Irving is probably James Irving who was active in Troy, New York which is only 4½ miles away from Lansingburgh.  Bablin/Ravlen is not recorded in other photographic directories.

H. J. Finch

1855-1858       Room in Hathaway’s Building, Lansingburgh, New York.

H. J. Finch was recorded in fourteen announcements and one advertisement in the Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York). The first announcement appeared on November 28, 1855.  Daguerreotypes And Ambrotypes.—We have just examined splendid specimens at the Daguerrian Gallery of Mr. Finch.  A group of pictures set is one Frame pleased us very much.  Mr. Finch guarantees his Photographs to be equal in every respect, either for fineness of tone, depth of light and shade or durability, to those made at any other establishment in the country.

The second announcement appeared on December 20, 1855 in the same newspaper.  Mr. Finch, the Artist, still keeps open doors and a smiling face, to welcome his friends to his Picture Gallery, where people should go, to be taken.

The third announcement appeared on March 20, 1856.  Finch’s Photographs And Daguerreotypes.—There is no better place in which to secure a perfect copy of the human face divine, than at Finch’s Daguerrean Saloon.  He is a thorough operator, and those who are not good judges of a picture can place confidence in him, for he will not allow a poor picture to leave his rooms.  His ambrotypes are beautiful; and he makes even an ugly face look well, after transferring it to glass.  We are pleased to learn that he is receiving a good share of patronage.  Give him a call, and examine specimens for yourself.

The fourth announcement appeared on March 27, 1856.  Finch swings his banner to the breeze to-day, and invites all who are in want of either Ambrotypes or Daguerreotypes to call and examine some of his specimens.  He has discovered a way of making even ugly faces look pleasing and interesting.

The fifth announcement appeared on May 15, 1856.  All those persons who desire to procure the likeness of themselves or friends, would do well to call upon Mr. Finch, who is one of the best Daguerrean Artists in the State.  Mr. Finch’s shop is in Hathaway’s building.

The sixth announcement appeared on September 18, 1856.  The Fair…  Finch’s Daguerreotypes are the best on exhibition.

The seventh announcement appeared on November 27, 1856.  Finch’s Daguerrean Room is one of the attractive spots of “the garden,” and it does not fail to secure the attention of many passers by.—His Ambrotypes, Photographs, and Daguerreotypes, are splendid specimens of the art, and in his line of business he has no superior.

The eighth announcement appeared on February 5, 1857.  If you have not visited Finch’s Ambrotype Gallery, in Hathaway’s Row, you are behind the age.  His pictures are worthy of examination, as combining all the excellences of the art.  We doubt if he could not compete with the most renowned in his profession.

The ninth announcement appeared on February 12, 1857.  The Fine Arts.  All those who have any fancy for the Fine Arts, should not miss of calling at Fitch’s Photographic Gallery, and examine a specimen of his ambrotypes, colored in Oil.  These pictures are taken by the collodian process, on a metallic plate instead of glass, and then painted in Oil Colors.  They are the most life-like, high toned pictures we have seen, yet possessing all the accurateness of a Daguerreotype, giving natural color, even to the color of the eyes, and we see no reason why they should not be as lasting as any other oil painting.  Mr. Finch informs us that he can copy old Daguerreotypes, and enlarge them several times, and have the copy painted, making a perfect picture, equal to that taken from life.  We think that friend Finch will have enough of that sort of work to do, as there are scores of Daguerreotypes of deceased persons, whose friends would like to see pictured out in Nature’s colors.  Those who have Daguerreotypes to copy, should give Mr. Finch a Call, and have the shadow secured by this new process.

The first advertisement ran from June 18 to July 9, 1857.  A Card.  H. J. Finch would tender his thanks to his friends in Lansingburgh and vicinity for their liberal patronage and would also inform them that his Ambrotype Rooms will be closed after the 20th of this month until the 20th of September, when he will again be happy to wait upon his old customers and all may favor him with a call.

The tenth announcement appeared on June 18, 1857.   H. J. Finch, Esq., of this village, has been chosen Secretary of the Grand National Horse Exhibition and fair, to be held in September next, in Albany.  $6000 in premiums will be awarded, and it is to be conducted in the most liberal manner.

The eleventh announcement appeared on June 18, 1857.  Where To Go.—If you want clothing of any kind, Charley Clark’s “Taylor’s Camp,” is the place to get it, and after you are dressed up in a suit purchased of him, go to Finch’s and get one of those inimitable illuminated Ambrotypes that he takes.  If these directions are followed, we’ll guarantee the only fault to be found will be that the miniature will be a “little flattering.”  Enough said.

The twelfth announcement appeared on July 23, 1857.  A Card.  Those who wish a good Ambrotype, would do well to call at Fitch’s Rooms.  Mr. Finch has made arrangements with Mr. Dewel formerly operator for Clark and Holmes to continue the business during his absence.

The thirteenth announcement appeared on January 7, 1858.  H. J. Finch, Artist, has re-opened his Ambrotype Saloon, and is prepared to take pictures for the million.  Try him on once.  He makes excellent pictures.

The fourteenth announcement appeared on February 17, 1858.  Ambrotypes.  Mr. James Irving, of Troy, has leased the Daguerrian rooms in this place, lately occupied by Mr. Finch, and is now fully prepared to make first class pictures in his inimitable style.  Those who desire a really good picture should give Mr. Irving a call.

H. J. Finch is not listed in other photographic directories.

Mr. Dewel

N.D.                 Rooms in the Museum Building, Troy, New York.                                                                1857                Room in Hathaway’s Building, Lansingburgh, New York.

Mr. Dewel was recorded in an announcement on July 23, 1857 in the Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York).  A Card.  Those who wish a good Ambrotype, would do well to call at Fitch’s Rooms.  Mr. Finch has made arrangements with Mr. Dewel formerly operator for Clark and Holmes to continue the business during his absence.

Mr. Dewel is not recorded in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a T. Dewell in Albany in 1850-1851, but it would be pure speculation to suggest they were the same person.

Mr. Clark

1855                3 Hathaway Building, Lansingburgh, New York.

Mr. Clark was recorded in an announcement on November 15, 1855 in the Lansingburgh Democrat (Lansingburgh, New York).  The Daguerrian Saloon formerly occupied by Mr. Judd, has passed into the possession of Mr. Clark, who is ready at all times to secure “the shadow, ere the substance perish,” for all those who wish it.—We noticed an Ambrotype of one of our active citizens hanging at his door a few days since—and if we can form an opinion from that, we judge that Prof. Judd’s mantle has fallen upon no unworthy successor.

After checking the photographic directories the only possible identification for Mr. Clark is Charles R. Clark, who was listed in Troy, New York in 1856 to 1861.  The distance between the two towns is only sixteen to seventeen miles away.  But as always this is only speculation on my part.