Tag Archives: Union Village New York

William H. Rablen

C.1842-1854   Address and Location Unknown, New York.                                                                  1854-1855       4 Franklin Square, Troy, New York.[1]                                                                          1856                   Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.                                                                1857-1858        Rooms in Stewart’s Block, Middlebury, Vermont.

William H. Rablen was recorded in two announcements and seven advertisements.  The first announcement he was mentioned, appeared on  July 1, 1855 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  New and Beautiful Discovery.—The Public are invited to call and see some specimens of daguerreotypes, with an improvement discovered by Mr. W. H. Rablen of Troy, formerly one of our artists, by which the most beautiful effects are projected.  Meade Brothers, 233 Broadway, four doors above the Astor House.

The second announcement he was mentioned, appeared on  September 18, 1856 in the Washington County People’s Journal (Union Village, New York.)  Ambrotypes.—Our readers will perceive by the advertisement of Mr. Morse, that they have now an opportunity of procuring the new and beautiful style of picture called the Ambrotype.  The Ambrotype is generally adjusted superior to the daguerreotype.  Mr. M. and his associate, Mr. Rablen, are skilful operators; they have a good instrument, and keep on hand an excellent assortment of cases.  We have seen several pictures executed by them, which for richness of tone, beauty of finish and accuracy in delineating the human face divine, cannot well be surpassed, either in city or country.  Give them a call.

The first advertisement ran from September 18 to November 27, 1856 in the Washington County People’s Journal (Union Village, New York).  Ambrotypes.  George Morse, would respectfully announce to the citizens of Washington County and vicinity that he is now located for a few weeks at Union-Village for the purpose of making Ambrotypes.

He has engaged the services of Mr. W. H. Rablen, of Troy, who for the past 14 years has been engaged in Daguerreotyping in the principal cities in this State, and therefore has had an excellent opportunity of engaging in all new styles of Pictures as they have made their appearance.  Being among the first who launched into the Glass process and for the last 18 months practicing that branch alone, he confidently asserts that he will produce as good a Picture as can be produced by the Ambrotype process; for proof, bring along one of your best Ambrotypes and let him have a “shot at you.”

An Ambrotype is taken on Plate Glass, then hermetically sealed between two glasses, so that it cannot be effected by either air or water.

Mr. Morse returns his sincere thanks for the patronage that he has already met with.  Geo. Morse.

The following six advertisements appeared in The Middlebury Register (Middlebury, Vermont).  The second advertisement ran from March 11 to 25, 1857.  Improved Ambrotypes.  There is nothing prettier to present to a friend than a “fac simile” of yourself, when you can procure one executed in a scientific manner.  Since the introduction of the Daguerreotyping in America improvements have continually been made by our enterprising countrymen.  One of the latest of these improvements the subscribers now introduce to the citizens of Middlebury.  By it we make the picture of the subject have the appearance of projecting an eight of an inch from the glass, therefore get a full stereoscopic view without the use of lenses.

For Brilliancy of Tone and Durability of finish these pictures cannot be excelled.  One of the subscribers has had long experience in picture making, having for the last 14 years been engaged in the principal establishments both in this country and Europe.  Every improvement that has made its appearance he has had an excellent opportunity to “launch” directory into, and is  therefore fully competent to execute first class work at whichever branch of the picture business he undertakes.  Ambrotypes made after the most improved style, either on light or dark ground. An Ambrotype when properly finished is hermetically sealed between two glasses, so that they cannot be affected by either air or water.  All of our pictures are hermetically sealed, which process any one desirous of seeing will be shown with cheerfulness.  Ambrotypes set in lockets.

Pictures of sick or deceased persons taken at their residences.  Particular attention paid to copying Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes of Paintings.  All copies we guarantee equal to the original pictures.

Rooms in Stewart’s Block.  All are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens.  Putnam & Rablen.

The third advertisement ran from April 8 to 22, 1857.  If You Want A Superior Ambrotype, —You had better call soon,—As We Remain In Town But a few days longer.  Rablen & Putnam.

The fourth advertisement appeared on July 8, 1857.  To The Music World!  Just received, a large lot of New Sheet Music…Call at the Daguerrean Rooms, in Stewart’s Building.  A, J. Hervey…

The fifth advertisement ran from July 22, 1857 to February 3, 1858.  Ambrotypes.  W. H. Rablen respectfully announces to the public that he has purchased his former Partner’s interest in the concern, and having had a good share of patronage awarded him, (for which he is very thankful) he has concluded to remain at Middlebury for some few months longer.  He has recently made great improvements in his rooms, making them much more convenient for customers, and fitted up in a neat and tasty manner.  Having had a number of applications to take views, I have engaged my brother to assist me, and am now prepared to take views of residences, scenery, horses, cattle, or anything that may be desired.  Specimens of scenery may be seen at the rooms.  Those wishing pictures, by patronizing me, may rest assured that they will get as good a picture as can be made, as I take a great interest in producing good work and allow no one to beat me in any branch of my business which I undertake, (unless in writing advertisements)  Please call and examine specimens.  Rooms in Stewart’s Block.

The sixth advertisement ran from February 3 to September 29, 1858.  Rablen Has introduced another new style of picture called the “Scenic Ambrotype.”  Which for beauty of finish and stereoscopic effect, has never before been equaled in Middlebury.  Please call and examine specimens at the Sky-Light Ambrotype Gallery, Stewart’s Block.

The seventh advertisement ran from April 28 to June 9, 1858.  Superior Ambrotypes!  A Good Sky-Light, And an Operator that knows how to use it.  A Genuine Ambrotype, Including Case, Only 50 CTS.

Luther M. Brooks announces to the public that he has reopened the Ambrotype Rooms in Stewart’s Block.  These Rooms have recently undergone repairs, and are fitted up in a neat and tasty manner.  He has engaged the services of the celebrated Ambrotypist, William H. Rablen, who guarantees to make pictures as good as can be produced by the process.

Pictures set in Lockets, Pins, Bracelets, &c.  If you want a first-rate Picture, call and have it done by Rablen, at Brooks’ Sky and Side Light Gallery, Stewart’s Block, over Chapman & Barrour’s.

William H. Rablen appears in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Troy New York from 1854-1857.

[1] Dates and address from Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

G. W. & N. C. Pine

1853                Corner Grove & Congress Streets, Lansingburgh, New York.                                  1854                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

G. W. & N. C. Pine were recorded in two announcements in the Lansingburgh Democrat  (Lansingburgh, New York) and two advertisements in the Washington County People’s Journal  (Union Village, New York).  The first announcement appeared on July 14, 1853.  “True to life!”  “The most natural I ever saw!”  “They are decidedly the best I have yet seen in Lansingburgh!”  Such are some of the expressions that may be heard daily from persons who have paid Pine’s Mammoth Daguerrean Saloon, corner of Grove and Congress streets, a visit.  It seems to be a fixed fact that Pine is at the head of his profession, equal in rank to the best artists of the present day.

The second announcement appeared on July 28, 1853.  Never were there finer Daguerreotypes executed in the world than those daily produced by our friends, the Pines at their Mammoth Saloon, on the corner of Congress and Grove streets.—Rain or shine, they are always in readiness to wait on their friends, and “secure the shadow ere the substance fade,” with true Yankee genius.  The reason they meet with such great and unprecedented success is, they are among the first artists in the country, are affable in their manners, and will allow no one to leave with poor pictures.

The first advertisement ran from September 21 to October 12, 1854.

Wait, For The wagon!                                                                                                                                                Daguerreotypes, neat and fine,                                                                                                                           Daguerreotypes, rain or shine,                                                                                                            Daguerreotypes—by Messrs. Pine,

At their mammoth Daguerreotype Car, which will be in Union-Village about the 27th of September, and remain in the place for a few days only.

Improvements in Daguerreotypes.  Messrs. Pine take Miniatures with the New Crystal Back Ground, which greatly increases their beauty and permanence.

Please call and examine specimens.   G. W. & N. C. Pine.  Sept. 19, 1854.

The second advertisement ran from October 19 to November 30, 1854.  Ho! For The Wagon!  Pine Has Come!  Daguerreotyping in all its varieties, at Pine’s mammoth Car, which will remain in Union-Village for a short time.  Please call and examine specimens.

G. W & N.C. Pine are not recorded in other photographic directories.

E. Norton

1853                Rooms in Younglove’s Hall, Union Village, New York.

E. Norton was recorded in one advertisement that ran from July 28 to October 20, 1853 in the Union-Village Journal (Union, New York).  Daguerrean Rooms.  E. Norton Would announce to the citizens of Union Village and vicinity, that he still remains at Younglove’s Hall, where he would be happy to wait upon all who wish Perfect Likenesses.  Lockets, Pins, and Finger Rings, filled in the best manner.

E. Norton is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Nixon

1846                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

Nixon of the partnership of Grant & Nixon is recorded in one announcement that ran on August 27, 1846 in the Washington County Journal (Union Village, New York).  Premium Daguerreotype Miniatures.  We take much pleasure in commending the Miniature Gallery of Messrs. Grant & Nixon to the attention of our citizens and the public generally.  They are located in the same building with ourself and in the room directly opposite our office, where they are daily producing some of the finest Pictures and most exact Likenesses we have ever seen.  Their Pictures are beautifully drawn out and possess a clearness, richness, life-like accuracy and brilliancy of finish we have rarely seen equaled and never surpassed! They have likenesses of several eminent public men and a great variety of splendid specimens in the Photographic Art.  Of course you will not take our word for all this, but call and see for yourselves—when, we are quite sure you will not fail to let the Operators give you a sitting of 20 or 30 seconds, just to see what a few glances of the sun beams can do.

Nixon is not listed in other photographic directories.

George Morse

1856                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

George Morse was recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Washington County People’s Journal (Union Village, New York).  The announcement appeared on September 18, 1856.  Ambrotypes.—Our readers will perceive by the advertisement of Mr. Morse, that they have now an opportunity of procuring the new and beautiful style of picture called the Ambrotype.  The Ambrotype is generally adjusted superior to the daguerreotype.  Mr. M. and his associate, Mr. Rablen, are skillful operators; they have a good instrument, and keep on hand an excellent assortment of cases.  We have seen several pictures executed by them, which for richness of tone, beauty of finish and accuracy in delineating the human face divine, cannot well be surpassed, either in city or country.  Give them a call.

The advertisement ran from September 18 to November 27, 1856.  Ambrotypes.  George Morse, would respectfully announce to the citizens of Washington County and vicinity that he is now located for a few weeks at Union-Village for the purpose of making Ambrotypes.

He has engaged the services of Mr. W. H. Rablen, of Troy, who for the past 14 years has been engaged in Daguerreotyping in the principal cities in this State, and therefore has had an excellent opportunity of engaging in all new styles of Pictures as they have made their appearance.  Being among the first who launched into the Glass process and for the last 18 months practicing that branch alone, he confidently asserts that he will produce as good a Picture as can be produced by the Ambrotype process; for proof, bring along one of your best Ambrotypes and let him have a “shot at you.”

An Ambrotype is taken on Plate Glass, then hermetically sealed between two glasses, so that it cannot be effected by either air or water.  Mr. Morse returns his sincere thanks for the patronage that he has already met with.  Geo. Morse. September, 1856.

George Morse is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. J. Holmes

1850-1851       Rooms in Younglove’s Hall, Union Village , New York.

J. J. Holmes was recorded in two advertisements that ran in the Union-Village Journal (Union, New York).  The first advertisement ran from October 24 to December 26, 1850.  Sky-Light Daguerreotype Miniatures.  The subscriber respectfully announces to the public that he has returned to his old rooms in Younglove’s Hall, where he will be happy to serve those who may favor him with a call, with Daguerreotype Pictures of any size, single, or in groups, of any number.

Those wishing can be furnished with Sky-Light pictures, by which arrangements the heavy shade on one side of the face is avoided, giving an even and perfect shadow, and life like appearance.  Please call as soon as convenient, for my stay will depend on the amount of patronage I receive, for like all who live by eating, I have to pay for my corn.  J. J.  Holmes.

The second advertisement ran from February 6 to April 17, 1851.  Sky-Light Daguerreotype Miniatures For $1.00.  The subscriber respectfully announces to the public that he has returned to his old rooms in Younglove’s Hall, where he will be happy to serve those who may favor him with a call, with Daguerreotype Pictures of any size, single, or in groups, of any number.

Those wishing can be furnished with Sky-Light pictures, by which arrangements the heavy shade on one side of the face is avoided, giving an even and perfect shadow, and life like appearance.  Having but a short time longer to stay in this place, I will take Pictures from the date hereof for one dollar.  J. J. Holmes.

J. J. Holmes is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Union Village, New York in 1850-1851. Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a J. J. Holmes in Sandy Hill, Kingsbury, N. Y. in 1859, it is unknown if they are the same person.

Grant

1846                Address Unknown, Union Village, New York.

Grant was recorded in an announcement as part of the partnership of Grant & Nixon on August 27, 1846 in the Washington County Journal (Union Village, New York).  Premium Daguerreotype Miniatures.  We take much pleasure in commending the Miniature Gallery of Messrs. Grant & Nixon to the attention of our citizens and the public generally.  They are located in the same building with ourself and in the room directly opposite our office, where they are daily producing some of the finest Pictures and most exact Likenesses we have ever seen.  Their Pictures are beautifully drawn out and possess a clearness, richness, life-like accuracy and brilliancy of finish we have rarely seen equaled and never surpassed! They have likenesses of several eminent public men and a great variety of splendid specimens in the Photographic Art.  Of course you will not take our word for all this, but call and see for yourselves—when, we are quite sure you will not fail to let the Operators give you a sitting of 20 or 30 seconds, just to see what a few glances of the sun beams can do.

Grant and or Nixon are not recorded in other photographic directories, it is possible that Grant is H. R. Grant, based on the activity dates and location in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, but this is only speculation.