Tag Archives: Nashville Tennessee

Loiseau and Bulot

1858                Address Unknown, Nashville, Tennessee.

Loiseau and Bulot were recorded in an announcement on April 9, 1858 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Tennessee Historical Society…Messrs. Loiseau and Bulot presented a photograph of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, from a painting of John Ford.

Loiseau and Bulot are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Loiseau is possible Joseph Loiseau who is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Nashville in 1859-1861.

Augustus Larcombe

1856                40 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.                                                            1858                Corner of Cherry and Union Streets, Nashville, Tennessee.

Augustus Larcombe was recorded in two Announcements and four advertisements.  The first advertisement ran from March 11 to April 16, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American  (Nashville, Tennessee).  A. Larcombe, Ambrotypist.  No. 40, College Street, Corner of Union, Ambrotypes—the new Photographic Pictures on Glass, made by Cutting’s Patent Process, are now offered to the public as the most beautiful and only permanent likeness in the world.

All sizes and styles from Breastpins to Cabinet Portraits.  Daguerreotypes copied in Ambrotype.  Caution—Imitation Pictures got up by Daguerreotypist are not Ambrotypes.  One is perishable, the other immortal.  Genuine Ambrotypes are made at 40, College street and no where else in Nashville.

The first announcement appeared on October 26, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American  (Nashville, Tennessee).  Mechanics’ Institute.  Second Annual Exhibition.  Premiums Awarded…Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory……………………….5                                        J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…………5                                      A. Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes…………………….…………………..5                                    Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes…………………………….5

The second advertisement ran from November 13 to December 19, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Get The Best.  Larcombe’s Ambrotypes Took the first Premium over all competitors at the recent Exhibition, and are acknowledged to be the best Pictures in Tennessee.

Made as heretofore at New York and Philadelphia prices, and put up in tip top style at his Ambrotype Rooms, No. 40 College street, over Campbell & Donegan’s.

The third advertisement ran from February 1 to October 1, 1858 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  Get The Best.  The Genuine Ambrotype—the Premium Picture—is beyond comparison the best style of likeness yet introduced, and stands without rival:

Time cannot change them,                                                                                                                              Light cannot fade them,                                                                                                                            Dampness cannot mould them,                                                                                                                          Dust can never reach them,                                                                                                                                   Rust cannot corrode them.

Made as heretofore by Larcombe, Corner of Cherry and Union Streets, and put up in tip-top style at Eastern prices.  Made in no other rooms in Nashville.

The second announcement appeared on July 21, 1858 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  The Ambrotype Process.  This new process of photography upon glass excels all previous methods of taking portraits by the action of light.  The daguerreotype, it is well known, too commonly wears a sharp angular, harsh expression, arising from too strong a contrast of light and shade.  The photograph, on the contrary, is apt to wear a dull inanimate expression, and its unnatural hue is sometimes far from being agreeable.  By the ambrotype process entire precision of outline and naturalness of feature and expression are secured, while at the same time a tone of softness is diffused over the picture from the more graceful effect of light and shade upon a surface of glass.  Moreover, two pictures are obtained from one impression, the face of the glass exhibiting the sitter as he sees himself in a mirror, while the reverse shows him as he appears to others.  The latter is a very great advantage over either the daguerreotype or the photograph.  These always present a reversed picture, more natural to the eye of the subject himself than to others; but the ambrotype gives both the mirror face and the natural face.  It will probably be some considerable period of time before this beautiful branch of the art is brought to the highest state of perfection of which it is capable, but scarcely a week goes by without some improvement being announced.

Call on Larcombe if you would get an Ambrotype in its most perfect state.

The fourth advertisement ran from September 21, 1858 to November 28, 1859 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  Home Again!  Mr. Larcombe desires to inform his friends and the public generally that he has returned from his Northern tour, and is ready to open the fall campaign.

Fully posted in all recent improvements in Photographic Manipulation—relying, as heretofore, solely upon the merits of his pictures, and determined to spare no effort to please, he confidently invites those who have never given him a fair trial, to do so.

Ladies will find his present rooms the most conveniently and pleasantly located of any in the City, Cherry Street, corner of Union.

Augustus Larcombe is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Nashville starting in 1857.

M. F. Kayser

1854                College Street, over Myers & McGill’s new store, Nashville, Tennessee.

M. F. Kayser was recorded in an advertisement that ran from March 10 to April 7, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). Daguerreotype Miniatures.—The undersigned would respectfully announce to the citizens of Nashville and the public generally that he has taken rooms over Myers & McGill’s new Store, S. W. corner of the Square, for the purpose of taking Daguerreotype Miniatures.  He respectfully asks for a share of public patronage, and hopes by close attention to business to please all.  He may be found at his rooms at all hours of the day.  Entrance on College street, 1st door from the Square.  M. F. Kayser, Artist.

M. F. Kayser is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge

1856                Rooms over Hicks’ China Hall, Nashville, Tennessee

J. W. & E. S. Wood were recorded in an announcement on October 26, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). Mechanics’ Institute.  Second Annual Exhibition.  Premiums Awarded…   Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory……………………. 5.                                            J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…….…5.                                          A. Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes……………………………….……. 5.                            Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes……………………………5.

The identity of the J. W. is probably John Wood Dodge who was active in St. Louis, Missouri in 1855 and in Nashville, Tennessee from 1855-1858(+).  E. S. is probably Edward Samuel Dodge.  In looking through genealogical records I discovered that they were in fact brothers.  Both were painters and are recorded in the New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in American 1564-1860.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list Edward Samuel in Richmond, Virginia in 1844 and Augusta, Georgia in 1850-1853.  Early Georgia Photographers 1841-1861 a Biographical Checklist Compiled by E. Lee Eltzroth list him in in Augusta, Georgia from 1848-1853.

Dobyns & Hall

1853-1854       Address Unknown, Louisville, Kentucky.

Dobyns & Hall (Thomas Jefferson & Nicholas) were recorded in an advertisement that ran from August 17, 1853 to January 15, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Daguerran Stock And Picture Establishment.

Dobyns & Yearout, Nashville, Tennessee, College Street.                                                                        Dobyns & Hall, Louisville, Ky.                                                                                                                          Dobyns & Richardson, Morssewet, New York.                                                                                          Dobyns & Spaulding, St. Louis, Mo.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Yearout, Memphis, Tenn.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Harrington, New Orleans.

At any of the above establishments, you can procure as fine Pictures as can be had in any city, of any desired style or finish, as we have every improvement, and expect to keep up with any and all improvements.  We are prepared in either city to furnish artists with every article used in the art.  Our arrangements are such, we can furnish stock on the most reasonable terms.  Dobyns & Co.  N. B.—Pictures taken in any kind of Weather.

Dobyns and Hall are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Dobyns is the third photographer to have multiple franchises Followed by John Plumbe, Jr. and Jesse Harrison Whitehurst.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dobyns & Church

1853                Address Unknown, New York, New York.                                                                      1853-1854       59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

Dobyns & Church were first recorded in an announcement that ran on October 16, 1853 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Col. Dobyns, the extensive Daguerreotypist of Dobyns & Yearout, 59 College Street, who has just returned from his New York establishment, has several improvements which will be introduced in a few days.  We understand that the celebrated artists E. Church, so long and favorably known as one of the best in the city of New York, came out with the Col. For the purpose of remaining permanently in that gallery.  If he surpasses Yearout’s pictures, we should say Nashville will have something to be proud of.  We shall see what we shall see.

And secondly in an advertisement that ran from September 3 to December 30, 1854 in the

Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Notice.—The Copartnership heretofore existing under the firm of Dobyns & Church and Dobyns & Co., is dissolved.  No one is authorized to collect debts of the concern but Mr. J. T. Yearout.            T. J. Dobyns.

Thomas Jefferson Dobyns, Edwin Church and John T. Yearout are all known and are recorded in other photographic directories.  What may be new information is the relationship of Dobyns & Clark.

W. Cooper

1857                49 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

W. Cooper was recorded in an announcement on October 31, 1857 in The Winchester Home Journal (Winchester, Tennessee).  Portrait Painting.  W. Cooper, is permanently located in Nashville, at number 49, Church street, over Cornelius’ Furniture store, and is prepared to paint Portraits and Photographic Likenesses, from Miniature to Life size, at short notice, and entire satisfaction given.  Persons at a distance can send their pictures, which will answer all purposes.

W. Cooper is not listed in other photographic directories or in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1856-1860.

Edwin Church

1853                Address Unknown, New York, New York.                                                                          1853-1854     59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

Edwin Church was recorded first in an announcement in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee) on October 16, 1853.  Col. Dobyns, the extensive Daguerreotypist of Dobyns & Yearout, 59 College Street, who has just returned from his New York establishment, has several improvements which will be introduced in a few days.  We understand that the celebrated artists E. Church, so long and favorably known as one of the best in the city of New York, came out with the Col. For the purpose of remaining permanently in that gallery.  If he surpasses Yearout’s pictures, we should say Nashville will have something to be proud of.  We shall see what we shall see.

An advertisement appeared on September 3 and ran until December 3, 1854 in the same paper. Notice.—The Copartnership heretofore existing under the firm of Dobyns & Church and Dobyns & Co., is dissolved.  No one is authorized to collect debts of the concern but Mr. J. T. Yearout.T. J. Dobyns.

 While this is not new information it does clarify and add to John Craig’s entry for Church in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Frederick N. Hughes; and the Hughes Brothers. (Frederick N. & C. C.)

Activity:

1849-1851       83 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York

1852                Hines Hotel, Fayetteville, Tennessee.

1852                Union Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

1854-1855       59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

1854-1858       26 Union Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

1857                46 Public Square, over Hicks’ China Hall, Nashville, Tennessee.

 

John Craig in his Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list Frederick N. Hughes in New York City from 1849-1851.  To date no articles or advertisements have been found in the New York Daily Tribune or The Evening Post in addition none of the suburban New York papers that have been search have revealed anything. C. C. Hughes reported by Craig was also in New York City from 1851 to 1853. 1851 at 271 Bleecker Street; 1852-1853 at 4 Ames Street; and he speculates that in 1854 that Cyril Hughes is the same person and a daguerreian at 201 east 21st Street.  Like his brother no additional articles or advertisements have been found in the New York papers.

On March 11, 1852 an advertisement places Frederick in Fayetteville, Tennessee taking daguerreotypes at the Hines Hotel, which was on or near the Public Square.  It appears by the number of times that he has advertised that he made at least three visits to Fayetteville in 1852.  The first series of advertisements were on March 11 and on the 18th.  His second visit in which he advertised was on April 29, and his third visit from July 15 through August 5, 1852.  On November 18 he advertises that he has permanently relocated to Union Street in Nashville.

The first advertisement for F. N. Hughes found in the Nashville papers is not until October 31, 1854 in an advertisement for the Hughes Brothers Daguerrean Artists and Daguerreotype Stock Dealers.  It is learned from that advertisement that they purchase the Gallery from Dobyns & Co.  “The subscribers have the honor to inform their numerous friends, that owing to an increase of business they have purchased the Rooms lately occupied by Dobyns & Co.”  C. C. Hughes is listed on Union Street, over Streetch & Orr’s.  F. N. Hughes is listed at 59 College Street with the note (late Dobyns & Co.)  Hughes is not listed in any of the Advertisements for Dobyns, in fact an advertisement appears that list Dobyns’ Galleries and his partnerships.  They go on to say that our galleries are fitted up in a neat style, with powerful Sky-Lights…and in the Union Gallery they have a beautiful Piano for the use of the Ladies.

The Dobyns advertisement appeared on August 17, 1853 and ran until January 15, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American newspaper.

Daguerrean Stock And Picture Establishment.

Dobyns & Yearout, Nashville, Tennessee, College Street

Dobyns & Hall, Louisville, Ky.

Dobyns, Richardson & Morssewet, sic. Moissenet, New York City

Dobyns & Spaulding, St. Louis, Mo.

Dobyns & Yearout, Memphis, Tenn.

Dobyns & Harrington, New Orleans, Louisiana

At any of the above establishments, you can procure as fine Pictures as can be had in any city, of any desired style or finish, as we have every improvement, and expect to keep up with any and all improvements.  We are prepared in either city to furnish artists with every article used in the art.  Our arrangements are such, we can furnish stock on the most reasonable terms.

N.B.—Pictures taken in any kind of Weather. Dobyns & Co.

While we’re talking about Thomas Jefferson Dobyns, the following first names or initials of his partners follows.  Nicholas Hall; William H. Harrington; Felix Moissenet; V. L. Richardson; J. M. Spalding; and John T. Yearout.  Two other advertisements related to Dobyns in Nashville are worth mentioning on October 16, 1853 we learn that Edwin Church has accompanied Dobyns from New York to run the Nashville Gallery.  Then on September 3, 1854 the following notice appears—The Copartnership heretofore existing under the firm of Dobyns & Church and Dobyns & Co., is dissolved.  No one is authorized to collect debts of the concern but Mr. J. T. Yearout.          T. J. Dobyns.

Curious no announcements were located in the Nashville newspapers announcing this partnership.  Yearout was in charge of the Nashville and Memphis galleries prior to Church’s arrival and evidently charged with settling the accounts and disposing of the gallery.

In another advertisement for the Hughes Brothers that appeared on November 1, 1854 and ran until September 8, 1855 they added that they also have a powerful side and sky lights, the only ones in the city…In an advertisement in the Nashville Union and American that ran on September 9 to October 16, 1855 they now list themselves as photographic and daguerrean artists, and dealers in daguerreotype stock and apparatus. The same advertisement ran in the Daily Nashville True Whig from September 10 to November 27, 1855 and is the last time the 59 College Street address was listed.

Reported in the Daily Nashville True Whig on October 11, 1855.  The first annual Mechanics Fair of the Mechanics Institute closed on Saturday night, after having been the center of attraction to citizens and strangers for a week…Of daguerreotypes, specimens were exhibited by Messrs. Hughes Brothers and C. C. Giers, and of photographs by the former gentlemen.  These were highly finished specimens, and such as may be produced at the establishments of the exhibitors… The following day October 12 the list of Premiums appeared.

Class 26—Daguerreotypes, Photographs and Apparatus.

Hughes Brothers, daguerreotypes and photographs…..Diploma.

  1. C. Giers, daguerreotypes……………………………2nd class Diploma.
  2. McLain, daguerreotypes……………………………Honorable Mention.

On January 30, 1856 they start advertising themselves as ambrotype, photographic and daguerrean artists at 26 Union Street, Nashville.  They go on and elaborate ambrotypes, photographs, plain or colored in oil, and warranted as permanent as any other style of painting.  Daguerreotypes, stereoscopic, crayon or vignette, and every other style of pictures taken at this establishment.

They go on to say in the next paragraph that they recently introduced the ambrotype to Nashville and that they have become so popular that they have at great expense secured the services of a celebrated New York artist to attend to this branch of the business exclusively.  No name was ever mentioned in any of the advertisements associated with the Hughes Brothers to determine who this was.

On October 26, 1856 the premiums were announced for the second annual exhibition of the Mechanics’ Institute held on October 13 through 20.

Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory………………………………5

W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…………. 5

Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes……………………………………………………….5

Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes……………………………………5

A side note J. W. Dodge is John Wood Dodge (1807-1893) and E. S. Dodge is possibly Edward Samuel Dodge (1816-1857).  It is not known if there is any relation between the two men.  John Wood Dodge is identified through a website as being in Nashville.  Both are miniaturist John Wood is also described as a dioramist.  In researching both men in The New-York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1564–1860. There is no mention of either one being in Tennessee.  John Craig records in his Craig’s Daguerreian Register Edward Samuel Dodge as a miniature painter in New York City and Poughkeepsie and a Daguerrean in Richmond, Virginia in 1844, and in August, Georgia, between 1850-1853 and possibly earlier.  He sold his gallery in November with the intention to retire.  Craig does not document John Wood Dodge in his Registry.  Advertisements do indicate a partnership of Dodge & Wenderoth in 1855-1856.  On September 29, 1855 an advertisement in The Daily Nashville True Whig announces that they are in St. Louis, Missouri making Photographic Miniature Portraits, (crystalotype likenesses) and that they will be in Nashville in October for a short stay.  August Wenderoth is also a miniature painter.  The last advertisement for the partnership appeared on August 2, 1856.   A little over two months before the second annual exhibition of the Mechanics Institute Fair.

On November 23, 1856 the Hughes Brothers start to advertise that they are making colored ambrotypes and melainotypes for 50 cents.  Put up in first rate style, including case.  Others are charging one dollar, we will take for fifty cents and large ones $1.00. On December 5th they drop their price to forty-five cents.

In the Nashville Union and American on April 14, 1857, J. W. Dodge announces that he has sold his rooms, apparatus, and materials to the Hughes Brothers and plans to reside permanently at his home in Cumberland County.  He takes great pleasure in recommending them as his successors.  He goes on to say that they are gentlemen of skill and experience in their profession and have engaged a corps of artists of superior abilities.

No advertisements appear for J. W. Dodge for his photographic business or for a partnership with E. S. Dodge before or after the 1856 fair, and no death notice was located for E. S. Dodge who died on April 6, 1847.  There are a couple of article and an advertisements for a J. W. Dodge in Cumberland County that are unrelated to photography but are relevant.  On October 18, 1856 at the same fair he is awarded a premium for his display of apples. Pronounced the finest ever seen by all.  On October 22 an announcement that his apples will be sold at auction to-night at 8 P. M.  On November 15th in an article entitled Cumberland Mountain—Fine Fruit And Vegetables.  Which talks about the agricultural resources and access to the Cumberland Mountains and J. W. Dodge.  In this article the possibility that this is the same person changes to probably with the one sentence…Our clever artist friend, J. W. Dodge, Esq.  On December 28, 1856 Dodge advertises that he is selling a tract of land in the Cumberland Mountains.  In this advertisement it is confirms that this is the same person.  A plat of the land can be seen at my painting rooms, over Hick’s China Hall on the square.

The Fourth Annual Fair of the Mechanics’ Institute of Tennessee announced the list of awards on October 22, 1857 where the Hughes Brothers are given a diploma for their photographs, ambrotypes, melainotypes and sphereotypes.  They are the only photographers listed as having an award this year.  (*this should be the third not fourth fair.)

They continue to advertise without mentioning daguerreotypes until January 23, 1858 this advertisement ran until June 3.  A Great Rush!  Hughes Brothers, melainotypes, ambrotypes, photographic and daguerrean artist.  It’s always interesting to see how the daguerreotype is referred to after the introduction of the ambrotype.  Most of the time photographers advertising that they are now taking ambrotypes down play or should I say that they are vehemently opposed to the daguerreotype, they say almost like it’s a caned response in their argument that the daguerreotype is of an inferior quality, they complain about the reflection, and the fact that they are reversed, and that they fade, etc. The argument most photographers give is that the ambrotype is superior, it can be seen in any light, and the tones are richer.  It is refreshing to see that the Hughes Brothers did not use this tactic they continue to offer all processes.

Hughes Brothers, were listed together until 1858.  The last article for the Hughes Brothers was on May 8, 1858 in the Nashville Patriot.  And announce that they have been engaged to execute the likenesses of the delegates and Bishops of the M. E. Church General Conference now in session in Nashville, for the purpose of a steel engraving.

Frederick N. Hughes does not appear in the Nashville newspapers after the June 3d Advertisement.  C. C. Hughes appears through 1859 and continues in business into 1861 in Nashville according to Craig.