Tag Archives: Nashville Tennessee

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth

1855                Address Unknown, St. Louis, Missouri

1855-1856       Rooms over Hicks’ China Hall, North side of public Square, Nashville,                             Tennessee.

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth of the firm Dodge & Wenderoth was recorded on one announcement in The Daily Nashville True Whig and five announcements and one advertisement in the Nashville Union and American.   The announcement in The Daily Nashville True Whig  (Nashville, Tennessee) appeared on September 29, 1855.  Photographic Miniature Portraits.—Art has achieved a signal triumph in the Introduction of crystalotype likenesses.  In the hands of competent artists, Photography is destined to supersede miniature painting on ivory altogether.  The process is simple and sure.  The likeness is first daguerreotyped on glass, and then transferred to a very fine paper, prepared especially for the purpose.  They are then colored to the life.  The likenesses thus taken has all the accuracy of a daguerreotype, and all the beauty and finish of a painting.  They are much larger than the ordinary miniature, and can be furnished at about one-fourth the cost of the latter.  We noticed that our old friend, J. W. Dodge, formerly of this city, and whose skill as a miniature painter is well known here, has been for some taking likenesses upon this plan.  He is associated with Mr. Augustus Wenderoth, one of the finest artist in the Country.  We have before us a highly complimentary notice of their pictures from the St. Louis Republican.

We are pleased to learn that Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth will be in this city early October, and will open rooms for a short stay.—With the high reputation which Mr. D. enjoys here, and the acknowledge talent of his associate, there can be no doubt that they will find a lucrative patronage ready for them.

The first announcement in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee) appeared on December 23, 1855.  The Fine Arts—Photographic Miniature Portraits.—We take pleasure in calling the attention of our readers to the card of Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth in this morning’s paper.  Mr. Dodge is well known in this community as an artist who has no superior in this country in his peculiar department—miniatures on Ivory.  Hundreds of his pictures are in the possession of persons in Nashville alone—and whoever has the likeness of a valued friend from his pencil has a “thing of beauty” which will certainly be “a joy forever.”  Mr. D. has associated with him Mr. Wenderoth, an artist of the highest accomplishment, as an examination of some of his specimens will abundantly satisfy anyone.  Together they will not only furnish our citizens with those inimitable miniatures on ivory—celebrated wherever known—but what will prove, we believe, even more acceptable, are to furnish Photographic Miniature Portraits—a style of picture which is destined to a very great extent to supersede all others.  They present at once the faithfulness and accuracy of the daguerreotype, together with the beauty, finish, naturalness and ease of an oil painting—which they in reality are, more than any thing else.  The photographic process transfers to paper the form and feature with unmistakable accuracy in the minutest particulars, while the delicate touch of the artist’s pencil—a pencil already famous even without this aid—brings out in bold and striking relief a counterfeit presentment of the subject, perfect almost beyond credulity.—This photographic process enables the artist to enlarge the size of their pictures, and to prepare them with less labor, as well as more accuracy, and consequently at a reduced cost.  We advise those of our readers who are fond of the beautiful in art, after giving the card of Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth a reading, to call and examine some of their specimens, of which they have a few.  We can guarantee to the most matter-of-fact individual that he will find something in them to excite emotions of pleasure, and that he will at once resolve to have himself or some friend “done up” in their inimitable style.

The advertisement ran from December 23, 1855 to March 26, 1856.  To The Public.  A Card.  The undersigned would respectfully announce to his friends and the citizens of Nashville and vicinity, that he has returned to the city for the purpose of pursuing his profession, and that he has associated with him the talented Artist, Mr. F. Augustus Wenderoth, and he feels assured, from their success in another State, that their efforts in their profession cannot fail to be received with favor by the lovers of Art in Tennessee.  John W. Dodge.

The Fine Arts—Photographic Miniature Portraits.  Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth would make known to the citizens generally, that they have taken Rooms over “Hicks’ China Hall,” North side of the Public Square, and are now prepared to execute (in addition to Miniatures on Ivory) the new Photographic Miniature Portraits.  These pictures are from Locket to Cabinet size, forming handsome ornaments for the Palor.  They possess the faithfulness of the mirror with the expression and coloring of life, and are Perfectly Permanent.

Painted Photographic copies of various sizes, taken of Daguerreotypes, when accompanied with a description of the complexion, color of the eyes, hair, dress, &c.  Specimens of the different styles, painted and plain, can be examine at their Studio.              

The second announcement appeared on February 15, 1856.  Photographs Of The Legislature.—Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, the distinguished artists, will take a Photographic view of the interior of the House of Representatives, with the members (and we presume their lady friends in the gallery,) this morning at 10 o’clock, if the day proves a favorable one.  If the day should be unfavorable, the picture will be taken on the first bright day following, at the same hour.  The interior of the Senate chamber will be taken on the day after that of the House, at the same hour, if the weather is fair.

The third announcement appeared on February 16, 1856.  Interior View Of The Hall.  Mr. Parks submitted a resolution which had just been put into his hands, inviting Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, Photographic Artists, (conformably to their application,) to take a Photographic Miniature of the House of Representatives at any time it may suit their convenience, and requesting the Door-keepers to extend to them the necessary freedom of the Hall and facilities for that object: and he moved that the rule be suspended for its consideration.

And, accordingly, the rule was suspended, and the resolution was adopted….

The Speaker read to the House a communication from Dodge, the Photographic Artists, stating that he would be prepared to take his interior view of the Hall to morrow (Friday) morning at 10 o’clock, if it should be a fair day; and, if not, on the first fair day following, at the same hour….

The fourth announcement appeared on May 16, 1856.  Photographic Miniature Portraits.  The studio of our friends, Messrs. Dodge & Wenderoth, over Hicks’ China Hall, north side of the square, has become the very general resort of that large class of our citizens of both sexes so justly celebrated for their high appreciation and liberal patronage of every thing truly excellent in the fine arts.  The reputation of Nr, Dodge alone as a miniature painter on ivory, in this city, where he has been so long and so favorably known, is of itself sufficient to attract all connoisseurs.  But there are other no less important features connected with his studio.  The introduction of the new style of pictures, known as Photographic Miniature Portraits, proves a most successful card.  These pictures, when painted, possess all the beauty of the ivory miniature, and, in addition, all the accurateness of outline and feature of the daguerreotype.  Besides they have the advantage in point of size, and are less expense in proportion.  Mr. Wenderoth is himself one of the most accomplished miniature painters in the country, as the specimens of his workmanship abundantly prove.  In the art of Photographing he is entirely au fait, and with his superior apparatus can exhibit pictures equal, if not superior, to any ever taken in this or any other country.

Mr. Dodge has recently returned from a visit to his family in the mountains, and is prepared, in connection with Mr. W., to attend to all orders.  Photographic Miniature Portraits can be readily taken from Daguerreotypes or Portraits.  We recommend those who wish to see something really superior to visit the studio of Dodge & Wenderoth.

The fifth announcement appeared on August 2, 1856.  Bank of Tennessee—Counter Notice.—We saw yesterday some specimens, of a new issue of the Bank of Tennessee, of the denomination of ten dollars, issued in lieu of their red brick tens, which have been withdrawn.  These notes are payable at the counter of the Bank here, and are being put in circulation in this city.  As specimens of Bank note engraving, they are equal, if not superior to any thing we have ever seen.  The face of the bill in on a yellow ground, and presents fine miniatures of Jackson, Polk, and Hon. Cave Johnson, President—the first two taken from J. W. Dodge’s Ivory Miniatures, and the latter from a Photographic Miniature by Dodge & Wenderoth….

Frederick Augustus Wenderoth is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Nashville, Tennessee or in St. Louis, Missouri.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list a Frederick A. Wenderoth in Philadelphia in 1858-1860 he also list an August Wenderoth in San Francisco California and Charleston, South Carolina, it is unknow if they are the same person.

J. A. Mallory

1854                59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

J. A. Mallory[1] was mentioned in an announcement that appeared on September 16, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). The Fine Arts.  Amongst the numerous enterprises that are being pushed forward in our city, we notice the Daguerreian Establishment of Messrs. Dobbins [sic.] & Yearout, 59 College Street, over the dry goods store of Messrs. Stevenson & White.  We visited their galleries yesterday and found them fitting up their rooms and instruments.  One or both of these gentlemen have been absent from our city a considerable portion of the summer, visiting a number of the principal cities of the United States, where they also have similar establishments.  We are informed that they have secured the services of the celebrated artist, Mr. Mallory, who has been operating heretofore in the larger cities, North and West, and we have no doubt he will sustain here the high reputation that he has acquired in other places.  Here is what the St. Louis Herald says of him:

“‘Look On This Picture.’—The other day we were shown some of the finest specimens of the Daguerrean art ever seen in this city.  These pictures were life-like, mellow and beautiful.  They were taken by Mr. Mallory.  It may not be generally known, but there is as much difference in daguerreotypes as between cheese and chalk.—Some operators take pictures which others would be ashamed of.  Those who want a first-rate picture should call and get Mallory to ‘point his machine at them’ for about half a minute, and we will agree to treat if he doesn’t produce a ‘counterfeit presentment’ which will give satisfaction.”

We are also informed by the proprietors of this establishment that in addition to furnishing daguerreotype likenesses of the very first order, at very moderate prices, they import directly from Europe and the Eastern cities every description of stock used in their line, which they can and will sell to traveling operators as low as they can buy in New York, or elsewhere in the United States.  Such enterprise deserves encouragement.

J.  A. Mallory is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Memphis, Tennessee in 1855.

[1] Initial “J. A.”  From Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.

Loiseau and Bulot

1858                Address Unknown, Nashville, Tennessee.

Loiseau and Bulot were recorded in an announcement on April 9, 1858 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Tennessee Historical Society…Messrs. Loiseau and Bulot presented a photograph of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, from a painting of John Ford.

Loiseau and Bulot are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Loiseau is possible Joseph Loiseau who is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Nashville in 1859-1861.

Augustus Larcombe

1856                40 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.                                                            1858                Corner of Cherry and Union Streets, Nashville, Tennessee.

Augustus Larcombe was recorded in two Announcements and four advertisements.  The first advertisement ran from March 11 to April 16, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American  (Nashville, Tennessee).  A. Larcombe, Ambrotypist.  No. 40, College Street, Corner of Union, Ambrotypes—the new Photographic Pictures on Glass, made by Cutting’s Patent Process, are now offered to the public as the most beautiful and only permanent likeness in the world.

All sizes and styles from Breastpins to Cabinet Portraits.  Daguerreotypes copied in Ambrotype.  Caution—Imitation Pictures got up by Daguerreotypist are not Ambrotypes.  One is perishable, the other immortal.  Genuine Ambrotypes are made at 40, College street and no where else in Nashville.

The first announcement appeared on October 26, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American  (Nashville, Tennessee).  Mechanics’ Institute.  Second Annual Exhibition.  Premiums Awarded…Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory……………………….5                                        J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…………5                                      A. Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes…………………….…………………..5                                    Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes…………………………….5

The second advertisement ran from November 13 to December 19, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Get The Best.  Larcombe’s Ambrotypes Took the first Premium over all competitors at the recent Exhibition, and are acknowledged to be the best Pictures in Tennessee.

Made as heretofore at New York and Philadelphia prices, and put up in tip top style at his Ambrotype Rooms, No. 40 College street, over Campbell & Donegan’s.

The third advertisement ran from February 1 to October 1, 1858 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  Get The Best.  The Genuine Ambrotype—the Premium Picture—is beyond comparison the best style of likeness yet introduced, and stands without rival:

Time cannot change them,                                                                                                                              Light cannot fade them,                                                                                                                            Dampness cannot mould them,                                                                                                                          Dust can never reach them,                                                                                                                                   Rust cannot corrode them.

Made as heretofore by Larcombe, Corner of Cherry and Union Streets, and put up in tip-top style at Eastern prices.  Made in no other rooms in Nashville.

The second announcement appeared on July 21, 1858 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  The Ambrotype Process.  This new process of photography upon glass excels all previous methods of taking portraits by the action of light.  The daguerreotype, it is well known, too commonly wears a sharp angular, harsh expression, arising from too strong a contrast of light and shade.  The photograph, on the contrary, is apt to wear a dull inanimate expression, and its unnatural hue is sometimes far from being agreeable.  By the ambrotype process entire precision of outline and naturalness of feature and expression are secured, while at the same time a tone of softness is diffused over the picture from the more graceful effect of light and shade upon a surface of glass.  Moreover, two pictures are obtained from one impression, the face of the glass exhibiting the sitter as he sees himself in a mirror, while the reverse shows him as he appears to others.  The latter is a very great advantage over either the daguerreotype or the photograph.  These always present a reversed picture, more natural to the eye of the subject himself than to others; but the ambrotype gives both the mirror face and the natural face.  It will probably be some considerable period of time before this beautiful branch of the art is brought to the highest state of perfection of which it is capable, but scarcely a week goes by without some improvement being announced.

Call on Larcombe if you would get an Ambrotype in its most perfect state.

The fourth advertisement ran from September 21, 1858 to November 28, 1859 in the Nashville Patriot (Nashville, Tennessee).  Home Again!  Mr. Larcombe desires to inform his friends and the public generally that he has returned from his Northern tour, and is ready to open the fall campaign.

Fully posted in all recent improvements in Photographic Manipulation—relying, as heretofore, solely upon the merits of his pictures, and determined to spare no effort to please, he confidently invites those who have never given him a fair trial, to do so.

Ladies will find his present rooms the most conveniently and pleasantly located of any in the City, Cherry Street, corner of Union.

Augustus Larcombe is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being active in Nashville starting in 1857.

M. F. Kayser

1854                College Street, over Myers & McGill’s new store, Nashville, Tennessee.

M. F. Kayser was recorded in an advertisement that ran from March 10 to April 7, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). Daguerreotype Miniatures.—The undersigned would respectfully announce to the citizens of Nashville and the public generally that he has taken rooms over Myers & McGill’s new Store, S. W. corner of the Square, for the purpose of taking Daguerreotype Miniatures.  He respectfully asks for a share of public patronage, and hopes by close attention to business to please all.  He may be found at his rooms at all hours of the day.  Entrance on College street, 1st door from the Square.  M. F. Kayser, Artist.

M. F. Kayser is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge

1856                Rooms over Hicks’ China Hall, Nashville, Tennessee

J. W. & E. S. Wood were recorded in an announcement on October 26, 1856 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee). Mechanics’ Institute.  Second Annual Exhibition.  Premiums Awarded…   Class No. 6—Marble Work, Paintings, Drawing, Daguerreotypes, Etc.

J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Miniatures on Ivory……………………. 5.                                            J. W. & E. S. Dodge, Nashville, Photographs, plain and colored…….…5.                                          A. Larcomb, Nashville, Ambrotypes……………………………….……. 5.                            Hughes Brothers, Nashville, Daguerreotypes……………………………5.

The identity of the J. W. is probably John Wood Dodge who was active in St. Louis, Missouri in 1855 and in Nashville, Tennessee from 1855-1858(+).  E. S. is probably Edward Samuel Dodge.  In looking through genealogical records I discovered that they were in fact brothers.  Both were painters and are recorded in the New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artist in American 1564-1860.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry list Edward Samuel in Richmond, Virginia in 1844 and Augusta, Georgia in 1850-1853.  Early Georgia Photographers 1841-1861 a Biographical Checklist Compiled by E. Lee Eltzroth list him in in Augusta, Georgia from 1848-1853.

Dobyns & Hall

1853-1854       Address Unknown, Louisville, Kentucky.

Dobyns & Hall (Thomas Jefferson & Nicholas) were recorded in an advertisement that ran from August 17, 1853 to January 15, 1854 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Daguerran Stock And Picture Establishment.

Dobyns & Yearout, Nashville, Tennessee, College Street.                                                                        Dobyns & Hall, Louisville, Ky.                                                                                                                          Dobyns & Richardson, Morssewet, New York.                                                                                          Dobyns & Spaulding, St. Louis, Mo.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Yearout, Memphis, Tenn.                                                                                                              Dobyns & Harrington, New Orleans.

At any of the above establishments, you can procure as fine Pictures as can be had in any city, of any desired style or finish, as we have every improvement, and expect to keep up with any and all improvements.  We are prepared in either city to furnish artists with every article used in the art.  Our arrangements are such, we can furnish stock on the most reasonable terms.  Dobyns & Co.  N. B.—Pictures taken in any kind of Weather.

Dobyns and Hall are not recorded in other photographic directories.  Dobyns is the third photographer to have multiple franchises Followed by John Plumbe, Jr. and Jesse Harrison Whitehurst.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dobyns & Church

1853                Address Unknown, New York, New York.                                                                      1853-1854       59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

Dobyns & Church were first recorded in an announcement that ran on October 16, 1853 in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Col. Dobyns, the extensive Daguerreotypist of Dobyns & Yearout, 59 College Street, who has just returned from his New York establishment, has several improvements which will be introduced in a few days.  We understand that the celebrated artists E. Church, so long and favorably known as one of the best in the city of New York, came out with the Col. For the purpose of remaining permanently in that gallery.  If he surpasses Yearout’s pictures, we should say Nashville will have something to be proud of.  We shall see what we shall see.

And secondly in an advertisement that ran from September 3 to December 30, 1854 in the

Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee).  Notice.—The Copartnership heretofore existing under the firm of Dobyns & Church and Dobyns & Co., is dissolved.  No one is authorized to collect debts of the concern but Mr. J. T. Yearout.            T. J. Dobyns.

Thomas Jefferson Dobyns, Edwin Church and John T. Yearout are all known and are recorded in other photographic directories.  What may be new information is the relationship of Dobyns & Clark.

W. Cooper

1857                49 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

W. Cooper was recorded in an announcement on October 31, 1857 in The Winchester Home Journal (Winchester, Tennessee).  Portrait Painting.  W. Cooper, is permanently located in Nashville, at number 49, Church street, over Cornelius’ Furniture store, and is prepared to paint Portraits and Photographic Likenesses, from Miniature to Life size, at short notice, and entire satisfaction given.  Persons at a distance can send their pictures, which will answer all purposes.

W. Cooper is not listed in other photographic directories or in The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America 1856-1860.

Edwin Church

1853                Address Unknown, New York, New York.                                                                          1853-1854     59 College Street, Nashville, Tennessee.

Edwin Church was recorded first in an announcement in the Nashville Union and American (Nashville, Tennessee) on October 16, 1853.  Col. Dobyns, the extensive Daguerreotypist of Dobyns & Yearout, 59 College Street, who has just returned from his New York establishment, has several improvements which will be introduced in a few days.  We understand that the celebrated artists E. Church, so long and favorably known as one of the best in the city of New York, came out with the Col. For the purpose of remaining permanently in that gallery.  If he surpasses Yearout’s pictures, we should say Nashville will have something to be proud of.  We shall see what we shall see.

An advertisement appeared on September 3 and ran until December 3, 1854 in the same paper. Notice.—The Copartnership heretofore existing under the firm of Dobyns & Church and Dobyns & Co., is dissolved.  No one is authorized to collect debts of the concern but Mr. J. T. Yearout.T. J. Dobyns.

 While this is not new information it does clarify and add to John Craig’s entry for Church in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry.