Tag Archives: Ambrotypist

G. Weaver

1858-1859       Room in the Post Office Building, Sunbury, Pennsylvania.

G. Weaver appeared in six announcements in the Sunbury American (Sunbury, Pennsylvania).  The first announcement appeared on September 11, 1858.  Ambrotypes.—We are requested to say that Mr. Weaver, will remain but a few days longer in this place.  Persons who are desirous of procuring ambrotypes at his very low prices, are requested to call at his room over the Post Office, without delay.

The second appeared on 23, 1858.  We understand that Mr. G. Weaver, intends reopening his ambrotype Gallery in the Post Office building in a few days.

The third on October 30, 1858.  Life-like Ambrotypes taken in the Post Office building for 50 cents.

Fourth on April 9, 1859.  Life-like pictures taken in the Post Office building for 50 cents.

Fifth on April 23, 1859.  We understand that Mr. Weaver, will remain in this place but one week longer, those of our readers in want of life-like pictures of themselves for 37½ cents case included, will do well to give him a call.

Sixth on April 30, 1859.  For a few days longer ambrotypes will be taken for 37½ cents in the post office building.

G. Weaver is not recorded in other photographic directories. 

Watson

1858                Rooms Over the Drug Store, Glasgow, Missouri.

Watson was recorded in one advertisement that ran from June 3 to 10, 1858 in the Glasgow Weekly Times (Glasgow, Missouri).  Over The Drug Store. 

Dwellers in Glasgow! How little you know

The power of thy arts, whose glories I sing,

For they’re wafted to all, by breezes that blow,

From perennial lands of soft gentle spring,

For the Goddess of science has stopped in her flight

To deposit with us a gifted fair and bright!

And what do you think her majesty gave?

The “Camera Tube” that picture the brave,

The young or the old, the lovely and fair,

Oh really good gracious what a blessing it are.

Daguerreotypes Bright,

And Photographs right,

That index the face as truly as life:

With Ambrotypes new,

So faithful and true,

To picture the husband, son, daughter and wife.

Secure the shadow, ere the substance fade,

For time will cast o’er all a deeper shade,

And life-like ties soon be broken,

And farewell words yet to be spoken.

Now Watson’s Rooms are just the place,

To get a copy of your face;

They keep all right forever

And ne’er will dim, no never!

Come and see—

The sight is free!

Call All, At Watson’s.

Watson is not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Glasgow, Missouri. 

A. Watson

1857                83 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

1857-1859     77 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.

A. Watson is a complicated entry.  There are a total of twenty six advertisements and two announcements that were recorded from The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  Two advertisements and two announcements mentioned a Watson & Son, one of the announcements is recorded as Mrs. Watson and Son.  This is possibly a typo but further research is needed.  There are also a number of advertisements between December 8, 1857 to November 21, 1859 that only mention Watson.  The identification of the son is not recorded in any of the ads or announcements recorded.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does mention John W. Watson as being active in Richmond in 1859, it is possibly that he is the son.

 1.  Advertisement ran on October 23 & 24, 1857.  Genuine Double Glass Ambrotype Picture For 50 Cents, At Watson’s Melainotype And Ambrotype Gallery—On Friday, 23d Oct.—Fine Ambrotype Views of Niagara, taken on the spot by A. Watson.  Visitors wishing a view of the Falls, can secure a most accurate and imperishable mirror of the greatest cataract in the world.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine their specimens, as they need only to be seen to be appreciated. 

Remember, Watson intends to give his first week’s profits for the benefit of the poor of Richmond.  Pictures taken from 25 cents to $10.                                                                       

2.  Advertisement ran from October 26 to 31, 1857.  Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes, only 25 Cents.—Be sure and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25 and 37½ cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of this city.                                                                                                                 

3.  Advertisement ran from October 31 to November 27, 1857.  Watson’s Gives The Largest Ambrotypes, For Fifty Cents—Call and see Watson’s Double Glass Ambrotypes at 25, 37½, and 50 cents, before you have your likeness.  Rooms 83 Main street.  Malainotypes and Panotypes taken by him.  The whole of the first week’s profits to be given to the poor of the city.                                                                                             

4.  Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 10, 1857.  Proclamation.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case a Watson’s Gallery, 83 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.—Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best pictures taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                          

5.  Advertisement ran from December 8 to 10, 1857.  Removal.—Watson & Son have bought out the old Whitehurst Gallery lately occupied by Mr. Leitch, which they will open on Monday December 7, and are now prepared to take Pictures from 25 to 37½ cents with cases; and extra large for 50 cents with case, which are not to be equaled in the city, and which is regularly charged $1.  Medalions, Cameos, Maianotypes, and Panotypes, which can be sent in a letter to any part of the world.  His Ambrotypes are warranted not to fade.

Remember the old Whitehurst Gallery, 77 main street, Call and see for yourselves, his specimens, and where Photographs of all the United States Senators can be seen.              

6.  Advertisement ran from December 11 to 28, 1857.  Old Whitehurst Gallery.—This is to give notice that if you buy a case at Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main street, he gives you a handsome picture.  Excelsior Ambrotypes taken by him with handsome case, the largest in the city, for 50 cents, and for 25 and 37½, Medalions and Cameos taken in Silk Velvet cases for $1.  Also, Malainotypes and Panotypes, which may be sent in a letter, without extra postage.  All pictures taken at his Gallery warranted not to fade.  Old Daguerreotypes copied and pictures put in lockets.

N. B.—The best picture taken from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M.                                  

7.  Advertisement ran from December 28m, 1857 to January 28, 1858.  $500 worth of Jewelry and Fancy Cases received by the Jamestown for Watson & Son, for New Years’ Gifts.  A handsome case and picture for $1, which is regularly charged elsewhere $2 for.  What you buy at other places for $1 we give you for 50 cents.  Pictures from 25 cents up to $10.  Groups taken in large cases and charged as single ones.  Union case, with picture, for $1.  Melainotypes, Panotypes, and Ambrographs sent by mail for single postage.  Pictures for Lockets, Breastpins and Rings taken; and old Daguerreotypes copied.  Pictures taken rain or shine, 20 per cent cheaper than any other gallery.—Good fires always kept.  At Whitehurst’s old Gallery, No. 77 Main street                                                                                    

8.  Advertisement ran from January 27 to March 1, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow, Ere The Substance Fade.”—If you wish a fine picture, call at Whitehurst’s old Gallery, (the best skylight in the city,) and examine the specimens of art produced by Watson.  They are warranted not to fade, nor to be easily defaced—equal to the best in the United States, and 20 per cent cheaper than any other in the city.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M. to 5 P. M.  Pictures copied, and either enlarged or diminished.

Melainotypes and Penotypes, for transmission by mail.

Photographs, 1st sitting, $2; Duplicates $1 each.

Remember, 77 Main street.

9.  Advertisement appeared on March 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fail.”—At Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main street.  Photographs, either colored or plain, made from life, copied from Daguerreotypes or smaller pictures, and enlarged to any size.  Watson’s Ambrotypes, Maleinotype, Panotype, Ambrograph and Nelograph, a new style of Photograph, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes for letters, and are of a superior character. Colored or plain, and for beauty of finish are surpassed by none.  Pictures taken for 50 cents; Photographs 32 ; Duplicates $1.

Photograph of the Washington Monument, with Jefferson and Patrick Henry, for sale.  Price $1.

10.  Advertisement ran from March 6 to April 6, 1858.  “Secure The Shadow Ere The Shadow Fade.” If you wish a good picture go to  Whitehurst’s old Gallery, 77 Main st. and examine the Specimens, Photographs, colored or plain, made from life or copied from small pictures and enlarged to any size.  The pure Ambrotype we warrant not to fade or easily be defaced.  Watson’s unrivalled Niellograph or new style of Photograph pictures, taken instantaneously, and finished in three minutes.  Malainotypes, Panotypes and Ambrotypes for transmission by mail.  This gallery contains two of the largest skylights in Virginia, and for beauty of finish, his pictures are surpassed by none.

Pictures taken from 8 A. M., to 5 P. M.

Old Daguerreotypes copied.                                                                                      

11.  Advertisement ran from June 29 to August 3, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes pictures from 50 cents to $1, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil. The painting to be done by a first class Portrait Painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery, suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good pictures, an advantage, not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

12.  Advertisement ran from September 14 to October 14, 1858.  Watson has just returned from the springs, and will be happy to see his old friends and show them some of his celebrated Chrystal Miniatures, which will neither fade or rub out.

Life-size Pictures, in oil or pastille, at the shortest notice.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $100.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamships.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

13.  Advertisement ran from October 16 to November 15, 1858.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main Street.—Notice—Watson takes Pictures from 50cts to $1.  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes on leather, and Photographs of any size, plain or painted, either in pastille or oil.  The paintings to be done by a first class portrait painter.  He does not pretend to take them by the 1,000 or by the aid of machinery suitable for running railway cars or an ocean line of steamers.  He has two skylights, enabling him at all times to get good Pictures an advantage not possessed by any other Gallery in Richmond.                                        

The first announcement appeared on October 29, 1858.  The Mechanics’ Fair increases in interest, day by day…But, apart from these, are five specimens of sewing machines, always at work, while near them may be seen the photographic displays of Minnis and Watson, that of themselves are worth a visit….

The second announcement appeared on November 10, 1858.  The Fifth Annual Exhibition Of The Virginia Mechanics’ Institute…List of Premiums, Awarded by the Virginia Mechanics’ Institute, at its Fifth Annual Exhibition…

Ambrotypes, Daguerreotypes And Photographs.  Class No. 26.—

G. W. Minnis, for his collection, silver medal

Mrs. Watson & Son, for pictures on leather, honorable mention.

The Photographs by Fredericks, of New York, are very superior, but were entered too late for a premium.  The Committee of Judges, however, deem them worthy of high commendation.

14.  Advertisement ran from November 15 to December 18, 1858.  What’s The News?—Watson, at Whitehurst’s old gallery, 77 main street, is going to Europe, and is selling off his stock of fine Cases at cost, and he gives you a large sized Ambrotype for 50 cents—sold at $1 in any other gallery.

Photographs from $2 upwards.  Pictures put in medallion and breastpins for 75 cents.

Good fires constantly kept.                                                                            

15.  Advertisement ran from December 16 to 29, 1858.  Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.      

16.  Advertisement ran from December 30, 1858 to January 15, 1859.  Look Out.—Be In Time If you want a good Picture.  Watson is selling off his stock of fine Cases at coast, as he will shortly proceed to Europe, and if you do not wish to be artistically humbugged, go to him, for he gives you a true picture, warranted to give satisfaction, at Whitehurst old Gallery, 77 Main street, Richmond.  He puts Pictures in Medallions for 75 cents.  His Gallery and Pictures for sale.                                                                                 

17. Advertisement ran from January 26 to February 16, 1859.  Good and Cheap Pictures—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                         

18.  Advertisement ran from February 17 to March 9, 1859.  Positively Only For Two Weeks Longer—All who want good Pictures At Cost, should come at once to 77 Main Street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, as Watson will remain only a few more weeks longer.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

Advertisement ran from March 10 to 29, 1859.1859 March 10.  The Daily Dispatch.  (Richmond, Virginia.)  March 10, 1859, Vol. XV, No. 59, P. 2.

Whitehurst’s Old Gallery will open on the 14th inst, with an entire new stock of Cases, from 35 Cents and upwards.

Recollect, if you want cheap and good Pictures, you must call at 77 Main Street.

The Gallery and Fixtures are for sale, and will be sold low.                                     

19.  Advertisement ran from March 21 to April 20, 1859.  Gallery Of Fine Arts, 77, Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.  Important Notice.

Watson feels it due to his patrons and the public to tender them his warmest thanks for the generous support they have favored him with since he opened the above Gallery, and desires to inform them that circumstances has arisen which has induced him to abandon the project of returning to Europe for the present; and he is now receiving an entire new stock of cases of the best quality, which he is determined to sell at New York prices; and he intends to double his efforts to please all who may favor him with their patronage.

Every variety of picture produced by the Photographic art to be seen at his Gallery, which for style and workmanship, is equal to any produced in the city.  Here you can have a picture of surpassing beauty and size for 35 cents—unequalled by any other house—while Photographs, whole size 8 inches by 6 for $3; duplicates $1.  The public are invited to call and judge for themselves.

One Quarter size Camera, nearly new, for sale.                                            

20.  Advertisement ran from April 27 to May 14, 1859.  Great Excitement—By Telegraph—Watson, 77 Main street, Whitehurst’s old Gallery, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

21.  Advertisement ran from May 16 to 27, 1859.  Remember Watson—Whitehurst’s Gallery, 77 Main street—from Boston, Old England, has received, by the Europa, Stereoscopic Views taken in England, France, Italy, and the Holy Land, of Landscapes, Groups, and Statuary.—Call and see them.

The best style of Photographs taken by Watson for $1.  Likewise Ambrotypes for $35c.

Photographs, life size, colored in oil, or pastel, and copied from old Daguerreotypes and enlarged.                                                                                                           

22.  Advertisement ran from May 28 to June 23, 1859.  Grand Exhibition—Free—At Watson’s, (Whitehurst’s Old Gallery,) 77 Main st.—The public has no occasion to go to Europe to see Rome, the Holy Land, Paris or London, for he is constantly receiving views which are more perfect than scientific men ever dreamed of, for the perspective is perfect.  The finest statuary in the world; groups from life; views by gas light; views of the moon.  The whole for exhibition and for sale.  Call and see them.

Photographs for $1.

Ambrotypes from 35 cts upwards.

Pictures life size, copied or taken from life                                                   

23.  Advertisement ran from July 14 to August 18, 1859.  Great Excitement—25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.

24.  Advertisement ran from September 13 to October 13, 1859.  Selling Out To Leave, 50 per cent, Below Usual Price.—Great Excitement.25,000 People have visited Watson to see his splendid Stereoscopic Views, as well as to have their portraits taken.  His Portraits cannot be excelled; and for cheapness and durability are seldom equaled.  Call and see them.  Portraits from 35 cents; photographs from $1 to $25.  Old daguerreotypes copied or diminished to any size; painted either Water, Pastile, or Oil Colors, all worked up in India Ink.  Remember Watson’s, Whitehurst’s Old Gallery, 77 Main st.                           

25.  Advertisement ran from October 20 to November 19, 1859.  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  Selling Off!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  At Half Price!  Watson’s Gallery, 77 Main Street.  77 Main Street.  To Close Business, 77 Main Street.                                                                                

26.   Advertisement ran from November 21 to December 1, 1859.  By J. H. Diggs, Auct.  Whitehurst’s Old Gallery.—Having concluded to close our business in Richmond, we shall sell at public auction, on Friday Dec. 2d, 1859, at 10 o’clock A. M., (if fair; if not, the next fair day, at our residence, 77 Main street, a collection of Oil Paintings, Pastell do., Photographs, and other Pictures; also , at the same time and place, will be sold a good collection of Furniture: Sofas, Tete-a-Tete, Mahogany Chairs, Mahogany Tables, Glass Cases, velvet Frames of Rosewood, large mirrors, Screens, Beds and Bedding, Bedsteads, one large sign, Window Drapery, a large stock of Cases and Chemicals, a lot of Gilt Frames, &c., &c.  The above goods will be on exhibition till day of sale at our rooms, 77 Main st., Whitehurst’s old Gallery.  Watson & Son.  J. H. Digges, Auct.                                           

A. Watson and Watson & Son are not listed in other photographic directories.  According to Craig’s Daguerreian Registry John W. Watson was listed as being at the Whitehurst gallery in 1859, could this be the son?    

Waterman & Johnson

1856                82 South Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

Waterman & Johnson appeared in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York) on April 1, 1856 In an article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number Two, Philadelphia. The author visited 57 Galleries in Philadelphia.

Waterman & Johnson. — Very excellent ambrotypes, everything got up in the best order. Noticed no photographs on paper.

Waterman & Johnson are recorded in other photographic directories but are recorded here because of the first hand account of their work.


[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Directory of Pennsylvania Photographers, 1839-1900 (Linda A. Ries & Jay W. Ruby) and Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added. 

Frederick H. Warner

1856                Block’s Building, Camden, Arkansas.

1856-1857       Address Unknown, Camden, Arkansas.

1857                Address Unknown, Washington, Arkansas.

1857                Rooms in Odd Fellow’s Hall, Washington, Arkansas.

Frederick H. Warner was recorded in four advertisements in The Ouachita Herald (Camden, Arkansas) and one ad in the Washington Telegraph (Washington, Arkansas).  The first advertisement was recorded on May 22 & 26, 1856.  F. H. Warner Resident Ambrotypist & Daguerrean Artist, Camden, Ark.  Will open his rooms in July next, for the reception of Ladies and Gentlemen.

Ambrotypes, Sterescopes, and Daguerreotypes, will be taken in the best style.  His rooms will be open about two weeks—then closed until winter.  May 22, 1856.

The second advertisement appeared on May 22, 1856.  F. H. Warner Resident Daguerrean Artist, Camden, Will occasionally visit all the prominent towns in South Arkansas for the purpose of practicing his Art.  His rooms are in Block’s building, next door to Richmond’s corner, where he will be happy to wait on ladies and gentlemen who may favor him with a call.  Camden, Sept. 27, [1844].

The third advertisement appeared on October 2,  1856.  F. H. Warner Resident Ambrotypist & Daguerrean Artist, Camden, Ark.  Will open his rooms on the 1st December next, for the reception of Ladies and Gentlemen.

Ambrotypes, Sterescopes and Daguerreotypes will be taken in the best style.  His rooms will be open about two weeks—then closed until winter.  Sept. 11, 1856.

The fourth advertisement appeared on January 8 & 22, and March 5,1857.  F. H. Warner Artist, Has again opened his rooms in this place, where he is prepared to take Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spherotypes, Daguerreotypes &c., in the latest and most improved style.—Those wishing pictures will please call soon, as I expect to visit Washington in February.  Dec. 18, 1856.

The fifth advertisement appeared on November 25, 1857 in the Washington Telegraph (Washington, Arkansas).  Melainotypes and Ambrotypes.  F. W. Warner takes pleasure of informing the citizens of Washington and vicinity, that he is in their midst prepared to execute picture true to life.  All who wish to see themselves “as others see them,” would do well to call immediately, and secure their “shadow e’er the substance fades.”  An extra fine lot of Miniature Breastpins and Gold Lockets, &c.  Dark clothing best suited for a good picture.  He will remain in Washington but a short time positively.

Persons visiting Camden through the winter would do well to call at Warner’s large Sky Gallery. And examine his different style of pictures, which have no superior. 

Rooms in Odd Fellows’ Hall.  Washington, October 23, 1857.

Frederick H. Warner is recorded in Pioneer Photographers From The Mississippi To The Continental Divide A Biographical Dictionary, 1839-1865.  Note the dates at the end of each advertisement only a few issues were found of The Ouachita Herald and the Washington Telegraph.  In the second advertisement the date at the end is in brackets, because of the quality of the reproduction it’s a straight line, meaning it could only be a one or a four.  So it can’t be 1814 so it has to be 1844. Or it’s a typo, most likely 1854.  As newspapers and further research  become available hopefully his activity dates become clearer.

E. L. Walker

1856                205 or 359 Broadway, New York, New York.

1856                585 Broadway, New York, New York.

E. L. Walker was mentioned in three advertisements.  The first appeared in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) on December 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes And Melainotypes.—The most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker (formerly of Brady’s Gallery), now at the magnificent Gallery of C. D. Fredericks, Photographist, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The second advertisement appeared on December 12, 1856 in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  Ambrotypes And Melainotypes.—The Most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker, formerly of Brady’s gallery, now at the magnificent gallery of C. D. Fredricks, Photographist, 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

The third advertisement appeared on December 23,1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  Ambrotypes and Melainotypes.—The most beautiful specimens produced in this city are by E. L. Walker (formerly of Brady’s Gallery), now at the magnificent Gallery of C. D. Fredericks, Photographist, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Photographs.—Penabert of Paris, Photographist.  Finished in oil, aquarelle, and pastel, by the talented and inimitable corps of Parisian artists, introduced to this country by C. D. Fredericks, No. 585 Broadway, opposite Metropolitan Hotel.

Presents For The Holidays.—There is nothing so acceptable for a Holiday present as a beautiful Photograph, Daguerreotype, or Ambrotype, which should be secured as early as possible at Fredericks Magnificent Gallery, No. 585 Broadway, opposite the Metropolitan Hotel.

Advertisement ran on December 23 & 26, 1856.

E. L. Walker is not recorded in other photographic directories.  He was also not listed in the New York City Directories for the years 1855/1856; 1856/1857; 1857/1858.

G. A. Walden

1856                Address Unknown, Richmond, Virginia.

1856                Rooms at Rose’s Hotel, Yorkville, South Carolina.

1856                Rooms at the Palmetto Hotel, Yorkville, South Carolina.

1856                Rooms at the Lindsay Building, Yorkville, South Carolina.

G. A. Walden was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements in the Yorkville Enquirer (Yorkville, South Carolina).  The first announcement appeared on September 11, 1856.  Ambrotypes!  We are requested to direct attention to the Advertisement of Mr. G. A. Walden, of Richmond, Va., who has taken rooms at Rose’s Hotel, and proposes in fine style and at reasonable rates, to “Ambrotype” our community.  We have examined several very fair specimens which are ample recommendations of Mr. Walden’s skill as an artist.  Give him a call.

The first advertisement ran from September 11 to 25, 1856.  Ambrotype and Ichtheonotype.  G. A. Walden, of Richmond, Va.  Would inform the Ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity that he has taken rooms at Palmetto Hotel, where he is prepared to execute these beautiful pictures in the highest style of the art.  The Ambrotype is taken on glass, and unlike the Daguerreotype, without being reversed.  They can be viewed in any position with distinctness, as they are free from the glare of the metallic plate.  They cannot get dusty, and are impervious to water or acids, and cannot be tarnished or injured even by washing or rubbing, and will last for ages.  The superiority of these pictures in point of beauty and durability, has placed them at the head of the fine arts.

Possessing all the late improvements in the art, instruments and chemicals, he feels warranted in saying that his pictures shall be surpassed by none in the union. 

Portraits of deceased persons copied accurately.  Miniatures from life or paintings taken of any size.

Those only who have lost a dear relative or friend can know how much a Miniature is valued; and few think of this until it is too late.  Call, then, while an opportunity is afforded, for delays are dangerous.  These pictures can be taken in any weather, at a few moments sitting.  He warrants satisfaction, or no charge.

N. B.  Every Lady and Gentleman in the community is particularly invited to call and examine his specimens.  Call soon, as my stay will be short, owing to other engagements.

Instructions given in the Art of Ambrotyping, and apparatus furnished.  G. A. Walden.                  

The second announcement appeared on September 25, 1856.  Come One!  Come All!!  To Walden’s Daguerrean Gallery, in the Lindsay Building, and get an Ambrotype for One Dollar.  You can also have a nice Ambrotype out in your old Daguerreotype cases, for fifty cents.  Those who have daguerreotypes would do well to avail themselves of this opportunity, as his stay will be short in this place.  See advertisement in another column.                 

The second advertisement appeared on September 25, 1856.   Something New.  Ambrotype and Ichtheonotype.  G. A. Walden, of Richmond, VA.  Would inform the ladies and Gentlemen of this place and vicinity that he has taken rooms in the Lindsey Building, where he is prepared to execute these beautiful pictures in the highest style of the art.  the Ambrotype is taken on glass, and, unlike the Daguerreotype, without being reversed.  They can be viewed in any position with distinctness, as they are free from the glare of the metallic plate.  They cannot get dusty, and are impervious to water or acids, and cannot be tarnished or injured even by washing or rubbing, and will last for ages.  The superiority of these pictures in point of beauty and durability, has placed them at the head of the fine arts.

Possessing all the late improvements in the art, instruments and chemicals, he feels warranted in saying that his pictures shall be surpassed by none in the union. 

Portraits of deceased persons copied accurately.  Miniatures from life or paintings taken of any size.

Those only who have lost a dear relative or friend can know how much a Miniature is valued; and few think of this until it is too late.  Call, then, while an opportunity is afforded, for delays are dangerous.  These pictures can be taken in any weather, at a few moments sitting.  He warrants satisfaction, or no charge.

N. B.  Every Lady and Gentleman in the community is particularly invited to call and examine his specimens.  Call soon, as my stay will be short, owing to other engagements.

Instructions given in the Art of Ambrotyping, and apparatus furnished.  G. A. Walden.  Sept. 15.

G. A. Walden is not recorded in other photographic directories.

N. Wakefield

1858                Rooms formerly occupied by the Plymouth Bank, Plymouth, Indiana.

N. Wakefield was recorded in two advertisements in the Marshall County Democrat. (Plymouth, Indiana).  The first advertisement ran from January 7 to April 29, 1858.  Sky-Light Ambrotype Rooms.  Having fitted up a pleasant suit of rooms with a Sky-light, in the room formerly occupied by the Plymouth Bank, adjoining Westervelt’s old stand, where you will always find me ready  to take your pictures in any style or form, and at any price from 50 Cts. To $10.00, And on Glass, Iron, Leather or paper.  Satisfaction given or no charge.  All are invited to call and sit for Pictures whether they wish to buy or not.  N. Wakefield, Resident Artist.               

The second advertisement ran from January 7 to April 15, 1858.  Sky-Light Ambrotype Rooms!  All You That Want To See yourself as you are, true and lifelike, will please call at my new Ambrotype Rooms and get a Picture, as it will only cost you Fifty Cents!

As I intend to remain here, I have taken great pains in fitting up my rooms to make them pleasant.  You will find me in the room formerly occupied by the Plymouth Bank.

One and All,  

Are invited to call,

And if you don’t wish to buy,

You may before you die!

N, Wakefield, Resident Artist. N. Wakefield is not recorded in other photographic directories.             

A. P. Vlasto

1856                423 Broadway, New York, New York.

A. P. Vlasto was recorded in one advertisement and one announcement.  The advertisement appeared in The New York Herald (New York, New York) on March 30, 1856.  Vlasto’s Photograph, Ambrotype and Daguerreotype gallery, 423 Broadway, three doors above Canal street.—Pictures of the finest class taken in every style.  Prices moderate.  The public are respectfully invited to examine the specimens of superior photographs, &c.  A. P. Vlasto.

The announcement appeared on June 26, 1856 in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York).  An Artist Taking Poison.—Mr. A. P. Vlasto, a daguerreian artist doing business at No. 423 Broadway, was on Wednesday morning found lying on the floor of his gallery, insensible and quite stupid, as supposed from the effects of a dose of poison which, doubtless, he had purchased and taken the evening previous.  When the discovery was made, a physician was called in at once and applied the usual remedies in such cases, but there are scarcely any hopes of recovery.  The cause which induced Mr. Vlasto to take the poison was not ascertained; but if death ensues further particulars respecting the matter will be learned.  He it is said, had no pecuniary embarrassments.

A.P. Vlasto is not recorded in other photographic directories.

L. M. Verbois

1857                Address Unknown, Thibodaux, Louisiana.

1857                Address Unknown, Grosse Tete, Louisiana.

L. M. Verbois was recorded in two announcements and one advertisement in the Southern Sentinel (Plaquemine, Louisiana).  The first announcement appeared on May 9, 1857.  Ambrotypes.  If it is not already publicly known, it will be in a few days, that Capt. Verbois, having made himself thoroughly acquainted with the art of Ambrotyping, under the tuition of that celebrated artist, Mr. Chas. Wilson, will commence the practice of his artr forthwith on the opposite side of the river.  His specimens that we have seen are in no way inferior to those of his tutor, and we feel sure that he can give the highest satisfaction.  The Thibodaux Minerva thus speaks of the captain:

We have concluded to pay our distresses to Capt. Greenwood, better known to his numerous friends from New Orleans to Bayou Sara, as le Capitaine Verbois, the Professor’s (Wilson) student and worthy assistant in his beautiful art.  The Captain has now been a student of the Professor for over four months, and some of his essays at counterfeiting the human face are equal if not superior, in some instances, to those of the Professor himself.—In fact, in due course of time we have no hesitancy in believing that the Captain will be as proficient in picture taking as he is, or has been, in commanding a steamboat.  This is our opinion, and we wish it circulated among his numerous country friends in the river parishes, where he intends to pursue his calling at the end of his present stay in Thibodaux.

The second announcement appeared on August 1, 1857.  Ambrotypes.—Those of our friends on the Bayou Grosse Tete, who would be glad to have an excellent Ambrotype portrait of themselves or family, will be pleased to learn, by his card, that Capt. Verbois is about to visit their section, as we can recommend him as a first rate artist.

The advertisement ran from August 1 to 22, 1857.  To the People of Grosse Tete.  Ambrotypes.—The undersign respectfully informs the citizens of Grosse Tete that he designs visiting that section the coming week.  He guarantees that his Pictures shall be faithful likenesses and taken in the highest order of the art—surpassed by none.  Lose not the present opportunity.  L. M. Verbois.

L. M. Verbois is not recorded in other photographic directories.