Category Archives: Manufacturer

William Loyd

1856                522 Broadway, New York, New York.

William Loyd was recorded in five advertisements in The New York Herald (New York, New York) in association with Langenheim Brothers.  The first advertisement appeared on April 7, 1856.  W. Loyd’s Improved Stereoscope, with F. Langenheim’s new series of American views— Niagara Falls, Genesee Valley, The Pottsville Coal Region, and other new views. A large assortment just received, by Benj. Pike & Sons, 518 Broadway.

The second advertisement appeared on August 6, 1856.  Loyd’s Patent Improved Stereoscope, with Langenheim’s new series of American views, upon glass, and colored to nature.  Publication office 522 Broadway, opposite the St. Nicholas.  William Loyd, sole proprietor of Langenheim’s stereoscopic views.

The third advertisement ran from September 3 to 6, 1856.  Langenheim’s Stereoscopic Views upon glass.—Just received, a fresh supply of new and interesting scenery.  Dealers supplied at the publication office and photographic studio of William Loyd and F. Langenheim, 522 Broadway, opposite St. Nicholas Hotel.

The fourth advertisement appeared on December 13, 1856.  Loyd’s Improved Stereoscope Case with Langenheim’s views upon glass.  Sold by Pike & Sons; B. Pike, Jr., and Appleton & Co.  Dealers furnished with the above.  Terms cash.  William Loyd.  188 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, and 522 Broadway.

The fifth ad appeared on December 26, 1857.  The American Stereoscopic Company’s New series of views on glass and colored to nature are sold by Benjamin Pike & Sons, Benj. Pike, Jr., Wiley & Halstead, Broadway; F. J. Emmerich, 111 Fulton street.  Dealers supplied by Langenheim, Loyd & Co., Philadelphia.

William Loyd also spelled Lloyd is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Register as William Lloyd, but does not include the Langenheim connection.

Official 1853 Catalogue Of The New York Exhibition Of The Industry Of All Nations

The official 1853 catalogue of the New York exhibition of the industry of all nations’ list 43 American daguerreotype artist or manufacturers.  The information in the official catalogue gives a brief description of what is being exhibited.  Exhibitors name and address or in some cases just the city and state.  Most but not all of the biggest names in the industry are exhibiting daguerreotypes and a few are exhibiting paper photographs (crystalotypes).  Missing from the exhibition most notably is Southworth & Hawes, Langenheim Brothers and everyone west of St. Louis.  A few names are misspelled, and a few surprises, a doctor and a sculptor in addition Whipple is listed as a manufacture not a daguerrean artist or photographer.  Twelve states are represented along with the names of the photographers or manufacturers they are.

Connecticut—three;  Sheldon K. Nichols, Scovill Manufacturing Co., A. Washington.      Illinois—three;  Alexander Hesler, C. C. Kesst, Captain P. Von Schneidau.                        Kentucky—one;  E. L. Webster.                                                                                                          Louisiana—one;  F. Moissinet.                                                                                                                  Maine—one;  George M. Howe.                                                                                                        Maryland—two;  Henry Pollock, Jesse H. Whitehurst.                                                        Massachusetts—three;  Silas Durkee, M. D., Masury & Silsbee, John A. Whipple.                  Missouri—two;  J. H. Fitzgibbon, Edward Long.                                                                                    New Jersey—one;  David Clark.                                                                                                                  New York City & Brooklyn—seventeen;  Edward Anthony, A. J. Beals, Matthew B. Brady, James Brown, Jeremiah Gurney, Phillip Hass, Harrison & Hill, Charles C. Harrison, Henry E. Insley, Martin M. Lawrence, William & William H. Lewis, Charles C. Lincoln, Meade Brothers, Loins V. J. Peeiffer, Samuel Root, Charles H. Williamson, Anthony C. Zucky.                           New York state—two;  Donald McDonell, New York State Daguerrean Association.                    Ohio—five;  S. P. Barnaby, A. Bisbee, Thomas Faris, E. C. Hawkins, William E. North.  Pennsylvania—two; Ernest Van Heeringen, M. A. Root.

The Catalogue:

43.  Collection of large crayon daguerreotypes, and daguerreotypes by the ordinary process.—Samuel Root, Daguerrean Artist, 363 Broadway, New York City.

44.  Collection of specimens of the art of daguerreotyping, talbotyping and crystallotyping.—M. A. Root, Daguerrean Artist, 140 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, [Pennsylvania.]

45.  Frame of Daguerreotypes—Phillip Haas, Daguerrean Artist, 371 Broadway, New York       City.

46.  Collection of daguerreotype portraits—Jeremiah Gurney, 349 Broadway, New York City.

47.  Solographs, plain and colored, nebular Daguerreotypes— E. C. Hawkins, Daguerrean     Artist, Cincinnati, Ohio.

48.  Specimens of the daguerreotype art on extra large plates— Anthony, Edward—308      Broadway, New York City.

49.  Portraits in daguerreotype.—S. P. Barnaby, Daguerrean Artist, Dayton, Ohio.

50.  Specimens of daguerreotyping.—William E. North, Daguerrean Artist, Cleveland, Ohio.

51.  Specimens of the daguerreotypie art.—E. L. Webster, Daguerrean Artists, Louisville,      Kentucky.

52.  Daguerreotype pictures.—Ernest Van Heeringen, Daguerrean Artist, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

53.  Specimens of daguerreotyping.—Sheldon K. Nichols, Daguerrean Artist, 168 Main   Street, Hartford, Connecticut.

54.  A variety of daguerreotype picture.—Anthony C. Zucky, Daguerrean Artist, 499      Broadway, New York City.

55.  Daguerreotype pictures.—Capt. P. Von Schneidau, Daguerreotypist, 142 Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois.

56.  A collection of daguerreotypes.—Henry Pollock, Daguerreotypist, 155 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.

57.  Daguerreotype miniatures.—Thomas Faris, Daguerrean Artist,. Cincinnati, Ohio.

58.  Collection of daguerreotype miniatures.—Masury & Silsbee, Daguerrean Artists, 299½ Washington street, Boston, Massachusetts.

59.  Collection of daguerreotypes.—J. H. Whitehurst, Daguerrean Artist, 205 Baltimore        street, Baltimore, Maryland.

60.  Collection of illuminated daguerreotypes.—Henry E. Insley, Daguerreotypist,             311 Broadway, New York City.

61.  Daguerreotypes of two monuments.—Louis V. J. Pfeiffer, [sic.] Peeiffer, Sculptors, 5     Second Avenue, New York City.

62.  A large collection of photographic portraits and pictures from members of the             association.—New York State Daguerrean Association, (George N. Barnard, Sec.),   Oswego, New York.

63.  Improved coating box for the daguerreotype process.  Card distributing apparatus.  (Patent applied for)—William & William H. Lewis, Manufacturer, 63 Elizabeth street,          New York City.

64.  Collection of microscopic objects in physiology and natural history, prepared by the exhibitor.—Silas Durkee, M. D., Boston, Massachusetts.

65.  Specimens of daguerreotype portraits on full size plate.—A. Washington, Daguerrean     Artist, Hartford, Connecticut.

66.  Daguerreotype pictures, embracing panoramic views of Galena city, Falls of St. Anthony; Min-ne-ha-ha Falls, and a collection of portraits.—Alex Hesler, Daguerrean Artist, Galena, Illinois.

67.  Daguerreotype specimens.—Charles C. Lincoln, Daguerrean Artist, 182 Fulton street,  Brooklyn, New York.

68.  Daguerreotype instruments and cameras of various sizes.—Charles C. Harrison,         Manufacturer, 85 Duane street, New York City.

69.  Daguerreotype portraits.—David Clark, Daguerrean Artist, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

70.  Daguerreotypes by the common method.  Specimens of Crystallotypes; or daguerreotypes taken by means of glass upon prepared paper.—John A. Whipple, patent and Manufacturer, 96 Washington street, Boston, Massachusetts.

71.  Specimens of daguerreotype portraits.—Edward Long, Daguerrean Artist, St. Louis, Missouri.

72.  A collection of daguerreotypes.—Martin M. Lawrence, Daguerrean Artist, 203 & 381 Broadway, New York City.

73.  Collection of daguerreotypes.—F. Moissinet, Daguerrean Artist, New Orleans, Louisiana.

74.  Collection of daguerreotype pictures.—Donald McDonell, Daguerreotypist, Buffalo,          New York.

75.  Collection of daguerreotypes in frames.—A. J. Beals, Daguerrean Artist,, 156 Broadway,  New York City.

76.  Various specimens of daguerreotypes.—C. C. Kessy, Daguerrean Artist, 96 Lake street,     Chicago, Illinois.

77.  Daguerreotype apparatus and materials of all descriptions.—Edward Anthony,             Manufacturer, 308 Broadway, New York City.

78.  Descriptive daguerreotypes.—Harrison & Hills, Daguerrean Artist, 288 Fulton street, New York City.

79.  Tableau of elegantly mounted daguerreotypes.—J. H. Fitzgibbons, Daguerrean Artist, St. Louis Missouri.

80.  Daguerreotypes representing Shakespeare’s “Seven ages of men;” taken from life-     subjects.  Portrait of Daguerre, from life.  Groups of various portraits of full and half           sizes.—Meade Brothers, Daguerrean Artist, 233 Broadway, New York City.

81.  Collection of daguerreotypes—Matthew B. Brady, Daguerrean Artist, 205 & 359      Broadway, New York City.

82.  Specimens of daguerreotypes.—George M. Howe, Daguerrean Artist, Portland, Maine.

83.  Collection of daguerreotypes.—James Brown, Daguerreotypist, 181 Broadway, New     York City.

84.  Framed tableau of fine daguerreotypes.—Charles H. Williamson, Daguerrean Artist, 249 Fulton street, Brooklyn, New York City.

85.  Daguerreotype apparatus.  Cases and prepared plates of all sizes and qualities.—Scovill Manufacturing Co., Waterbury, Connecticut.  Office 57 Maiden Lane, New York City.

Part 2 introduction to the Daguerreotype exhibit posted tomorrow 4/23/18.

Louis Beckers

Louis Beckers is recorded in an advertisement in the Delaware Gazette (Delhi, New York) on April 7, 1847, in the partnership of Langenheim & Beckers, No. 201 Broadway, New York. They are the sole agency for the sale of Voiglander’s Daguerreotype Instruments and L. Beckers’ Chemicals.

Louis Becker is list in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry as being in Philadelphia but not in New York or in the partnership with the Langenheim Brothers.

William T. Anderson

Anderson was first listed in the 1844 Boston City Directory with no occupation listed and has a house at 10 Central Street; in 1845 he is not listed in the directory; he is listed in the Boston City Directory in 1846 with an occupation of collar maker, he lives at 50 Billerica; the 1846/1847 Boston City Directory list his occupation as Daguerreotype Composition Factory with no business address, he is still living at 50 Billerica; In 1847/1848 directory he is not listed; In the 1848/1849 Directory his occupation is Manufacturer of Artists Colors & Paints, business address is 13 East Dedham and lives at 3 Hamburgh; 1849/1850 again he is not listed in the residence listings; 1850/1851 Directory he is listed as a Chemist with no business address listed, House at Hooton Court; 1851 Directory he is not listed; and In the 1852 Directory his occupation is listed as Manufacturer Printers Ink, and house at 95 Marginal Street.

What is a Daguerreotype Composition Factory? One can only speculate that based on Anderson’s occupations that it has something to do with manufacturing pigments for coloring daguerreotypes.

The original information about the Daguerreotype Composition Factory was brought to my attention by Ronald J. and Mary S. Zboray while they were doing research at the Massachusetts Historical Society.  William T. Anderson is not included in A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers, 1839-1900.