Tag Archives: Bath Maine

Benjamin Franklin Upton

1850-1856       45 Front Street, Bath, Maine.

N. D.               Rooms over Mr. Baker’s Store, Brunswick, Maine.

1852                Rooms over Mr. Baker’s Store, Brunswick, Maine.

Benjamin Franklin Upton was recorded in twelve advertisements and eleven announcements in the Eastern Times (Bath, Maine) and one Patent announcement in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement ran from July 18 to September 26, 1850.  Daguerreotype Rooms.  B. F. Upton respectfully announces to the ladies and gentlemen of Bath and vicinity, that he has taken the rooms formerly occupied by Mr. J. W. C. Morrison, where he will be happy to supply any in want with superior Daguerreotype Miniatures.

All are invited to call and examine specimens.

The first announcement appeared on August 8, 1850.  We had the pleasure, a few days since of examining  some excellent specimens of the Daguerreotype art, executed by Mr. B. F. Upton, at the Rooms formerly occupied by Mr. Morrison.  They were of superior finish—and not excelled, in any respect, we believe, by any specimens we have seen.  Mr. U, is now preparing several pictures for the purpose of exhibition at the Mechanics’ Fair, soon to be holden in Boston.  We are satisfied that those already prepared, are not, to say the least, inferior to any that have formerly taken the prize.

The second advertisement ran from September 26 to October 31, 1850.  B. F. Upton’s Daguerreotype Rooms, No. 45 Front Street, Bath, Maine.

The third advertisement ran from November 7 to December 19, 1850.  Daguerreotypes, Upton 45 Front Street.

The second announcement appeared on December 19, 1850.  Upton’s Daguerreotypes are now acknowledged to be superior to any produced in our city; and inferior to none in the country.  This is clearly attested by the crowds who visit his rooms, 45 Front street.  Give him a call, and—our word for it—you will not be disappointed.

The fourth advertisement ran from December 19, 1850 to February 20, 1851.  The Union Meeting Having passed off to the satisfaction of all true friends of the constitution, public attention is now being directed to Upton’s Daguerreotype Rooms, 45 Front Street.  Mr. Upton respectfully informs his customers that he has reduced his prices, so that none who wish for pictures can find an excuse for not embracing the present opportunity.

The fifth advertisement ran from February 27 to May 8, 1851.  Upton’s Daguerreotype Rooms, 45 Front Street 45.

The third announcement appeared on March 13, 1851.  Mr. B. F. Upton is without doubt one of the best daguerreotype operators in the country.  He has for many years given this business his entire attention, and none who visit his rooms at 45 Front St., can for a moment question his facilities for producing a perfect picture.  Strangers visiting the city will do well to give him a call.

The fourth announcement appeared on April 17, 1851.  Daguerreotypes.  In procuring a daguerreotype of yourself or friends, it is important that you employ an artist who thoroughly understands his business, and who is in every way capable of giving you a perfect picture.—Mr. B. F. Upton, 45 Front street, is a gentleman who has become celebrated for his beautiful and lifelike daguerreotypes.

The sixth advertisement ran from May 15 to August 21, 1851.  Upton’s Picture Rooms 45 Front Street.

The seventh advertisement ran from August 28 to September 18, 1851.  B. F. Upton’s Daguerreotype Rooms, 45 Front Street.  45

The fifth announcement appeared on January 8, 1852.  Mr. Upton Will be at his old Daguerreotype Rooms over Mr. Baker’s store in Brunswick, next week, commencing Jan. 12.

The eighth advertisement ran from April 8 to July 29, 1852.  Daguerreotypes, By Upton, 45 Front Street, 45.

The sixth announcement appeared on May 6, 1852.  Portrait Painting!  Swift, The Artist, Will open Rooms on or about the 10th of May, where he will be happy to receive orders from any who may wish to patronize his beautiful style of painting—a specimen of which may be seen at Mr. Upton’s Daguerrean Rooms.

Paintings true to life from Miniatures. Perfect satisfaction warranted.

The ninth advertisement ran from August 8 to September 2, 1852.  Daguerreotypes.  Mr. Upton is now at his rooms in Bath, No. 45 Front Street.

The tenth advertisement ran from August 5 to October 14, 1852.  Commencement.  Mr. Upton will be in Brunswick again some days previous to, and after commencement.  A fine opportunity will thus be presented for visitors to obtain Daguerreotypes.  This will probably be the last time he will visit Brunswick.  Terms as reasonable as can be found anywhere.

The seventh announcement appeared on April 28, 1853.  Patents.—Among the list of patents just issued, we noticed one to our townsman, B. F. Upton, for Improvement in Mercury Baths for Daguerreotyping.  [9,666][1]

The eleventh advertisement ran from September 9, 1852 to November 22, 1855.  Daguerreotypes, By Upton, 45 Front Street.  45.

The seventh announcement appeared on October 1, 1854 in The New York Herald (New York, New York). New Patents Issued…for week ending September 19, 1854.  Benjamin F. Upton, of Bath, Me., for improved apparatus for polishing daguerreotype plates.  [patent No. 11,709.]

The eighth announcement appeared on January 4, 1855.  The nearest thing for a New Year’s Present is one of Upton’s Daguerreotypes.  He is the prince of artists in this community, as is generally conceded.

The ninth announcement appeared on October 18, 1855.  Sagadahoc County Fair.  The Cattle Show and Fair of the Sagadahoc Agricultural and Horticultural Society, at Topsham last week, was a very creditable affair…

Daguerreotypes.—All the specimens of this beautiful and truly valuable art, which enables us to carry with us always the faces of our friends, were presented by the well known artist, B. F. Upton—his portraits may without suffering be compared with any which adorn the celebrated galleries of our larger cities.  The committee noticed the whole sized portrait of Dea. A. R. Mitchell as remarkable for accuracy and distinctness; a whole sized representation of two ladies as showing great taste in arranging the posture and catching the living expression of subjects, and also half sized portraits of Rev. Dr. Tappan and Elihu Burrett as remarkable for depth and richness of tone.

The tenth announcement appeared on November 8, 1855.  Photographs.—Messrs. Upton & Smiley, at the old Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. Upton, have recently introduced a photographic department to their establishment.  We have seen some specimens, colored in oil by Mr. Harris, which, for correctness of delineation and beauty of finish can’t be beat.  We say this without fear of contradiction, and any one who will take the trouble to visit the rooms, and examine the likeness of our venerable fellow citizen, Judge Clap, we are sure will agree with us.

The twelfth Advertisement ran from November 29, 1855 to April 17, 1856.  Daguerreotypes By Upton & Smiley, 45 Front Street 45.

Benjamin Franklin Upton is recorded as B. F. Upton in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry in Bath, Maine in 1855-1856. Craig also references unknown dates in Chicago, Illinois and St.Anthony, Minnesota.  


[1] American Photographic Patents The Daguerreotype & Wet Plate Era 1840 – 1880.

Upton & Smiley

1855-1856       45 Front Street, Bath, Maine.

Upton & Smiley (Benjamin Franklin Upton & Smiley) were recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Eastern Times (Bath, Maine).  The announcement appeared on November 8, 1855.  Photographs.—Messrs. Upton & Smiley, at the old Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. Upton, have recently introduced a photographic department to their establishment.  We have seen some specimens, colored in oil by Mr. Harris, which, for correctness of delineation and beauty of finish can’t be beat.  We say this without fear of contradiction, and any one who will take the trouble to visit the rooms, and examine the likeness of our venerable fellow citizen, Judge Clap, we are sure will agree with us.

The advertisement ran from November 29, 1855 to April 17, 1856.   Daguerreotypes By Upton & Smiley, 45 Front Street 45.

Benjamin Franklin Upton is recorded in other photographic directories but not in the partnership.  While Smiley is not recorded with a first name, this is possibly G. S. Smiley who was active in Brunswick, Maine in 1854.  For more information on Benjamin Franklin Upton see tomorrows post.  

Samuel S. Sullivan

1841-1842       Elliot House, Bath, Maine.

Samuel S. Sullivan was recorded in four announcements and two advertisements in the Lincoln Telegraph (Bath, Maine).  The first announcement appeared on September 16, 1841.  Lecture on the Daguerreotype.  We have received a letter from Mr. Purkitt, a gentleman well and favorably known to our citizens as an able and eloquent lecturer, of which the following is an extract, which we commend to the attention of our readers.

“Permit me my dear Clarke, en passant, to inform you that Mr. S. S. Sullivan, of Boston, is intending to visit your place for the purpose of delivering one or more lectures on the novel and exceedingly simple and beautiful discovery of Daguerre.  Mr. S.is well educated, a gentleman of fine talents, of vivid imagination and an excellent writer.  He will be listened to, I am persuaded, with great interest by the intelligent citizens of Bath.

The discovery of Daguerre is new and wonderful.  But strange to say, like many other discoveries, it has fallen into bad hands—into the hands of men who have never investigated, and therefore, cannot be supposed to understand either its principles or its details—men, who are as ignorant of Photography as a science, as a horse is of the principles of the Steam engine—in a word, it has fallen into the hands of men whose only qualification to teach it is, their—ignorance.  Though there be many who practice the Daguerreotype as an art, yet how few are competent to explain it!  Their knowledge appears to be all in their fingers—and alas! that it appears so badly there—no in their heads,—I am persuaded that your citizens need only exercise their own discernment and sound practical good sense to perceive the difference toto caelo—between truth and fiction, knowledge and ignorance, merit and pretension.

I believe I am correct in saying that there never has been but one gentleman who has lectured upon this subject in this country, and he, I think, was a foreigner.  The fact is, there are no books upon the subject; those, therefore who investigate it must have resources within themselves—must be able by a knowledge of details to establish general principles and to carry them out into practice.  It is for this reason that I think that the lectures of Mr. S. will command the attention and receive the approbation of gentlemen of science and all the lovers of the arts.  I hope the good citizens of Bath will give him a hearing, as I doubt not they will find their evening spent in an agreeable and instructive manner.

I understand he intends to lecture on Monday evening next, of which I presume due notice will be given.

With respect to his Daguerreotype Portraitures I can only saying the language of one of your contemporary journals, “they are wonderfully perfect, and surpass in correctness and beauty any that I have ever seen; they as far exceed those that have often times come under my notice, as an exquisitely finished steel engraving does one coarsely and clumsily executed on wood.  Indeed, I can conceive of nothing which can be added to make his pictures more life-like, unless it be the colors and tints of nature itself.  In this respect only, if at all, can a painted portrait be preferred. In all others, in accuracy and and minuteness of delineation, in the striking correctness of the features, in the delicate alternations of light and shade, the Daguerreotype Miniatures is as much superior to a painting, as the veritable productions of Nature are to the pencillings of the most accomplished artist.  These superiorities, together with the ease with which the likenesses are taken, (requiring a sitting of only a few seconds,) and the low price at which they can be obtained, must render them exceedingly popular.”  But your citizens will be able by an inspection of his specimens, to satisfy themselves of the wonderful results of this process.

I doubt not that many of your friends and neighbors will embrace the opportunity that will be presented to them of  ‘seizing the shadow ere the substance fades’—of snatching from oblivion some faces, that are worth saving from the corrosions of time.”  Yours truly. 

The second announcement appeared on September 23, 1841. The Daguerreotype.  The lecture on this new discovery, alluded to in our last, will take place on Monday evening next.  The reason it did not occur on Monday evening last was owing to the providential detention of the Lecturer, Mr. Sullivan, in Boston.  We trust our citizens will give him a full house.    

The third announcement appeared on October 14, 1841.  The Daguerreotype.  We have taken the trouble to examine several specimens of Daguerreotype Miniatures in Mr. Sullivan’s room at the Elliot House, with which we were much pleased.  The weather since he has been here has been exceedingly unfavorable, requiring considerable experimenting, in order to turn off perfect likenesses.  His specimens to day are very nearly perfect; and to-morrow he will probably be able to make them first rate.  Every body should call and examine this truly wonderful process.           

The fourth announcement appeared on October 21, 1841.  Particular attention is invited to the advertisement of Mr. Sullivan, who is now prepared to take first rate miniatures at the Elliot House.—Call on, Ladies and Gentlemen.

The first advertisement ran from October 21 to December 2, 1841.  Photography. Mr. Sullivan would inform the citizens of bath and its vicinity, that he has made arrangements to take Daguerreotype Miniatures. at his rooms in the Elliot House, where he will remain for a few days only; and will be happy to show specimens of this beautiful art to any who may favor him with a call.

The second advertisement ran from December 16, 1841 to March 10, 1842.  Photography—Once More.  The Subscriber has returned to Bath, and having availed himself of some recent improvements in the Daguerreotype Art, offers to take Miniatures, better, quicker and cheaper than has been done before; and without regard to weather.  His stay will be short.—Please give him a call, at the Eliot House. 

Samuel S. Sullivan is not recorded in other photographic directories.