Tag Archives: Pomeroy Ohio

Solomon Jackson Woolley

1851                Rooms at A. Stedman’s, Middleport, Ohio.

1851                Address and City Unknown, New York.

1852                Rooms at John Winkelblack’s, Pomeroy, Ohio.

1852                Rooms at the Odd Fellows’ Hall, Franklin, Louisiana.

1854-1855     Near the Market-House, Shreveport, Louisiana.       

Solomon Jackson Woolley was recorded in five advertisements and one announcement.  Three advertisements and the announcement appeared in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio), One advertisement each in The Planters’ Banner (Franklin, Louisiana) and Shreveport Weekly Times (Shreveport, Louisiana).  The first advertisement in the Meigs County Telegraph ran from April 17 to July 17, 1851.  Sir John Franklin—This brave Navigator has not yet been found, and his wife mourns because she has not his Daguerreotype likeness.  Alas! He put it off until it was to late.

Professor Woolly has taken rooms at A. Stedman’s, in Middleport, where he will remain but a few days, ready and happy to wait on those who may be so fortunate as to give him a call.

Professor Woolly has just received from New York the Electro Galvanico, which enables him to take better Pictures than has ever been taken in the West, and warranted to be inferior to none in the world, and cheaper than any before.

Come on, while every thing is ready.  A cloudy day is as good as any.

The second advertisement ran from December 16, 1851 to March 9, 1852 in Meigs County Telegraph.  Important Discovery in Daguerreotypes.—I would respectfully inform the citizens of Pomeroy that I am now receiving the late and wonderful discoveries in taking Daguerreotypes; and I will be in Pomeroy in December for the purpose of taking pictures.  S. J. Woolly.  New York.  December 7, 1851.

The third advertisement ran from January 20 to April 22, 1852.  Professor Woolly’s Daguerrean Gallery, At John Winkelblack’s, one door east of Lowery’s Tin Shop.  The enlightened citizens of this vicinity are respectfully invited to visit and examine the Pictures of the Gallery.

Pictures set in breastpins, lockets, plain and fancy cases, in strict accordance with the most approved mechanical and artistical improvements of the day.

The citizens of Pomeroy are wise: for they catch the image ere the substance flies; and if every citizen would be so wise, they would not mourn at the neglect.

My Pictures are warranted to please in every respect or no charge.

A cloudy day equally as good as a clear day.

I will stay in Pomeroy but a few days.  S. J. Woolly.   Pomeroy.

The announcement appeared on February 10, 1852.  Prof. Woolly, informs us that he intends remaining but a few days longer.—His Daguerrean Rooms are crowded daily, and his pictures give the highest satisfaction.  Woolly is an artist of more than ordinary merit.  Whilst others have been compelled to leave our town with scarcely anything to do, Woolly has always had a splendid run of custom.  He takes pictures, which for tone and finish rival those of the best artist of the country.  No one should fail to visit his rooms.

The fourth advertisement appeared in The Planters’ Banner (Franklin, Louisiana) on February 11, 1852.  Daguerrean Pictures, By The Improved Process.  Professor Woolley has just arrived in Franklin, and taken rooms in the Odd-Fellows’ Hall, where he will remain a few days, for the purpose of taking pictures.  Miniatures set in Breast-pins, lockets, or plain and fancy cases, in strict accordance with the late improvements of the art.

N. B. Ladies and gentlemen can rely on receiving polite attention.  Pictures warranted in the best style of the art, and perfect satisfaction given.  Charges moderate.

Pictures taken without regard to the weather.   Franklin, Dec. 11, 1852.

The fifth advertisement appeared in the Shreveport, Weekly Times (Shreveport, Louisiana) on  February 3, 1855.  Skylight Daguerreotypes.  Dear Reader:—I have just opened a fine Skylight Daguerrean room near the Market-house, where I have a large fine instrument, with a large stock of the best plates and cases.  I have recently made a discovery in the art.  Superior pictures, with full satisfaction or no charge.

Instructions given with apparatus and stock furnished.  Shreveport, Dec. 30th, 1854.

Solomon Jackson Woolley is recorded in other photographic directories, but is included here with additional and more specific information creating a more detailed timeline. 

V. C. or V. B. Tarbon

1855-1856       Front Street, Rooms over Mayhugh’s Grocery Store, Pomeroy, Ohio.

V. C. or V. B. Tarbon was recorded in one announcement and one advertisement in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  The announcement appeared on December 25, 1855.  V. B. Tarbon & Co., are prepared to take Daguerreotypes in good style.  Go and get your “ugly mug” taken.  His plates are strong. No danger of breaking them, unless you “put on airs.”

The advertisement ran from December 25, 1855 to March 4, 1856.  $100 For A Likeness!  “Hail holy Light!  Of Heaven first-born!!” 

How often we have heard it said, “I would give a hundred dollars, if I had a likeness of my deceased mother, &c.,”  Now one can be had, set in a good case, for only One Dollar, by visiting at any hour in the day, and in Any Weather, from 8 o’clock, A. M., till 4 P. M., at the Pomeroy daguerrean Gallery, front street, over Mayhugh’s Grocery.

The Subscribers keep on hand an assortment of Daguerreotype Stock and Apparatus, with which they will supply artist if desired.

Wanted!  A man to learn the business, to whom liberal inducements will be offered.  V. C. Tarbon & Co.

V. C. or V. B. Tarbon are not recorded in other photographic directories.

G. K. Smith

1857                At the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.

1858                Rooms over T. O. Crawford’s Store, Pomeroy, Ohio.

G. K. Smith was recorded in two advertisements in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  The first advertisement ran from August 25 to September 15, 1857. Ambrotypes.  G. K. Smith, Artist, has opened rooms on the “Floating Gallery,” now lying at Pomeroy, where he will remain two weeks, to enable all to get one of his unrivaled miniatures.  These pictures will be found far superior to any ever before taken at this place; they have a life-like tone, combined with a perfect Stereoscope relief that is rarely met with in Photographic Portraiture, and are pronounced by good judges, perfect gems of the Art.

Those in want of a perfect likeness, should improve this opportunity.

Perfect satisfaction guaranteed.

Rooms open from 8 A. M., to 5 P. M.  Hours for children 9 to 11.  August 18th ’57.

The second advertisement appeared on August 31, 1858.  Life-Size Photographs!  Plain, Or Colored, In Oil, Can Be Had At G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Girls.  Who would have a beautiful Likeness of themselves for a “Cousin,” or a friend, Should go to G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Mothers Who would have a life-like Picture of their little loves, should go between the hours of 11 A. M. and 2 P. M., to G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Ladies, Whether old or young, should remember that they can get better and cheaper pictures than has ever before been made in Pomeroy, at G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Young Men Who would be remembered in the days of their youth, should get a dozen Photographs to distribute among their friends.  They are the most durable and cheapest picture ever made.  They are only three dollars per dozen at G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Parents Should secure one of those imperishable Photographs, colored in oil, to leave to perpetuate their memory among their descendants, long years hence, when but for the Portrait that hangs on the wall, their once-familiar faces should have faded from the mind of their children and be forgotten.  You who have lost your parents and have no likeness left to remember them by, think what a treasure a perfect Likeness would be to you now, and get one while you may, at G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

Old Daguerreotypes.  Those who have old Daguerreotypes, half faded away, of some dear friend, now gone, can have a beautiful colored Photograph made from them, at G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store.

The Public Are respectfully invited, whether wanting pictures or not, to satisfy themselves that the above is not gas or humbug, by calling and examining specimens of work at G. K. Smith’s Gallery, Over T. O. Crawford’s Store. 

G. K. Smith is not listed in other photographic directories.

Moore & Gilbert

1854                At the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.                                                                                                    1854                At the Wharf, Middleport, Ohio.                                                                                        1854                At the Wharf, Cheshire, Ohio.

Moore & Gilbert were recorded in two announcements and one advertisement in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  The first announcement appeared on  July 25, 1854 Daguerreotypes.—Those who wish to preserve likenesses of themselves or friends, do not lack opportunity.  Lamartine is at our landing with his Yacht.  Handbills on the corners announce the fact that a couple of Itinerants have taken rooms over Branch’s store, and we are assured, by letter, that Messrs. Moore & Gilbert will be here next week with their Daguerrean Yacht.

Of the relative merits of the two first named we cannot speak—having never examined their work.  But if our friends are in no hurry, we can promise them something rich when Moore & Gilbert arrive.  During our recent absence, we visited them, and more recently they have sent us some specimens of their work, which may be seen by calling at our office.  We pronounce them good.  We think, therefore, our friends will lose nothing by waiting a few days.

The advertisement ran from August 8 to October 3, 1854.  Daguerrean Boat.  The subscribers take pleasure in announcing to the citizens of Middleport, that they have arrived with their Daguerreotype Boat, and are now ready to take pictures in such style, and at such prices as cannot fail to give satisfaction.  With our large Sky-Light, we are prepared to take pictures in cloudy as well as clear weather.  Moore & Gilbert.

The second announcement appeared on October 17, 1854.  Moore & Gilbert.—Our Citizens in the vicinity of Eight Mile Island who desire to have a life-like picture taken, can now have an opportunity of having it taken by Moore & Gilbert, at their Daguerrean Boat, lying at Cheshire.  During their stay here they took something like one hundred likenesses, a fact which goes to show that they give satisfaction to the public.  Any one visiting the boat can see specimens which do the proprietors credit as artist.  By the way, among the specimens we noticed an excellent likeness of Bro. Thomson, of the Pomeroy Telegraph, which seemed to attract the attention of young ladies generally.  Shouldn’t wonder if that is a sly way he has of advertising for a wife.  It was undoubtedly the picture of the best looking gentleman on the boat, until ours was placed along side of it.—Western Mess.

Moore & Gilbert do not appear in other photographic directories.  (Probably J. Charles Moore)

Lamartine & Sullivan

1851                on the Muskingum River                                                                                              1852                Boat near the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.                                                                                    1852                Boat at the Steamboat Landing, Gallipolis, Ohio.                                                    1854                Boat at the Wharf, Pomeroy, Ohio.                                                                                  1854-1855     Address Unknown, Portsmouth, Ohio.

Lamartine in the partnership of Lamartine & Sullivan were recorded in five announcements and one advertisements.  He was also recorded in one announcement and one advertisement by himself.  The first announcement appeared on June 17, 1852 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).   Daguerreotype Yacht.—Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan inform the public through our paper to-day where they can obtain daguerreotype likenesses of the very first quality for tone and finish.  We have examined their specimens, and have seldom seen them equaled.

The first advertisement ran from June 17 to July 22, 1852 in the same newspaper.  Daguerreotype Yacht!  Lamartine & Sullivan’s boat is now lying at Pomeroy, near the wharf boat, where they intend to remain a few days.  They solicit the patronage of the inhabitants.  Their instruments are of the best kind.  The arrangement for light is so adapted that they can take pictures in all kinds of weather.  Those who are desirous of having good Miniatures, can now have an opportunity of getting the best kind.  Family groups taken.  Infants can be taken in a few seconds.  Specimens can be seen at the Post Office and on the boat.

The second announcement appeared on August 19, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal (Gallipolis, Ohio).  Daguerreotyping.  Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan would respectfully announce to the Ladies and Gentlemen of the place and vicinity that their Yacht is now lying at the steamboat landing prepared to do all kinds of Daguerreotyping, from the smallest size fine rings up to the largest size fine frame and cases.  Family groups of any number neatly taken and put up in good style.  Please give us a call soon, our stay will be very short.  Pictures taken in all kinds of weather.

The third announcement appeared on August 26, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal (Gallipolis, Ohio).   Call at the yacht and have your likeness taken.  Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan are taking the best and cheapest likenesses ever taken in this place.

The fourth announcement appeared on September 2, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal (Gallipolis, Ohio).  Daguerreotypes.—Messrs. Lamartine & Sullivan, with their Yacht, designed remaining at our landing one week longer, in order to give all a chance of procuring a good likeness.  They certainly do up the thing in approved style.  We advise all to improve this opportunity of “securing the shadow ere the substance fades.”

The fifth announcement appeared on September 9, 1852 in the Gallipolis Journal (Gallipolis, Ohio).  The Daguerreotype Yacht will remain at the wharf a few days longer.  Our citizens have found out that Lamartine is some at the business and have so crowded him of late that he has been induced to remain longer than he had previously advertised for.  Don’t miss the chance.

The sixth announce appeared on July 25, 1854 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio).  Daguerreotypes.—Those who wish to preserve likenesses of themselves or friends, do not lack opportunity.  Lamartine is at our landing with his Yacht.  Handbills on the corners announce the fact that a couple of Itinerants have taken rooms over Branch’s store, and we are assured, by letter, that Messrs. Moore & Gilbert will be here next week with their Daguerrean Yacht.

Of the relative merits of the two first named we cannot speak—having never examined their work.  But if our friends are in no hurry, we can promise them something rich when Moore & Gilbert arrive.  During our recent absence, we visited them, and more recently they have sent us some specimens of their work, which may be seen by calling at our office.  We pronounce them good.  We think, therefore, our friends will lose nothing by waiting a few days.

The second advertisement ran from December 15, 1854 to July 13, 1855 in The Portsmouth Inquirer (Portsmouth, Ohio).  Portsmouth Daguerrean Gallery.  Mr. Lamartine would respectfully announce to the citizens of Portsmouth and vicinity that he has purchased the entire stock of E. Shewell, deceased, and will carry on the above business at the old stand.  Mr. L. intends making this a permanent location, and he would say to those wishing pictures, call in and look at our work, as we give satisfaction or no sale.

Pictures of all sizes taken.  Also, Lockets, Rings, Broaches and Pins taken at the shortest notice.  Open from 8 A. M., to 4 P. M.  Instruction in the art given, and apparatus furnished.  Dec. 8th.

Both Lamartine & Sullivan are recorded in other photographic directories as being active together in 1851 on the Muskingum River.  It appears that in 1852 and possibly later they traveled on the Ohio River.  By July 25, 1854 Sullivan is no longer part of the partnership and by December Lamartine has given up the traveling on the river for a studio on land.

Charles Carel

1857-1858       Court Street, Rooms over W. Stivers’ Store, Pomeroy, Ohio.                              1858                   Court Street, Rooms over Swallow’s Store, Pomeroy, Ohio.

Charles Carel is first recorded in an announcement and a advertisement on December 29, 1857 in the Meigs County Telegraph (Pomeroy, Ohio.)  Charles Carel is taking fine pictures for forty cents.

The advertisement ran from December 29, 1857 to February 29, 1858.  Cheap Pictures.  I Would respectfully inform the people of Pomeroy and vicinity that I am now taking Splendid and Life-Like Ambrotypes and Melainotypes at Forty Cents.  Also a large assortment of Cases, to suit any taste, and at the most moderate prices.  Room over W. Stivers’ Store.  Entrance on Court street, next door below O. Branch’s store.  Call soon as I warrant my pictures not to fade.  Pictures taken in cloudy as well as clear weather.

In the same newspaper again an announcement followed by an advertisement appeared on  February 16, 1858.  Charles Carel, Daguerrean artist gives notice of his intention to leave Pomeroy, and those who fail to procure the advantages of his low prices for pictures, can but blame themselves.

The advertisement ran from February 16 to March 23, 1858.  “Pitch In.”  Pictures Cheaper Than Ever.  I take this method of informing the public that hereafter I will take splendid and life-like Pictures Cheaper Than Ever.  Also, to call soon, as I can stay in this place but a short time longer.  I will take $1.50 Pictures for $1.25; $1.25 do. for $1; 75 cent do. for 60 cents, and all others in proportion.

Rooms over W. Stivers’ Store.  Entrance on Court street, next door below O. Branch’s store.  Please call soon, as it is the Last chance you will have of getting Splendid Pictures at such low prices.  I warrant my pictures not to fade in any climate.

N. B.—Instruction given in every branch of the art. Price $30. Apply soon.

The next advertisement ran from April 6, 1858 to June 8, 1858.  Carel Still About.  I am Still In Pomeroy, And Shall remain till further notice.  Pictures from 40 cts. to Five Dollars, Warranted not to fade.  A splendid Stock of material on hand.  Call soon and get one of my durable and, if desired, Cheap Pictures.

Rooms over W. Stivers’ Store.  Entrance on Court street, next door below O. Branch’s store.

N. B.—Instruction given in every branch of the art. Price $30. Apply soon.

The following announcement appeared on August 10, 1858 followed by and advertisement.  Carel, the “countenance taker,” has something to say this week, and he says it right out.  Don’t overlook the “document.”  See his card in another column.  When carel is beat in his line, we venture to say he will “draw the drapery of his couch around him”—and quit.

The Advertisement ran from August 10 to 24, 1858.  Read This, Everybody!  Whereas, The proprietor of a “one horse” Picture Boat has taken pains to tell people that my 50 cent Pictures will fade.  I would inform the public that it is Utterly False, as can be proven by Hundreds of my pictures which I have taken during my stay here, of which Not One has ever faded In The Least.

Recollect that I am stationed here permanently, and am Accountable for Every Picture I turn out.  I Warrant my 50 cent pictures and all others to Stand in any climate; if not, Return Them And You Can Have Your Money!  I can always be found at my Gallery, over Swallow’s Store, on Court Street, where I will take Pictures for 50 cents, which I will warrant Never to fade, and which are better and more life-like than those which the “Fellow” referred to above charges  One Dollar for.  I have just received a fine stock of Cases and Material of all kinds, which I will dispose of Cheaper than any floating “gas” concern at or within forty miles of Pomeroy.  Recollect, I Pledge myself to take Better, More Durable and Cheaper Pictures than Any floating concern on the River.  I have settled Permanently in Pomeroy, and if any of my pictures fade, I will always be found ready to refund the money.             Chas. Carel.

On August 24, 1858 J. C. Moore responses to Carel’s advertisement.  For the Telegraph.  Messrs. Editors:  My attention has been called to an advertisement which appeared in your last week’s issue, in which a contemptible scamp signing himself “Chas. Carel,” made an attack upon me and my business, in terms that would have done credit to the vilest blackguard in the land, the whole thing being no more nor less than a perfect tissue of falsehood and slander.

Among other things, he informs the public that he can take “better pictures for 50 cents than we do for one dollar.”  Now, Mr. Editor, in order to test the sincerity of the above piece of hombast, we make the above mentioned “Charles Carel.” the following proposition, which we dare him to accept.  We will deposit 50 or $100, in the hands of any responsible citizen of Pomeroy, he to deposit a like amount with the same.  He can take any citizen he may choose, and take two, four, or six impressions—do his best.  We take the same person and take one-half the number he does, and send the pictures to Cincinnati to three Artist.  He to select one, we another and they a third, and the “fellow” who makes the best picture takes the whole amount of money so deposited.  As the aforesaid “Chas.” Is of a sporting turn, we may expect to have some fun when he accepts the above proposition.  In conclusion I will say to the public that I am now taking very much finer pictures than have ever been taken in Pomeroy, as I do not work in a half-house side light room, but am provided with the best arranged light ever on the Ohio River.  Remember we take no 25 cent shadows, but warrant every pictures for all time.

N. B. The public are respectfully invited to call on board and examine our specimens, and compare them with some of “Carel’s,” which we have taken over.     J. C. Moore, Floating Artist.

On October 26, 1858 the following notice appears.  Mr. E. Feiger has bought out the Daguerrean Gallery in Swallow’s building, on Court street, and proposes taking pictures of all kinds as cheap and good as has before been taken in this place.  See advertisement.

Charles Carel is not listed in other photographic directories during the scope of the project dates.  He possibly is listed in Ohio Photographers, 1839-1900.  Diane list a Carel (no first name) in Gallipolis in 1860-1865, and a Charles Carel in Gallipolis from 1866-1884.  Pomeroy is about twenty miles from Gallipolis.