Tag Archives: Indianapolis Indiana

Charles W. Purcell

1849-1850       128 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]                                                        1851                   Rooms in Sharpe & Yandee’s Building, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Charles W. Purcell was mentioned in an announcement that appeared on October 9, 1851 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  “Here Life Seems Speaking From A Hundred Frames.”—The new and beautiful Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. S. Rea are completed, and are now open for the reception of visitors.  The quality of Mr. Rea’s pictures has always been greatly admired, but since he has introduced the improvement of his new sky-light, and side-lights, he is enabled to give a much better finish to Daguerreotypes, and to produce a more perfect picture than heretofore.  By his new arrangement of light, the difficulty heretofore experienced in taking the likenesses of children, aged persons, and those with light-colored or weak eyes, has been removed, and an impression is taken on the plate in a very short space of time.  We have seen several of his pictures taken by the new light, and for beautiful gradation of light and shade, clearness in the image, and the softness of tone, we have never seen them equaled.

The Metropolitan Gallery consists of two large rooms, in Sharpe & Yandee’s building.  One is used for operating, and the other as the gallery and reception room.  The latter is tastefully and splendidly furnished, the pictures being arranged on each side of the room, and also in the frame-work of a circular moveable case, placed on a pedestal in the centre of the room.  His beautiful assortment of fine gold lockets and breastpins for miniatures, occupy a portion of this case.

Mr. Rea has secured the services of Mr. Charles W. Purcell, of Baltimore, an experienced operator, and he pledges himself that not a picture shall leave his establishment that does not give entire satisfaction.

Charles W. Purcell is recorded in other photographic directories but the above information helps to clarify his timeline.

[1] Baltimore activity dates and address from Directory of Maryland Photographers 1939-1900, p. 43.  By Ross J. Kelbaugh..

J. F.Parker

1850                Address Unknown, Indianapolis, Indiana.

J. F. Parker was recorded in one advertisement in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana) on July 25, 1850.  Miniatures.—J. F. Parker would most respectfully inform the citizens of Indianapolis, that he has taken and refitted the room formerly occupied by W. T. Goble, for the purpose of taking Daguerreotype Miniatures.  By the aid of new chemical agents, he is enabled to take likenesses to that perfection which, in point of delineation, boldness, and unerring truthfulness the art has attained.  Pictures taken in any weather, rain or shine, and all prices, according to size and quality of cases.  Miniatures of the deceased taken with accuracy.  July 20.

J.  F. Parker is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Munsell & McNaught

1848                Norris’s Building, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Munsell & McNaught were recorded in an announcement that appeared on December 16, 1848 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  Daguerreotype Likenesses.—A rare opportunity is now offered to those who desire to obtain correct likenesses by the daguerreotype process.

First in the list of operators at present in this city, are our friends Munsell & McNaught.  As a scientific chemist, Dr. Munsell has few superiors any where, and as a practical operator in photographic miniatures, large and small, McNaught has no superior in this country.  We use this expression deliberately, and trial will prove its truth.  We visited “Plumbe’s Daguerrean Gallery,” and various other similar rooms, on a late journey to the east, and among the hundreds of specimens which we saw, we did not see one superior, if indeed any equal, to those which can be exhibited by Mr. McNaught.  We therefore feel it due to unpretending but real merit, to recommend our friends to call at the rooms of the gentlemen her indicated, and see for themselves; and we urge them to do so immediately, as we understand that one of them (Mr. McN.) will soon leave town.  It is a common error that one man can make these pictures as well as another; but this is a very great mistake.  To make good ones, requires much practical knowledge, and some good taste; and these qualities are united in these gentlemen to an eminent degree.  Let our friends at once call at the office of Dr. Munsell, in Norris’s building, and see for themselves.

Secondly: we have an artist in the person of Mr. Foster, room opposite Temperance Hall, who has been but a few days in the city.  He exhibits some excellent specimens, and promises to give satisfaction to all who may call his services into requisition.  We have no doubt of his ability to redeem all the promises he may make, and we mean to try his skill in a day or two, upon our handsome phiz.

Munsell & McNaught are not recorded in other photographic directories as being active in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Mr. Macey

1845                Rooms over the Dayton Hat and Shoe Store, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Mr. Macey was recorded in an announcement in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana) on December 4, 1845.  Daguerrian Miniatures.  There are three persons engaged at present in this city, in taking photographic miniatures; and all of them, we believe, are excellent artists.  We have already spoken of Mr. Kever.  We now desire to commend to the public attention Mr. Macey, whose room is over the Dayton Hat and Shoe Store.  Mr. M. deserves patronage on several accounts.  In the first place, he is a first rate artist, and secondly, he is unfortunate by reason of an accident, which has almost entirely deprived him of the use of an arm.  His gentlemanly demeanor is sure to win the approbation of all with whom he may become acquainted.  We hope the ladies as well as gentlemen, will give him a call.

Mr. Macey is not recorded in other photographic directories.

R. L. Lukens

1857                19 East Washington Street, over Harrison’s Bank, Indianapolis, Indiana.

R. L. Lukens appeared in an advertisement that appeared on December 25, 1857 Indiana American (Brookville, Indiana). R. L. Lukens’ Likeness Gallery, No. 19 E. Washington St., over Harrison’s Bank, Indianapolis, Where he is prepared to take Ambrotypes and Melainotypes In good Morocco Cases, for the small sum of 50 Cents! Every variety of Fancy Cases at reasonable prices.  Ladies and Gentlemen, call on Mr. Lukens, and he will give you a life likeness of yourself, or no charge.  Pictures taken in Lockets and Breastpins. Peculiar [lities] for taking likenesses of children.  Full instructions given in the art on reasonable terms.  nov-13.

R. L. Lukens does not appear in other photographic directories. Please note the date at the end of the advertisement (Nov. 13).  No newspapers were available to be reviewed between October 30 and December 18, 1857.

Mr. Kever

1845                Room over Ferguson’s Watch Store, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Mr. Kever was recorded in three announcements in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  The first announcement appeared on November 12, 1845.  Daguerreotyping.  We are happy to announce that Mr. Kever, an excellent artist, has taken the room over Ferguson’s Watch Store, where he is prepared to furnish excellent Daguerreotype miniatures.  We have examined a number of his execution, and have seldom, if ever, seen them surpassed.  We hope he will receive a liberal patronage.

The second announcement appeared on November 13, 1845.  Daguerreotyping.  We are happy to announce that Mr. Kever, an excellent artist, has taken the room over Ferguson’s Watch Store, where he is prepared to furnish excellent Daguerreotype miniatures.  We have examined a number of his execution, and have seldom, if ever, seen them surpassed.  We hope he will receive a liberal patronage. 

The third announcement appeared on December 4, 1845.  Daguerrian Miniatures.  There are three persons engaged at present in this city, in taking photographic miniatures; and all of them, we believe, are excellent artists.  We have already spoken of Mr. Kever.  We now desire to commend to the public attention Mr. Macey, whose room is over the Dayton Hat and Shoe Store.  Mr. M. deserves patronage on several accounts.  In the first place, he is a first rate artist, and secondly, he is unfortunate by reason of an accident, which has almost entirely deprived him of the use of an arm.  His gentlemanly demeanor is sure to win the approbation of all with whom he may become acquainted.  We hope the ladies as well as gentlemen, will give him a call.

Mr. Kever, and Mr. Macey are not recorded in other photographic directories.

F. M. Foster

1848                 Room opposite Temperance Hall, Indianapolis, Indiana.

F. M. Foster was recorded in an advertisement and was mentioned in an article. The advertisement ran from December 2 to 30, 1848 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana). F. M. Foster’s Daguerrean Rooms, Opposite Temperance Hall, Indianapolis.  Ladies and Gentlemen are invited to call and examine specimens.  A perfect likeness of a friend is the most acceptable holiday present that can be given or received.  Miniatures taken in cloudy as well as clear weather.  Instructions in the art carefully and faithfully given.  Apparatus, Plates, Cases, Chemicals, &c., furnished to order.

The article was recorded on December 16, 1848 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  Daguerreotype Likenesses.—A rare opportunity is now offered to those who desire to obtain correct likenesses by the daguerreotype process.

First in the list of operators at present in this city, are our friends Munsell & McNaught.  As a scientific chemist, Dr. Munsell has few superiors any where, and as a practical operator in photographic miniatures, large and small, McNaught has no superior in this country.  We use this expression deliberately, and trial will prove its truth.  We visited “Plumbe’s Daguerrean Gallery,” and various other similar rooms, on a late journey to the east, and among the hundreds of specimens which we saw, we did not see one superior, if indeed any equal, to those which can be exhibited by Mr. McNaught.  We therefore feel it due to unpretending but real merit, to recommend our friends to call at the rooms of the gentlemen her indicated, and see for themselves; and we urge them to do so immediately, as we understand that one of them (Mr. McN.) will soon leave town.  It is a common error that one man can make these pictures as well as another; but this is a very great mistake.  To make good ones, requires much practical knowledge, and some good taste; and these qualities are united in these gentlemen to an eminent degree.  Let our friends at once call at the office of Dr. Munsell, in Norris’s building, and see for themselves.

Secondly: we have an artist in the person of Mr. Foster, room opposite Temperance Hall, who has been but a few days in the city.  He exhibits some excellent specimens, and promises to give satisfaction to all who may call his services into requisition.  We have no doubt of his ability to redeem all the promises he may make, and we mean to try his skill in a day or two, upon our handsome phiz.