Tag Archives: Sampson Rea

Charles W. Purcell

1849-1850       128 Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland.[1]                                                        1851                   Rooms in Sharpe & Yandee’s Building, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Charles W. Purcell was mentioned in an announcement that appeared on October 9, 1851 in the Indiana State Sentinel (Indianapolis, Indiana).  “Here Life Seems Speaking From A Hundred Frames.”—The new and beautiful Daguerreotype Rooms of Mr. S. Rea are completed, and are now open for the reception of visitors.  The quality of Mr. Rea’s pictures has always been greatly admired, but since he has introduced the improvement of his new sky-light, and side-lights, he is enabled to give a much better finish to Daguerreotypes, and to produce a more perfect picture than heretofore.  By his new arrangement of light, the difficulty heretofore experienced in taking the likenesses of children, aged persons, and those with light-colored or weak eyes, has been removed, and an impression is taken on the plate in a very short space of time.  We have seen several of his pictures taken by the new light, and for beautiful gradation of light and shade, clearness in the image, and the softness of tone, we have never seen them equaled.

The Metropolitan Gallery consists of two large rooms, in Sharpe & Yandee’s building.  One is used for operating, and the other as the gallery and reception room.  The latter is tastefully and splendidly furnished, the pictures being arranged on each side of the room, and also in the frame-work of a circular moveable case, placed on a pedestal in the centre of the room.  His beautiful assortment of fine gold lockets and breastpins for miniatures, occupy a portion of this case.

Mr. Rea has secured the services of Mr. Charles W. Purcell, of Baltimore, an experienced operator, and he pledges himself that not a picture shall leave his establishment that does not give entire satisfaction.

Charles W. Purcell is recorded in other photographic directories but the above information helps to clarify his timeline.

[1] Baltimore activity dates and address from Directory of Maryland Photographers 1939-1900, p. 43.  By Ross J. Kelbaugh..