Tag Archives: Nantucket Massachusetts

Mayo G. Smith

1841                2 Hussey’s Block, Corner Main and Union Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts

1842                R. Pollard’s Corner of Chestnut and Centre Streets., Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Mayo G. Smith was recorded in three announcements and three advertisements in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  The first announcement appeared on September 8, 1841. 

Dentistry.  Drs. Smith and Ward, who this morning announced the opening of their office in this town, come hither, we can assure the public, with the highest testimonials in reference to character and ability…

We have also been favored with a view of several admirable specimens of Daguerreotype portraiture, in which wonderful art Dr. Smith received instructions from Prof. Morse of the N. Y. University.  If he should find leisure, by this most indisputably accurate process, to immortalize the lineaments of certain of our friends and neighbors, we hope he and they may be induced to seize the present opportunity for snatching from oblivion some faces, that are worth saving from the corrosion of time.

The second announcement appeared on September 15, 1841.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.  All who have eyes, noses, and mouths worth having in remembrance of their children and friends should be reminded, that an excellent opportunity is afforded for a few days longer, of having said lineaments faithfully copied and neatly encased from injury in a shape and size fit for transmission to posterity, and which may endure long after the breathing original shall cease to be.  This method of obtaining likenesses of course exceeds every other in correctness, for nature is the limner and she makes no mistake.  Persons about to leave their homes, should avail themselves of so desirable a chance of leaving with their friends, a keepsake that shall be of priceless value,—or of tacking with them the loved “features of a face” which though “graven on the feeling heart,” may never again in substance, salute their vision.  “young men and maidens, old men and children,” sit still just fifteen seconds and ye are painted in a style that no artist’s pencil can equal.  We refer our readers to the advertisement of Dr. Mayo G. Smith, on our third page.

The first advertisement ran from September 15, 1841 to September 22, 1841.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.   “Secure the shadow ere the substance falls.” 

The subscriber having been initiated in the mysteries of Photography, by Prof. Morse of the N. York University, respectfully informs the inhabitants of this place that he is ready to take likenesses, by this interesting process, at the office of Smith & Ward, 2 Hussey’s Block, corner main and Union street. Mayo G. Smith                                                          

The announcement appeared on September 22, 1841.  The Daguerreotype.  We annex an article from the Boston Transcript of the 10th inst. in  relation to this very interesting and wonderful art.  Many persons in this town who have applied to Dr. Smith for the purpose of being “born again” assured us they would not part with the likeness obtained by this process, on any consideration, so correctly are they delineated.  Indeed, we have had our own phiz transferred with an accuracy and finish truly astonishing.  Individuals can be supplied with exact and beautiful portraits in a few seconds, at the room of Smith & Ward, corner of Main and Union streets, neatly enclosed in morocco cases, which will give entire satisfaction.

Thanks to the praiseworthy liberality of the French government, the benefits of this wonderful discovery are confined within no narrow limits, now that the secret has been fairly bought, and handsomely paid for, the world at large seem resolved to make the most of it.  Go where we will, in city or country, we find a “Photographic Institution” in full operation; and the mantel piece or the centre table of every person of taste is almost sure to contain, among its other ornaments, the counterfeit presentment of the human face divine, traced by the unerring finger of nature herself.  It is now, we think, not quite two years since its first discovery, and it is quite surprising to see with what rapidity this invention has made its way throughout the length and breadth of the land.

We have always been great admires of fidelity in a portrait.  We want no fancy sketches of ourself or friends.  Yet painters are almost always sure, though perhaps unintentionally, to give us a face rather as they conceive it should be, than as it really is.  Copley’s freedom from this habit is one of the greatest merits of his masterly pictures.  He painted you a face and figure just as he found them, and that, too, with a boldness and depth of shadow, absolutely unequalled in our day.  Such pictures are worth having and keeping.  The photographic drawings, it is true, are far from being substitutes for the triumphs of artistical skill in limning, and, above all in color, but they are yet invaluable for their perfect truth.  We are sure, when we sit down before the wonder working apparatus, of being mirrored exactly as we are, and this alone is enough to reconcile us, in this case, to the absence of every thing else which we value in a portrait.  Where we are so fortunate, indeed, as to possess both, we have nothing farther to ask.

It was stated, a short time since, that M. Daguerre has been constantly engaged in perfecting his discovery, and that a great improvement in the length of time requisite for the process has been the result of his labors.  We have no doubt that still farther improvements will yet be made; and you can only express the hope that so indefatigable and scientific a man may live long to enlighten and benefit mankind.

By the way, speaking of Photography, we will subjoin, for the amusement of those of our readers who have been Daguerreotyped, a graphic sketch of the new style of portrait printing, and of its effect upon the sitter, extracted from a humorous and witty contribution to the Littell’s Museum, on Photographic Phenomena:—

Apollo, whom Drummond of Hawthornden styled

“Apelles of Flowers”

Now Mixes his showers

Of sunshine, with colors by clouds undefilled;

Apelles indeed to men, women, and child,

His agent on earth, when your attitude’s right,

Your collar adjusted, your locks in their place,

Just seizes one moment of favoring light,

And utters three sentences—“Now its begun”—

“It’s going on now, sir.”—and “now it is done;”

And lo!  As I live, there’s that cut of your face

On a silvery plate

Unnering as fate.

Worked off in celestial and strange mezzotint,

A little resembling an elderly print.

“Well, I never!”  all cry; “It is cruelly like you!”

But Truth is unpleasant

To prince and to peasant.

You recollect Lawrence, and think of the graces

That Chalon and Company give to their faces:

The face you have worn fifty years doesn’t Strike you!

The Criticisms of the Sitters.

“Can this be me!  Do look, Mamma!”

Poor June begins to whimper,

“I have a smile, ‘tis true;—but pa!

This gives me quite a simper.”

Says Tibb, whose plays are worse than bad,

“It Makes my forehead flat;”

And being classical, he’ll ad!,

“I’m blow’d if I like that.”

Courtly, all candor, own his portrait true;

“Oh, yes, it’s like; yes, very; it will do.

Extremely like me—every feature—but

That plain pag-nose; now mine’s the Grecian cut!”

Her grace surveys her face with drooping lid;

Prefers the portrait with Sir Thomas did;

Owns that o’er this some traits of truth are sprinkled;

But view the brow with anger—“Why it’s wrinkled!”

“Like me!” cries Sir Turtle: “I’ll lay two to one

It would only be guess’d at by my foes;

No, no, it is plain there are spots in the sun,

Which accounts for those spots on my nose.”

“A likeness!”  Cries Crosslook, the lawyer, and sneers;

“Yes the wig, throat, and forehead I spy,

And the mouth, chin, and cheeks, and the nose, and the ears,

But it gives me a cast in the eyes!”

The second advertisement ran from September 25, 1841 to November 24, 1841.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.   “Secure the shadow ere the substance falls.” 

The subscriber having been initiated in the mysteries of Photography, by Prof. Morse of the N. York University, respectfully informs the inhabitants of this place that he is ready to take likenesses, by this interesting process, at the office of Smith & Ward, 2 Hussey’s Block, corner main and Union street.

Likenesses, enclosed in neat morocco cases, will be furnished for from $3 to $5, Groups in proportion.  Mayo G. Smith.          S15

The third advertisement ran from November 5 to November 12, 1842.  Teeth.  M. G. Smith having returned to Nantucket, informs his friends and the public generally, that he is prepared to perform all operations in Dentistry particularly the medical and surgical treatment of alcerations, diseases of the gums and all alveolar complaints…

M. G. S. has also a Daguerreotype Apparatus by which he can take permanent and perfect likenesses…

…Office at R. Pollard’s corner of Chestnut and Centre Sts.

Mayo G. Smith is not recorded in other photographic directories.

J. B. Smith

1846                Orange & Main Streets, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

J. B. Smith was recorded in one advertisement that appeared on April 22,1846 in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotypes.  J. B. Smith respectfully invites the citizens of Nantucket to call at his rooms, corner of Orange and Main Streets, and examine specimens of Daguerreotype Miniatures produced by the highly improved German Camera.  The capacities of this instrument are excelled by no other Camera now in this country, and all persons desirous of obtaining a life like miniature of themselves, are invited to sit for a picture.  No charge will be made unless the likeness prove perfectly satisfactory.  Likenesses taken in cloudy or even stormy weather equally good.

Terms—For extra sizes set in frames, cases, or lockets, from $2, to $10.  a15.

J.B. Smith is not listed in other photographic directories as being active in Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Maxham & Gorham

1848                41 Orange Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Maxham & Gorham were recorded in an announcement on July 15, 1848 in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Those wishing Likenesses of themselves or friends, can procure them, of any shade or color desired, at Maxham & Gorham’s.  41 Orange Street.

Maxham & Gorham are not recorded in other photographic directories.

G. W. J. Hawes

1845                Over the Post Office, Nantucket, Massachusetts.                                                                1845                105 Union Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts.                                                                1846                Over Mr. Orison Adam’s store, Nantucket, Massachusetts.                                          1847                Over Frederick Gardner & Co store, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

G. W. J. Hawes appeared in three advertisements and one announcement in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts). The first advertisement was recorded on May 12, 1845.

Daguerreotype Miniatures.  G. W. Hawes has taken Rooms over the Post Office; where he will remain a few days, for the purpose of taking likenesses—colored, or not, as persons may prefer.  Charge for likeness and the setting, $2,50.

Mr. H. having had long experience in the business, is prepared to give the most fastidious perfect satisfaction, or no sale.

Miniature settings, such as gold, plated, and washed lockets, always on hand.  He would also give notice that he is permanently located at 105 Union street, New Bedford, where he or his partner will be happy to wait upon their patrons in the best style.  May 5.

The announcement appeared on July 26, 1845. Miniatures By Daguerreotype.  G. W. Hawes has returned to the Island and taken rooms over the old Post Office, where he will remain a few days—Persons can have a likenesses taken, with or without coloring as they may prefer, and warranted to suit them, or they are not expected to take them.  Price $2,50.  A variety of washed, plated, and gold Lockets always on hand. 

The second advertisement appeared on April 22, 1846 and ran from April 22 to July 1, 1846. Miniatures.  G. W. J. Hawes Has returned to the Island again and taken rooms over Mr. Orison Adam’s store and is now prepared to wait on any who may call.  Having procured the new and improved apparatus, he is prepared to take Miniatures in the best style, colored if they choose, and set them in a good case, for $1,50.  Pictures set in Lockets for $3,25, and $3,50.  A great variety of washed, plated, and gold Lockets, always on hand.  a10.

The third advertisement appeared on May 14, 1847.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  G. W. J. Hawes respectfully inform the inhabitants of Nantucket, that he has taken rooms over Frederick Gardner & Co.’s store.  Persons wishing Miniatures can now procure them in style and finish unsurpassed by any.  Long practice enables him to take Pictures of any style or coloring desired.

Pictures taken in cloudy weather as well as in fair.  Also, children of any age, and family groups of four or eight persons taken on one plate.  Lockets and Miniature Settings always on hand.

Those visiting New Bedford, will find us permanently located at Nos. 1 and 3, Liberty Hall, corner of Purchase and William streets.  m19.  G. W. J. Hawes & Co.

G. W. J. Hawes is not recorded in other photographic directories. A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900 does list  Charles E. Hawes in 1845 in New Bedford at 105 Union Street but G. W. J. does not appear in the city directory.

Gorham

1848                41 Orange Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Gorham was recorded as part of the partnership of Maxham & Gorham in an announcement on  July 15, 1848 in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Those wishing Likenesses of themselves or friends, can procure them, of any shade or color desired, at Maxham & Gorham’s.  41 Orange Street.

Gorham is not recorded in Directory of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900 or other photographic directories.  It is possible that Maxham is Benjamin D. who was active in 1848 in Dover, New Hampshire. And latter in Worcester, Massachusetts, but that is only speculation on my part no proof as be found to substantiate this claim.

E. Goddard

1845                43 Orange Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

E. Goddard was recorded in an advertisement that ran from September 17 to 24, 1845 in

Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Mr. E. Goddard would inform the citizens of Nantucket, that he is prepared to execute Miniature Likenesses, at his rooms on Orange st., No. 43.  Ladies and Gentlemen are respectfully invited to call and examine specimens—Patronage respectfully solicited.

Dental Surgery performed by Doct. Adams, Practical Dentist, at the Daguerreotype Rooms all operations warranted.

E. Goddard is not recorded in A Directory of Massachusetts Photographers 1839-1900. Craig’s Daguerreian Register does list an Emerson J. Goddard in Cumberland and Woonsocket, Rhode Island starting in 1849  It is possible that they are the same person.

Mr. Dewey

1842                Rooms at Mrs. Barney’s, Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Mr. Dewey is recorded in two advertisements that ran in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts).  The first advertisement ran on April 23, 1842.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  It will be seen by reference to our advertising columns that Mr. Dewey proposes to remain a few days with us for the purpose of taking miniatures by the striking and wonderful Daguerreotype process.  We have been permitted to examine some of Mr. D.’s specimens and do not hesitate to pronounce them, for their clearness, vividness and accuracy by far the best that we have ever seen.  We recommend those of our readers who wish for perfect fac-similies of their own physiognomies or those of their friends to give him a call.

The second advertisement ran on April 30, 1842.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Mr. Dewey is very successful in taking these “counterfeit presentments,” and has, we believe, given entire satisfaction to all who have called his skill in requisition.  His rooms are at Mrs. Barney’s.

Mr. Dewey is not recorded in other photographic directories.

H. S. Chase

1843                86½ Main Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts

H. S. Chase was recorded in three announcements and three advertisements in the Nantucket Inquirer (Nantucket, Massachusetts.) The first announcement appeared on July 22, 1843. Daguerreotype Miniatures.  We would call attention to the advertisement of Mr. H. S. Chase, who proposes to remain in town a few days for the purpose of taking miniatures by the striking and wonderful Daguerreotype process.  We have been permitted to examine some of Mr. C.’s specimens, which were excellent, and we believe that he has given entire satisfaction to all who have called his skill in requisition.  We recommend those of our readers who wish perfect fac-similes of their own physiognomies or those of their friends, to give him a call.  His rooms are at 86½ Main street, upstairs. 

The second announcement appeared on August 5, 1843.  Daguerreotype Miniatures.  Mr. Chase is very successful in taking these “counterfeit presentments,” and will remain in town a few days longer for that purpose.  His rooms are at 86½ Main street, upstairs.  We would advise all who wish a first-rate likeness of themselves or their friends, to improve this opportunity.  Give him a call.

The first advertisement appeared on August 19 and ran until August 26, 1843.  Miniatures Taken By The Daguerreotype.  Mr. H. S. Chase would respectfully inform the citizens of Nantucket, that he has taken rooms at 86½ Main street, upstairs where he will be happy to receive those who wish to examine specimens in his beautiful art.  Mr. H. S. C. flatters himself that his pictures are unsurpassed by any in New England, and requests that no one will form an opinion of them before examining his specimens.

Miniatures will be taken at your own mansions, if desired.  Those who wish a perfect likeness of themselves, or friends, and a beautiful picture, would do well to call soon, as his stay in town will be short.  Entire satisfaction given or no charges.

Price, in the best Daguerreotype Cases, $4.  Two persons in one picture, $6.

Those who have Miniatures taken by other operators, with which they are dissatisfied, can have them taken over at a reduced price.                                                                       Jy 12.

On August 26, 1843 the second advertisement appeared and ran until September 9, 1843.  Price Reduced From $4 to Only $2.50!!!

Photographic Miniatures Taken at 86½ Main Street, Only One Week Longer.  In consequence of having some stock on hand, which he wishes to dispose of before leaving the Island, Mr. Chase has concluded to reduce the price of his pictures, to about the cost of the materials, for the short time which he will remain on the island.  Those who wish exact likenesses of themselves, will do well to embrace the present rare opportunity.  Every picture warranted.

Remember Only one week longer!  Single pictures, $2.50, former price $4; two persons in one picture, $3.50, former price $6.

The third advertisement appeared on September 23 and ran until October 4, 1843.  The Last Chance.  The Daguerreotype Rooms will positively Close This Week.

By a new process, Mr. Chase has succeeded in giving his pictures a natural flesh color; which renders them far superior to any heretofore produced.

Specimens of this kind may be seen at the rooms.  Price $2,50 in cases or frames, hours of operating from 8 to 3 o’clock.

The third announcement appeared on October 28, 1843.  Daguerreotype Likenesses.  It is well known to our readers that for some months past Mr. Chase has been very successful in taking correct likenesses by the Daguerreotype process.  Mr. C.  having imperative engagements elsewhere, disposed of his apparatus to Mr. George F. Barney, a citizen of this town and a genuine Nantucketer.  Mr. Barney by diligent and close application, obtained of his predecessor all the information necessary to obtain correct likenesses, and we are glad to say that he has, thus far, been well encouraged, and given entire satisfaction to those who have patronized him.  We have examined many of the likenesses taken by Mr. B., and we consider them equal, in every respect, to any that we have ever seen.  Call and give him a trial; if he does not give perfect satisfaction, you are not obliged to take the picture.  Encourage and cherish “Home Industry,” is sound policy.—See advertisement.

H. S. Chase does not appear in other photographic directories, nor does George F. Barney.