Tag Archives: J. W. McCormac

J. W. McCormac

1856-1858       West side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, Clarksville,                                     Tennessee.                                                                                                                                1857                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                                  1858                   Address Unknown, Hopkinsville, [Kentucky.]                                                              1857-1858       Gallery over the Northern Bank, Clarksville, Tennessee.

J. W. McCormac was recorded in six advertisements and ten announcements. The first advertisement ran from January 9 to November 18, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec. 5, ’56). Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50.             Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The first announcement appeared in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee)  on April 17, 1857.  The improvement and advancements that have been made, of late years, in the arts of Photographing and Daguerreotyping, are really astonishing, and they both seem now, to have reached perfection.  We have been led to this conclusion by seeing, within the past few days, some of the work in this art, by our friend, M’Cormac, whose gallery is over the late Democratic Reading Room—next door to the Northern Bank.  We do not hesitate to pronounce his work superior to any we have ever before seen.  He fully understands his business, and spares no pains nor expense to avail himself of every improvement in the art; and the result is that, for distinctness of impression, for tone, relief, attitude, naturalness, and high finish, his work is unsurpassed.  As we said before, we have lately examined some of it, and we were absolutely astonished at his excellence.  Every one who wants a picture of himself, or herself, or of any friend, should call on Mr. M’Cormac, at once, and procure it.  They will never have an opportunity to get a better one than he will take.  He has an elegant room, fine sky-light, first-class instruments, and every thing necessary to the execution of fine work; and his charges are moderate.  Call at his gallery, and see some of his elegant pictures, even if for no other purpose, for they are really most elegant specimens of a wonderful art.

We would say to mother’s particularly, that Mr. M’Cormac is singularly skillful and fortunate in taking pictures of children, and but rarely fails to get an excellent likeness.

The second advertisement ran from Oct 30 to November 13, 1857 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn from Mr. McCormac, the celebrated Photographist of Clarksville, that he intends paying us a visit soon.—He is a splendid artist and our citizens will have an opportunity of procuring a fine colored photograph equal to an oil painting.—Hop. Mercury.

The third advertisement ran from October 13, 1857 to October 8, 1858 in the Weekly Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our friend McCormac, has attained to the ne plus ultra point, in the art of Daguerreotyping and photographing.  All who feel any interest in the fine arts, whether they want to invest anything in it or not, should call at Mr. McCormac’s gallery, and see to what great perfection he has arrived in his profession; and those who want a first-rate portrait of themselves or friend, should at once avail themselves of Mac’s ability to furnish the very best.

He has supplied himself with everything necessary to his profession, and is prepared to take photographs of every size—from miniature to life-size; and has secured the co-operative service of an excellent portrait painter, to color them from the living subject, and thus secure as good if not a far more accurate portrait than can be procured in any other way.

Mr. McCormac continues to furnish pictures of every other kind, of the very best quality, and at low prices.  In fact he can furnish good likenesses at prices ranging from one to one hundred dollars.  His gallery is on the second floor of the building next to the Northern Bank.

The fourth advertisement appeared on  October 30, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  *Note the date at the end of the advertisement (Dec.5, ’56).  Melainotypes, Ambrotypes, Spereotypes!  If you wish to get a good and lasting likeness call at McCormac & Co.’s Sky and Side Light Daguerrean Gallery, west side of the Square, above the Democratic Reading Room, the only place where that new and beautiful style of picture, the Melainotype, is taken—They having purchased the right.  Give them a call, examine their various styles, and then judge for yourselves.  Ambrotypes put in Pins and Lockets with the greatest care.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.50. Clarksville, *Dec. 5, ’56.

The fifth advertisement appeared on November 13, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  M’cCormac’s Gallery of Photography In All Its Branches.  Pictures of every style and size taken.  Lowest price $1; highest price $75.  Persons having daguerreotypes of deceased friends can have them enlarged to Photographs of the size of life, and colored in oil on canvas or paper, with an accuracy not to be obtained in any other way.  Ambrotypes taken for $1.  Rooms west side of the Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct 1, ’57.

The second announcement appeared on November 20, 1857 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We are pleased to see that our clever friend and accomplished artist, Mr. S. W. Price, has returned to our city, to remain a short time.  We are shown a specimen of his skill, in the way of coloring upon the Photograph likeness of our Editor.  It is certainly a fine specimen of art.

If, with McCormac to take the picture, and Price to do the coloring, our senior’s face is not well taken, then there is no use in any one else trying.  In our opinion, this Photograph cannot be surpassed.

The third announce appeared on March 26, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our Friend McCormac is still taking some of the finest Photographic pictures that we have ever seen.  You should by all means pay a visit to his gallery.

On May 7, 1858 the fourth announcement appeared in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, the excellent Photographic artist, has returned from a visit to Hopkinsville [Kentucky] where he has been professionally engaged for a few weeks.  Let all who desire a good likeness, of any description, call and see him at his gallery over the Northern Bank.

The fifth announcement appeared on May 21, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Mr. Price is again in our midst Mr. Price is a painter of decided merit, and if evidence of that fact were wanting, his picture of that fact were wanting, his picture of Mr. Fillmore is sufficient to place the matter beyond a doubt.  Mr. Price is also a high-toned and honorable gentleman, and we bespeak for him a liberal share of patronage.  We presume he will resume his employment as colorer of Photographers for Mr. W. J. McCormac.  Success attend them both.

The sixth announcement appeared on October 15, 1858 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Among the many improvements of Science, There has perhaps been none more pleasing to us, than the beautiful art of Photography, the rapid strides it has made are surprising.  It is only a few years ago, since the Daguerreotype was the only kind of picture taken by the aid of chemistry; now there is the Ambrotype on glass; the Melainotype on iron; the Photograph on paper and a host of others.  The community are indebted to those gentlemen, whose persevering researches have perfected this most valuable art against scientific and chemical difficulties, that none but the initiated can rightly understand.

Certainly not last, or least of those “devotees of the Sun,” is our friend McCormac, whose work will stand comparison with that of any gallery North or South.  A visit to his rooms will prove that Clarksville is not behind the time in Photography, and his life size Photographs are perfect gems. This process is the most valuable of the whole art.  Daguerreotypes not larger than a small locket, are enlarged to the size of life.  A small “negative” copy is first taken, and then by the use of a powerful lens is magnified on canvass and permanently fixed there; it is then placed in the painters hands where, under the skillful brush, it grows to a beautiful and life-like picture—the drawing must be correct as it is done by the great limner the sun.

As a Photographer, Mr. McCormac stands in the first ranks of his profession, and has striven most earnestly to bring the Art to the highest state of perfection here in Clarksville.  We are much pleased to see that in fine weather his rooms are crowded daily.

The sixth advertisement from October 22, 1858 to December 23, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  W. J. McCormac, Practical Photographist, makes pictures in every style of the art, from the smallest miniature up to life-size Photographs.—Instruction given in any or all of the branches.  Rooms west side Public Square, Clarksville.  Oct. 1, ’58.

The seventh announcement appeared on March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  “Secure the shadow ere the substance fade.”  Now that the weather has cleared off beautifully and Spring has taken the place of old winter, we would advise every one who wishes to preserve their own portraits or that of their friends to call immediately at MacCormac’s Photographic Gallery where he is prepared to get them up from , the smallest to life-size, in the very best style.  He has some of the best life specimens that can be produced anywhere Call and examine them.

The eighth announcement appeared on  March 18, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  If you want a visiting card with your likeness on one corner, McCormac can furnish it.  This style is the “latest agony.” And there is an appropriateness in it which can not fail to impress those who see it.  The Likeness is a photograph, and can be multiplied indefinitely.

The ninth announcement appeared on July 15, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  We learn that Mr. MacCormac intends starting for Europe next week, for the purpose of studying all the latest improvements in Photography.—WE wish his trip may bring him all the pleasure and profit his energy and enterprise most certainly deserve.  Mac stands deservedly high in his profession, and seems determined to spare no effort to keep ahead of all, in his beautiful art.  That’s the right spirit Mac, let the Allies and Austrians do the fighting, and you attend strictly to Photographing.

The tenth announcement appeared on October 28, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Our artist-friend, McCormac, seems determined not to be behind any body in anything that pertains to his business.  His photographic gallery has long been known as a repository rich in gems of art, but its attractiveness has lately been greatly enhanced.  But few of our readers know to what expense and trouble Mr. McCormac has gone in perfecting himself in every department of the beautiful art to which he has devoted himself.  For years past he has studied it with zeal of an enthusiast, and availed himself promptly of every improvement made in it.  During the past summer he has visited most of our larger cities, and several in Europe, in all  of which he had free access to the galleries of art, and full communication with all artist of note in his line, thus adding largely to his own skill and knowledge, and perfecting himself in all the recent improvements in his profession.  Mr. McCormac deserves great credit for the manner in which he has labored to accomplish what he has done. And for the establishment here of a gallery of art that has done honor to the town; and he should be met with, and sustained by, the full patronage of the community.

He furnishes pictures in every style—from the smallest daguerreotype up to the life-size photograph—plain, or colored, at a very moderate charges; and when the life-like image of kindred and friends can be so easily obtained, no one should neglect to procure it.

J. W. McCormac is not listed in other photographic directories.

McCormac & Aubry

1858-1859       Address Unknown, Clarksville, Tennessee.

McCormac & Aubry (J. W. McCormac) were listed in one advertisement that ran from October 15, 1858 to October 28, 1859 in the Clarksville Chronicle (Clarksville, Tennessee).  Gallery of Photography!  Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, Spereotypes, &C.  Albumine and Waxpaper process for views and landscapes.  Pictures put in Pins and Lockets with care and neatness.  Stock and Chemicals for sale.

Our patrons can now have their old Daguerreotypes of deceased friends enlarged to life size Photographs on canvas, and painted in oil, by one of the first Portrait Painters in the country; thus securing a better likeness than by any other method. We respectfully invite an examination of our work.       McCormac & Aubry.

McCormac & Aubry are not listed in other photographic directories.  Craig’s Daguerreian Registry does list W. J. McCormack as being active in Clarksville, Tennessee from 1857-1860 on the West side of the Public Square between Main and Franklin Streets.