Moses Reeves, Jr.

1857-1858       49 Owego Street, over T. C. Thompson’s Merchant Tailor’s store, Ithaca, New                             York.

Moses Reeves, Jr. was recorded in two announcements and two advertisements  The first announcement appeared on July 1, 1857 in the Auburn Weekly American (Auburn, New York).   The Flood At Ithaca.  This calamity was a dreadfully destructive of lives and property.  Bridges, dams, buildings, trees, lumber and animals were swept away by the irresistible torrent.  Many mills and dwellings were destroyed, and several lives….

Mr. Moses Reeves, daguerrean artist buoyed up by a floating timber, was seen to ride high above the surface with portions of his body, for a distance, then, struck by a log, he disappeared, and to his friends was lost; but by a strange good fortune he states the he emerged some rods below, clinging with a death grasp to his float.—onward he floated, among the wrecks of buildings and a furious surf…At eleven O’clock at night Mr.  Reeves reached dry land about one and half miles below his place of starting….

The second announcement appeared on July 4, 1857 in the Keowee Courier (Pickens Court House, South Carolina).  Great Deluge in Ithica New York.  A letter from Ithica, New York, dated June 18, says:  This town was yesterday visited by the most destructive flood that ever came upon it, from many streams that pour their waters into the basin of the Cayuga Lake….

Mr. Moses Reeves, daguerrean artist buoyed up by a floating timber, was seen to ride high above the surface with portions of his body, for a distance, then, struck by a log, he disappeared, and to his friends was lost; but by a strange good fortune he states the he emerged some rods below, clinging with a death grasp to his float.—onward he floated, among the wrecks of buildings and a furious surf…At eleven O’clock at night Mr.  Reeves reached dry land about one and half miles below his place of starting….

The first advertisement ran from May 20, 1857 to May 26, 1858 in the Ithaca Journal and Advertiser (Ithaca, New York).  The Cheapest Yet!  A Large Size Ambrotype Or Daguerreotype, For 50 Cents.  As there has been small size Daguerreotypes taken in town for some time for 50 cents.  I have made arrangements for a Stock of Cases, so that I am now prepared to take Large Size Ambrotypes and Daguerreotypes For Fifty Cents!  The same as have heretofore been taken for One Dollar.

I have also purchased the right for taking Melainotypes, or pictures on enameled sheet Iron.  Pictures on leather and indeed on everything the art is capable of producing.

Remember the number 49 Owego-street, Ithaca, one door below L. H. Culver’s, and over T. C. Thompson’s Merchant Tailor’s Store.  M. Reeves, Jr.

The second advertisement ran from September 15, 1858 to February 23, 1859 in the Ithaca Journal and Advertiser (Ithaca, New York).  The Sun Still Shines!  “By their Works ye know them.”  I would respectfully announce to the citizens of Ithaca and surrounding country, that I have taken the rooms formerly occupied by M. Reeves, over T. C. Thompson’s and 2 doors west of Culver’s store, where I am prepared to take all kinds of Photographic Pictures in a superior manner.  I will take pictures of Invalids or Deceased Persons, at their residence, on the most reasonable terms and the shortest possible notice.  Portraits painted—miniature or life size—in oil and crayon, Views of residences, Draughting and pictures of every description painted to Order.  J. Beardsley.  Ithaca.

Moses Reeves, Jr. is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry. As being active in New York City from 1852 to 1856, but not in Ithaca, New York.

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