Jacob Churchill

1852                Rooms over A. J. Fitch’s Store, Delhi, New York.

1854                Rooms over H. England’s Store, Delhi, New York.

1855-1856       Rooms over Griswold’s Hardware Store, Delhi, New York.

1856-1858       Rooms over Dr. Fitch’s Office, Delhi, New York.

1859                Rooms over Yeoman’s Office, Delhi, New York.

1859                Rooms one door north of the Post Office, Delhi, New York

Jacob Churchill was recorded in eleven advertisement and one announcement in the Delaware Gazette (Delhi, New York).  The first advertisement ran from April 7 to June 2, 1852.  Daguerrean Gallery.  The inhabitants of Delhi and neighboring towns, are respectfully informed that the subscriber has rooms over the store of A. J. Fitch, where he is prepared to take Daguerreotype Likenesses in the latest improvements of the art.  The public are invited to call and examine his pictures for themselves.   Jacob Churchill.                                    

The second advertisement ran from May 24 to June 21, 1854.

Daguerrean Gallery

Attend, ye dwellers ‘neath the sun,

Behold the wonders Art hath done,

We talk by lightning, ride by steam,

and paint by Sol’s eternal beam.

J, Churchill having taken the rooms formerly occupied by M. R. Wilcox, over H. England’s Store, where he intends establishing a Permanent Daguerrean Gallery, would respectfully invite the inhabitants of the village of Delhi and vicinity, to call and examine the superior Daguerreotype Portraits taken by him.  Having been a traveling Daguerrean for two years, his experience in the art, combined with great improvements recently adopted by the most celebrated Artists in this country and Europe, is confident that he can render to his patrons such pictures as are unsurpassed for richness and accuracy of likeness.

He uses none but the very best materials and has obtained and is now using the London Patent Gilding Process, by which a transparent coating is secured over the entire picture, preserving it in all its original beauty unaffected by light or age.

He warrants entire satisfaction in every picture; no Portrait being allowed to leave which is not artistically correct.

Likenesses taken equally well in clear or cloudy weather.  Prices vary according to the size of the Plate and the richness of the Case.  Painting, Statuary and Pictures copied.         

The announcement appeared on January 24, 1855.  Daguerreotypes—For a fine and perfect likeness, call at Churchill’s gallery, over Griswold’s hardware store, next to Delaware Bank.

The third advertisement ran from January 24, 1855 to December 10, 1856.  Daguerrean Room.  The subscriber has returned once more to the village of Delhi, where he is practicing the art of Daguerreotype, over the Store of Griswold & Wright.  He flatters himself from his long experience in the business that he can ensure to his patrons Pictures which  for richness of beauty and clearness, cannot be surpassed.  Gentlemen and Ladies and the public in general, are invited to call.  Satisfaction given in all cases, or no charge.  Instruction given in the art.  J. Churchill. 

The fourth advertisement ran from December 10, 1856 to March 11, 1857.  Daguerreotypes And Ambrotypes.  The subscriber takes this method of informing his friends and inhabitants of this county, that he is now taking Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes in all the beauty of the art.  His long experience and practice enables him to offer to the public, pictures which, for richness, beauty and accuracy, cannot be surpassed by any other artist in this county.

As to the Patented Ambrotype Pictures, he has nothing to say here, but if any Gentleman or Lady will call at his rooms, over Dr. Fitch’s Office, he will soon convince them that they are of short duration.  And the gentleman who offers them to the public must be ignorant of common Philosophy, or that he means to draw from the public funds which he has foolishly spent, (if spent at all.)  That Pictures taken on glass can be made to stand is beyond contradiction, and those favoring him with their patronage shall not go away dissatisfied.

Pictures will be taken at my rooms for a short time, much cheaper than they ever have been before in this county.

Pictures which have heretofore been sold for $1. Will now be sold for 50 cts.; $1.25 for 75 cts.; $1.50 for $1.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens, as he will exhibit none but those of his own taking.  J. Churchill.     

The fifth advertisement ran from December 17, 1856 to March 4, 1857.  Immense Excitement!  Ambrotypes at Reduced Prices!!  The subscriber would say to the public that, notwithstanding the Tremendous Exertions of our “up town” philosopher to the contrary, he is alive and attending to business as usual.  And his “ignorance of common philosophy” does not prevent him from selling the most beautiful pictures taken in this county, and at lower prices than they have ever been sold before.

As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false; and I defy the gentleman (?) who takes so much pains to injure me and make himself appear ridiculous, to produce one that has faded in the least.  And I would like to have him give satisfaction to his customers, whose pictures I have taken over and finished off after passing through his philosophic hands.  I will warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merit’s.  I respectfully invite the public to examine both sides—they shall be the judges.

Call in Ladies and gentlemen, and see who takes the cheapest and best pictures.  A poor picture is dear at any price.  My Rooms are over Elwood’s Store.  Office hours from 9 A. M.  to 3½ P. M.  E. C. Riggs.  Delhi, December 11, 1856.

The sixth advertisement appeared on December 24, 1856.  Pictures on Glass.  The subscriber invites the attention of the public to his advertisement in another column, and his assertions therein contained, are in every respect true and correct. But it not his intention to publish here, but to correct misrepresentations which I see in an advertisement signed E. C. Riggs, in which he states as follows: “As to my Ambrotypes fading, it is false, and I defy the gentleman to produce one that has faded in the least.”  If I am the man to whom he eludes as the “up town philosopher,” and the man who took so much pains to injure him, then I say the gentleman has stated a wicked falsehood, and he could no be ignorant of it I never said a word about his Ambrotypes fading, for there is not one to be found, probably, that is more than three or four months old.  And how does he know whether he asserts the truth or not? 

I did say they were of short duration, and this I am able to maintain.  He further says:  “I warrant my work and am willing it shall stand upon its own merits.”  With what degree of propriety does he warrant his work, and what assurance can he give the public of its duration?  Will the few months he has been in business be a sufficient time to test their durability!  Let the public judge.—Yet he is willing to warrant his work, but is careful not to say how long; he is then willing it shall stand upon its own merits.  So am I, but it will not upon its own merit or any other.

If the Patented Ambrotype was of such durability, why did Brady and others of New York give them up?  Because they were worthless, and his information is from one of the best men in this town, taken from his own lips.

I now come to the last italicized sentence.  “A poor picture is dear at any price.”  This is my sentiments exactly; and those who have been so unfortunate as to get one of your Patented Ambrotypes, will probably find out in short time the truth of this assertion to their sorrow.

Gentlemen and ladies, call at my office and get you a fifty cent picture, and I will make it as durable as the rock of Gibraltar.

Yes, when your flesh in dust shall lie,

When death’s grey film o’er spread your beaming eye,

My life pause mocking at decay,

Will still be fresh and vivid as to-day.

A Splendid Stock just received.  J. Churchill. 

The seventh advertisement ran from March 18, 1857 to May 19, 1858.  Ambrotypes.  The subscriber takes this method of informing his friends and inhabitants of this county, that he is now taking Ambrotypes in all the beauty of the art.  His long experience and practice enables him to offer to the public, pictures which, for richness, beauty and accuracy, cannot be surpassed by any other artist in this county.

As to the Patented Ambrotype Pictures, he has nothing to say here, but if any Gentleman or Lady will call at his rooms, over Dr. Fitch’s Office, he will soon convince them that they are of short duration.  And the gentleman who offers them to the public must be ignorant of common Philosophy, or that he means to draw from the public funds which he has foolishly spent, (if spent at all.)  That Pictures taken on glass can be made to stand is beyond contradiction, and those favoring him with their patronage shall not go away dissatisfied.

Pictures will be taken at my rooms for a short time, much cheaper than they ever have been before in this county.

Pictures which have heretofore been sold for $1. Will now be sold for 50 cts.; $1.25 for 75 cts.; $1.50 for $1.

The public are respectfully invited to call and examine his specimens, as he will exhibit none but those of his own taking.  J. Churchill.      Delhi, Dec. 8, 1856.

The eighth advertisement ran from June 16 to July 7, 1858.  For A Few Days Only, 25 Cent Ambrotypes At Churchill’s Gallery, By L. D. Jones.

The ninth advertisement ran from July 14, 1858 to May11, 1859.  Ambrotypes For Twenty-five Cents, Put up in splendid Cases and equal to any ever sold in Delaware County At Churchill’s Gallery.                                                             

The tenth advertisement ran from April 27 to December 28, 1859.  Ever since Daguerre first invented the art of preserving likenesses, it has been undergoing almost endless improvements, until, at last, it seems as if the inventive genius of man had reached the very acme of perfection in this wonderful art.  There is probably nothing which calls to mind early associations so vividly as to look upon the likeness of an absent parent, brother, sister or friend—nothing more necessary to leave behind us when we shall leave this world for another.  Reader, delay not till Death shall have changed your living body into a mass of mouldering clay, but go to Churchill’s Gallery, over Yeoman’s Office and preserve the likeness of your face in all its loveliness and beauty for those who shall come after you.

The eleventh advertisement ran from May 18 to December 28, 1859.  Look Here.  If you Will Call At Churchill’s Gallery, One door north of the Post Office, you can get a 1-16 size Ambrotype picture for 10 Cents:  and larger sizes, up to ½ , in proportion.

Jacob Churchill is not recorded in other photographic directories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.