Albert Beach

Albert Beach is recorded in the New York Daily Tribune (New York, New York) on July 12, 1848 in the partnership of Paige & Beach. The advertisement reads in part.

Henry Clay In His 71st. Year.—Published this day, (June 6, 1848.) by E. Anthony, 205 Broadway, a beautiful steel mezzotint engraving of Henry Clay, drawn and engraved from several Daguerreotypes by H. H. Ritchie.[1]  This likeness was mainly taken from a fine Daguerreotype now in the possession of the subscriber, executed by Messrs. Paige & Beach, Washington.

The second entry was actually the first mention of the Albert Beach that I came across which appeared in the American Telegraph (Washington, D. C.) on July 8, 1851.

A sad case.—about a week ago the records of the Criminal Court should that Albert Beach had been found guilty of obtaining money under false pretenses; and he was yesterday sentenced by Judge Crawford to the Penitentiary for eighteen months.

This man is, we suppose, about thirty-six years old.  He was educated to commercial business in the city of New York, where he afterward held a profitable and responsible position in one of the first establishments.  He subsequently followed the business of daguerreotyping in this city, with apparently very good success; and while so engaged, two or three years ago, married a most estimable and excellent young lady.  To the surprise of many, however, he suddenly sold out his interest in the daguerreotyping establishment, and threw himself out of business for a time; but after a little commenced an auction store, in which his career was brief, as many who had come to know him predicted.  His course was then rapidly downward, and instead of “swelling” at the hotels he turned to lounging at the groggeries; and instead of trying to effect “transactions” at wholesale stores, his aim was simply to “do” some poor fool out of a few dollars.  Caught in one of these tricks, he has at least been sentenced to the felon’s punishment…

After checking Craig’s Daguerreian Registry Beach was not list but Blanchard P. Paige was.  I checked part of Laurie Baty’s unpublished research of Nineteenth Century Washington, D. C. Photographers, and found an entry that said that he they worked at Plumbe’s studio.

[1] Alexander Hay Ritchie, Engraver, genre, portrait, and figure painter.

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