Tag Archives: William F. Hunter

William F. Hunter

1854-1856                   252 Broadway, New York, New York.[1]

William F. Hunter was recorded in two advertisements, one announcement and one article in The New York Herald (New York, New York).  The first advertisement appeared on July 29, 1854.  Daguerreotype Gallery For Sale.—This Gallery is in a fine location, and well fitted up, with a sky light and every convenience.  Any person who purchases this gallery will be taught the business.  Further particulars can be learned of Wm. F. Hunter, 252 Broadway, opposite City Hall.

The announcement appeared on November 6, 1854.  At A Meeting Of The Sale Makers’ Guard, held on the return of the annual excursion on Friday evening, at the drill room, Centre market, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted—

Resolved, that the thanks of the company be tendered to the following gentlemen for the prizes and good wishes so respectfully given to us on our third annual excursion to…Wm. F. Hunter, order for daguerreotypes;…William F, Hunter, order for daguerreotypes and frame;…

The second advertisement appeared on  June 14, 1855.  Photograph Operator Wanted.—One Who understands the business perfectly can get a fine situation at Hunter’s gallery, 252 Broadway.

The article ran on January 1, 1856 in the Photographic and fine Arts Journal (New York, New York).  The article entitled the Photographic Galleries of America.  Number One, New York. The author visited 69 Galleries in New York City.

Hunter’s—I was pleased to observe that the proprietor of this gallery is still hunting after the best method for daguerreotyping.  May the hunter be successful.  “The games afoot, follow your spirit,” &c.

William F. Hunter is recorded in Craig’s Daguerreian Registry, but is recorded here because of the first-hand account of his work.  Also the fact that the he is selling the gallery on July 29, 1854 indicates that he may have been at this location for some time.

[1] Not all first names or complete addresses were recorded in article.   Craig’s Daguerreian Registry was used to assist in identification when possible first name and address were added.