Disbrow & Clarkson

1851                Nearly Opposite the store of H. S. Smith, Huntington, New York.

1851                On the Common, Roslyn, New York.

Disbrow & Clarkson were recorded in three announcements and one advertisement.  The first announcement appeared in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York) on April 18, 1851. 

Daguerreotypes.—It is an old saying, and none the less true than old “Something new comes every day.”  The last came, in this vicinity, we chronicle as the arrival of a portable Daguerrean Gallery which is now located nearly opposite the Store of H. S. Smith, where the Proprietors are prepared to see and wait upon our citizens, in all branches of the Daguerrean Art, and furnish them a likeness second to none and equal to the best, in any style and form desired.  The arrangement for light—a great essential in daguerreotyping, known to those who have the least knowledge of the art—will be found superior to that secured in an ordinary room.  Being invited to call and see, we went and see’d. The conveniences of the Rooms, neat and tasty—are equal to those of a parlor.  We advise those who want a good reflection of themselves, to embrace the present occasion to get a faithful one.

The advertisement ran from April 18 to May 9, 1851 in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York.).  Rare Chance For The People!!  The subscribers would beg leave to call the attention of all the good people of Huntington and vicinity to the Traveling National Daguerrean Saloon, which is now located on Main st., in Huntington Village, where they will remain a short time, kindly soliciting the patronage of those persons in want of correct likenesses of themselves or friends.  The National has its commodious wings and superior sky lights, which combine its adaptation to perfect the Daguerrean Art. What is there of earthly treasures that we can more highly prize as a Keepsake, than a correct Likeness of some absent friend or relation?

N. B. Miniatures For Lockets, Pins, or Rings.  Without further comment, please Call and satisfy yourselves.

Correct Likeness, or no Charge.  Disbrow & Clarkson, Huntington, April 16, 1851.

The second announcement appeared on May 23, 1851 in The Long Islander (Huntington, New York).  Daguerreotypes.—Messrs. Disbrow & Clarkson, with their Daguerrean Gallery, remain in this village only this week.  Those intending to visit them must do so immediately.  On Monday next they locate at Cold Spring for a short stay.

The third announcement appeared on November 7, 1851 in The Plaindealer (Roslyn, New York).  The Daguerrian Saloon.  Some of our readers in passing through our beautiful village, have no doubt noticed a strange looking object on the common, which the matter of fact may have deemed a bathing machine, drawn up for the season, whilst the more imaginative may have pictured it a miniature Noah’s Ark; or at least, one of Barnum’s Fejee caravans.  Had they noticed closer, they would have perceived that it was neither of these, but a perambulating Daguerrian Saloon, attended by two of the genus-homo.—The one a methodistical looking man, who (see hand-bill) addresses the world at large, as “dear friends”; the other, a good-natured looking young man, in appearance and manners somewhat different from his senior.  These two are the proprietors who philanthropically travel around the country, giving, for the price of twelve shillings; and, contraywise, painting men, horses, houses, monkeys, or anything else in nature, with fidelity, skill and dispatch.  Now, ye good people, who have an idea that ye are good looking, or would like to leave a memorial of yourselves with a friend, now is your chance.  Twelve shillings for immortality!  Cheap enough, in all conscience.  A purse is being raised by our enthusiastic subscribers, which, when filled, is to be devoted to the patriotic purpose of having our portraits taken.—These portraits will, no doubt, be in great request; and the world at large had better call at once on Messrs. Disbrow & Clarkson, and secure an impression.  These are the times when true greatness is held up to light, and fears not the sun’s rays.—Whosoever would be great, must first secure twelve shillings, and then, hey for a Daguerreotype.

Disbrow & Clarkson are not recorded in other photographic directories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.