Mr. Penbroke

1856                Address Unknown, Monfordsville, Kentucky.

Mr. Penbroke was recorded in two announcements the first appeared on April 12,1856 in The Daily Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia).  A Guilty Pair Discovered.— A correspondent of the Bowling Green (Ky.) Standard furnishes the following interesting scene as having occurred in Monfordsville on the 7th ult., to wit:   A daguerrean artist, with a lady who was not his wife, had been operating in the quiet town aforesaid—the gentleman taking pictures and the lady teaching music—for some months. They had gotten music, instruments and all necessary “et ecteras,”and were meeting with great success.  On Friday, the 7th, they were seated at the dinner table, edifying the natives with the following wonderful dialogue.  Mr. Penbroke, (the gentleman’s name) addressing his dear lady, said:

“There seems, my dear, to be some prejudice in Kentucky against Yankees.”

“Oh, yes,” she replied, “but you and I will leave no grounds for prejudice; we’ll clear ourselves, and—

Mr. Penbroke, allow me to introduce you to the Sheriff of Nelson county,” said a hoarse voice behind him.  The Sheriff, then, upon a warrant, proceeded to handcuff the aforesaid Penbroke and lady.  The facts are these:  Penbroke had living in the East a wife and one child; the lady had living in New York a husband and two children.  But Cupid being stronger than law or duty, they eloped to the far West, to live as husband and wife!

The man who introduced the Sheriff was the lady’s father, who, immediately on seeing his daughter, fainted.  He resides in New York, is a man of great wealth, and had lavished vast sums upon his only daughter, whom he tenderly loved.  He had followed them 1,700 miles when he found them.  She is young, beautiful and accomplished, and married well.  Here, indeed, was a “bankruptcy of the heart.”  The guilty pair was placed in a vehicle in company with the wretched father, and are now “gone East.”

The second a few days later on April 16, 1856 in the Raftsman’s Journal (Clearfield, Pennsylvania).  A Surprise.—A correspondent of the Bowling Green (Ky.) Standard furnishes the following interesting scene as having occurred in Monfordsville on the 7th ult.  A daguerrean artist, with a lady represented as being his wife, had been operating in the town aforesaid—he taking pictures, she teaching music—for some months, and were meeting with great success.  On the day named, they were seated at the dinner table, edifying the natives with the following wonderful dialogue.  Mr. Penbroke, (the gentleman’s name, ) said:

“There seems, my dear, to be some prejudice in Kentucky against Yankees.”

“Oh, yes,” she replied, “but you and I will leave no grounds for prejudice; we’ll clear ourselves, and—

Mr. Penbroke, allow me to introduce you to the Sheriff of Nelson county,” said a hoarse voice behind him.  The Sheriff, then, upon a warrant, proceeded to handcuff the aforesaid Penbroke and lady.

The facts are these:  Penbroke had living in the East a wife and one child; the lady had living in New York a husband and two children.  But Cupid being stronger than law or duty, they eloped to the far West, to live as husband and wife!  The man who introduced the Sheriff was the lady’s father, who, immediately on seeing his daughter, fainted.  He resides in New York, is a man of great wealth, and had lavished vast sums upon his only daughter, whom he tenderly loved.  He had followed them 1,700 miles when he found them.  She is young, beautiful and accomplished, and married well.  Here, indeed, was a “bankruptcy of the heart.”  The guilty pair was placed in a vehicle in company with the wretched father, and are now “gone East.”

Mr. Penbroke is not recorded in other photographic directories.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.