Fox

1853                Address Unknown, McArthur, Ohio.                                                                        1853                Address Unknown, Hamden, Ohio.                                                                            1853                Address Unknown, Jackson, Ohio.

Fox was recorded as part of the partnership of McClure & Fox in three announcements and one advertisement.  The first announcement appeared on September 29, 1853 in The Jackson Standard (Jackson, Ohio).  Daguerrean Artist.—The Messrs. McClure & Fox, as will be seen by their advertisement in to-day’s paper, have arrived with their Daguerrean Sky Light Car, and those wishing to have their “pretty faces, “ and ugly ones too, taken in good style, would do well to give them a call.  You have “Waited for the wagon” a long time, and it has come at last.  Embrace this opportunity, and “Secure the Shadow ‘ere the substance fades.”

The advertisement ran from September 29 to October 13, 1853 in The Jackson Standard  (Jackson, Ohio).  Sky Light Daguerrean Car.  McClure & Fox.  Respectfully beg leave to announce to the citizens of Jackson, and vicinity, that they have arrived with their Car, and will remain but a short time, all who may desire  superior likeness, (such as are produced by Sky Light Galleries,) may now have an opportunity, without the additional expense of traveling to our larger cities.

A splendid variety of cases always on hand.  In regard to dress—we would suggest to Ladies to wear Black, Brown, Red or any dark color always, avoiding Blue White or any light color.

Copying from Daguerreotypist, Paintings, &c., done in the neatest manner.  Call and examine specimens.  Jackson, Sept. 29, 1853.

The second announcement appeared on October 6, 1853 in The Jackson Standard (Jackson, Ohio).  We endorse the following from the McArthur Republican, and will just add that those wishing a good picture, had better have it taken now, as you may not again have the same opportunity:—

McClure & Fox’s Daguerrean Car has left our place for Hamden, where, we understand, they will remain only one week.  They go thence to Jackson.  We bespeak for them a hearty welcome, for we can assure our Jackson friends that their pictures are of the highest order of merit, and far surpass any attempts that ever before have been made in this place.

With Mr. Fox we have been personally acquainted for a number of years. Acquainted for a number of years.  He is a man of character and ability; a real, genuine “clever fellow,” and an accomplished artist.  Being in possession of all the late improvements in the Daguerrean Art, as practiced in the Eastern cities, his pictures are surprisingly accurate and life-like, and cannot fail to render satisfaction to all who may favor him with a call.

The third announcement appeared on November 24, 1853 in The Jackson Standard (Jackson, Ohio).  Mac. M’Clure, Daguerreotypist, wishes us to say to his friends in this county, that he has “caught a certain Fox” in a ——trap, and wishes us to exhibit him.  We would much rather he would procure the services of a Barnum or do the job himself, but as he thinks folks will believe us before they would them, here goes it:  Some time ago, the firm of Fox & McClure came into our place with a “big Wagon” in which they took Daguerreotypes; Fox, the principal operator, wished for and got a dissolution of partnership, and before leaving for the South, circulated the story, that Monsieur Mac McClue could not take a good picture.  We have examined the work of both these artists, and must give the preference to McClure.

Fox is not recorded in any other photographic directories.  Fox is possibly Robert E. Fox who was active in Zansville, Ohio from 1859 to 1860.  McClure is also not listed in other photographic directories.

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